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-   -   Reasonable price to run a gas line inside (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/reasonable-price-run-gas-line-inside-181740/)

CitadelBlue 06-12-2013 03:35 PM

Reasonable price to run a gas line inside
 
2 Attachment(s)
I'm in northern VA just outside Washington DC. I am a DIY er and redoing my kitchen. We are changing from an electric range to an electric double oven and a gas cooktop. Oven is in and working and next on the work list is the cooktop install. I've been following the DIY gas line post in this forum and am not adverse into running the gas line BUT ....... what is the consensus on cost to hire a professional to run the gas line as follows:

Tap into gas line currently servicing the furnace and hot water heater located in the middle of the house (unfinished basement).

Run approximately 35 ft (about 20 ft out then turn 90 degrees for 10 ft and then up through the floor ) of 3/4 inch gas line. Can use either black pipe or CSST

What do you think? What should I pay?

TarheelTerp 06-12-2013 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CitadelBlue (Post 1200027)
What do you think? What should I pay?

http://www.diychatroom.com/f2/how-mu...s-here-127914/

CitadelBlue 06-12-2013 05:31 PM

As as DIY er to DIY et , what should I expect to pay

Ghostmaker 06-12-2013 06:23 PM

What price do you think is reasonable? Get three quotes take the middle.

gregzoll 06-12-2013 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CitadelBlue (Post 1200077)
As as DIY er to DIY et , what should I expect to pay

How about telling all of us, why Grass is Green, dirt is Brown, and the Sky is Blue.

TheEplumber 06-12-2013 07:27 PM

CitadelBlue- There are too many variables to price here. Your best bet is to get the quotes as Ghostmaker suggested.
A good plumber will resize your line and make sure the connection can be made at your suggested point.
Your new demand may be too much for the existing line so some existing pipe upsizing may be needed- somebody needs to run the calcs first.
This will obviously affect your price

Windows on Wash 06-13-2013 07:38 AM

+1

Get a few quotes and vet the contractors.

Might be a DIY capable project if you are decent and there is a solid and tight shut off valve prior to the joints.

The nice thing about running pipe is if you do it right, it will never leak down the road.

hammerlane 06-13-2013 08:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
In the photos you post, where are you thinking is the place to tap into for the new run to your cooktop?

Is the main run from the meter all in 3/4"?

How much additional pipe length is there from the meter to the piping you show in the photos?

How many BTUs is the new cooktop?

How many BTUs is the furnace?

How many BTUs is the hot water heater?

hammerlane 06-13-2013 08:29 AM

Reason I asked all above questions is say the point in your photos is 30 feet of developed pipe length from the meter and is all 3/4".

By develeoped pipe length I mean the actual length may only be 22 feet but you have to add in any 90's or Tee's as its equivalent length of pipe.
A 3/4" 90 is equal to 2.06 feet and a 3/4" Tee is equal to 4.12 feet


So that point in the photo is 30 feet from the meter. 30 feet of 3/4" can deliver 151 cubic feet per hour. This is about 153,000 BTU per hour.

If your furnace is 100,000 BTU.
If your hot water tank is 45,000 BTU
If your cooktop is 36,000 BTU

This all adds up to 181,000 BTU per hour needed at the point in your photo.

Now you need to add in the developed length of pipe from the point in your photo to the cooktop which you say is 35 feet which is propably more like 43 feet when you factor in equivalent lenths.

An upsize to 1" from your meter may be needed to the point in your photos. Then possibly 1/2" or 3/4" can be run to furnace, hot water and cooktop.

Thirty(30) feet of 1" pipe can deliver 284 cubic feet per hour. This is about 288,000 BTU per hour.

hammerlane 06-13-2013 08:38 AM

The cost to do this work is hard to say. If you want a ballpark figure here it is:

Dodger Stadium---56,000
Yankee Stadium---53,325
Coors Field--- 50,490
Turner Field---50,097
Arlington Stadium---49,170


****Don't look at it as you pay him $100 for 1 hour of work, look at it as he saved you 10 hours of work****

md2lgyk 06-13-2013 10:12 AM

When I built my house, I did all the plumbing but had the propane company run the gas lines to my tankless water heater and backup furnace. It was a flat $125 per connection. Took them two days, as they did a 24-hour pressure test on them.

rosem637 06-13-2013 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerlane (Post 1200394)
Reason I asked all above questions is say the point in your photos is 30 feet of developed pipe length from the meter and is all 3/4".

By develeoped pipe length I mean the actual length may only be 22 feet but you have to add in any 90's or Tee's as its equivalent length of pipe.
A 3/4" 90 is equal to 2.06 feet and a 3/4" Tee is equal to 4.12 feet


So that point in the photo is 30 feet from the meter. 30 feet of 3/4" can deliver 151 cubic feet per hour. This is about 153,000 BTU per hour.

If your furnace is 100,000 BTU.
If your hot water tank is 45,000 BTU
If your cooktop is 36,000 BTU

This all adds up to 181,000 BTU per hour needed at the point in your photo.

Now you need to add in the developed length of pipe from the point in your photo to the cooktop which you say is 35 feet which is propably more like 43 feet when you factor in equivalent lenths.

An upsize to 1" from your meter may be needed to the point in your photos. Then possibly 1/2" or 3/4" can be run to furnace, hot water and cooktop.

Thirty(30) feet of 1" pipe can deliver 284 cubic feet per hour. This is about 288,000 BTU per hour.


Wow thats alot of information to consider just for adding a cooktop. I wonder if the OP considered all that when switching from electric to gas cooking.

gregzoll 06-13-2013 01:05 PM

Rosem637, it is called overkill. Most likely they will be fine with the existing 3/4 that is already there.

Who ever did the black iron for our gas in our house, came off the 1" incoming about ten feet in where it entered, and ran 3/4 all the way from there to the stove service at about 20 feet of line.

One of these days, that mess is getting redone, with a proper manifold for the furnace, water heater and stove.

hammerlane 06-13-2013 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1200520)
it is called overkill. Most likely they will be fine with the existing 3/4 that is already there.

In my previous post I forgot about the addition of the double oven along with the cooktop.

Regarding adding additional lengths of pipe and the addition of a new cooktop and new double oven that will add probably an additional 70,000 BTU demand you may go on the premise of "most likely" it will be fine.

National Fuel & Gas Code 5.4.2.2 says "The total connected hourly load shall be used as the basis for piping sizing assuming all appliances are operating at full capacity simultaneously."

No way say on a Thanksgiving day with the furnace firing, hot water tank firing and double oven and cooktop firing will a 3/4" run supply enough gas to meet that demand.

Amateuralex 06-13-2013 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CitadelBlue (Post 1200077)
As as DIY er to DIY et , what should I expect to pay

We paid $250 here in Ann Arbor, and it was done with a flexible line by a local plumber that I trust.


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