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Old 12-15-2011, 03:20 PM   #1
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range gas line - is this OK?


Hey all,

We bought our home 2 years ago. During the inspection, the inspector noticed the range had flex line running through a hole in the kitchen floor where it attached to the the on-off valve in the basement ceiling. We requested it be brought to code (which mean no flex line through floor and the valve on the kitchen side). Well they got it half right. They put an 8 inch pipe extention off the valve into the kitchen, sticking out behind the range. But the valve is still in the basement.

Anyway, we just bought a new range. The new flex line is about 2X the diameter of the old one as the range uses more gas. And it has this brass backflow safety adapter on it. That is supposed to connect right into the valve as the end of this adpter on the end of the flex is male. Well - what I had sticking out of my floor from the old setup was also male - and smaller in diameter.

After thinking through possible solutions, what I did was replace the extension pipe just above the valve (still in basement).

So I've got

main gas line in basement ceiling
valve in basement ceiling
female/female coupler in basement ceiling
1 foot black pipe running from that coupler into kitchen
another coupler
brass safety adapter
flex line to the range

I used yellow teflon gas tape for all joints EXCEPT the flange joints as the flex hose instructions said not to for those.

I turned on the gas and tested for leaks with sprayed-on soapy water. No leaks.


While I know techincally the valve should be in the kitchen side - is there anything else wrong with this setup?

Pics attached. In the shot down the hole, you can see the lower coupler just above the yellow valve.
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range gas line - is this OK?-photo2.jpg   range gas line - is this OK?-photo.jpg  

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Old 12-15-2011, 03:39 PM   #2
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range gas line - is this OK?


wow wow do you know how many threads has the potential to leak...when you could have done this with 3-4 threads......just ranten,,,,not how i would leave it ..if you paid to have it up to code....its not....valve is required to be behind the stove,,,,,not in basement... call them back have it done right....

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Old 12-15-2011, 03:47 PM   #3
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range gas line - is this OK?


I would remove the valve in the basement. Put a coupler in its place, and put the valve at the end of the pipe behind the stove where it should be. I would then close up that hole a bit, and seal around the pipe.
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Old 12-15-2011, 04:35 PM   #4
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range gas line - is this OK?


Quote:
Originally Posted by hyunelan2 View Post
I would remove the valve in the basement. Put a coupler in its place, and put the valve at the end of the pipe behind the stove where it should be. I would then close up that hole a bit, and seal around the pipe.
Ayuh,... I agree,...
Turn that whole thing upside-down, 'n it's In Code...
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Old 12-15-2011, 04:51 PM   #5
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range gas line - is this OK?


Thanks all - good feedback.

Actually, I considered moving the valve to kitchen side. Except that would mean I'd need to turn off the gas to the whole house. With this fix, I was at least able to work above the closed valve. Also - the valve is easy to get to to shut off - but it's accessed through a 10"x10" access panel in the drywall ceiling of the basement. Easy to shut off - but would be very hard to work in there to replace the valve with a coupler.

But per hyunelan2's idea - that would leave me with the coupler (in basement, 2 joints) and the valve in kitchen (3 joints). I can't see any other way to lessen that. Right now, I've got, I've got 6 total joints (see attached).

So while hyunelan2's idea does bring me to code, from a technical standpoint, I only eliminate one joint.

Code aside regarding valve placement, is there some rule about number of joints? Or it is a guideline?

Finally - was the suggestion about sealing the hole in the floor tightly so if there is a gas leak, it will be noticable in the kitchen vs. all escaping to the basement?

BTW - I know code is code, period. Still, I can access that shut-off much faster where it currently is in the basement vs. unmounting my range, pulling it out, and shutting it off.
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Last edited by denemante; 12-15-2011 at 04:54 PM.
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Old 12-15-2011, 07:35 PM   #6
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range gas line - is this OK?


measure from main line to 2"above floor have nipple made at hardware then install valve..then flex...then in code ..then done right...theres only one way the right way Ben.........yes have to shut gas off to house 5-10 minutes to put in nipple and valve....
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:18 PM   #7
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range gas line - is this OK?


Just curious question for the experts.............could he leave valve in basement and install a second valve behind stove? Inquiring minds want to know?
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:24 PM   #8
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range gas line - is this OK?


I'm the OP - yes, I had that same question about the second valve.

But it seems like everyone is saying to limit the amount of connectors/joints.

Per my drawing - the proposed plan - that's the only possible solution I can see, which would bring it to code and used the fewest possble joints. Regardless, with that solution, I only eliminate one joint (going from 6 like I have now down to 5).

So are you saying to do this simply to bring it to code? Or are you also saying I need to eliminate that one extra joint (one more place to leak) as well?
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Old 12-15-2011, 10:33 PM   #9
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Not sure in his area but here in Florida you could not have that 2nd valve below the floor if the house had a basement, also need sediment trap just before taping into the appliance.
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:34 AM   #10
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range gas line - is this OK?


this is not just about joints,,,,the more you have the greater potential for leaks,,,,not a code issue.. so listen up...if you come off main line to above floor...1-joint at main...above floor..1-joint valve....now your above floor with valve in code 1 thread joint below....do what you want above floor be neat and clean ...
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:44 AM   #11
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range gas line - is this OK?


Two choices
1. Shut the gas off at the main and run the black pipe through floor with gas valve behind stove.

2. Shut off gas and install another valve above floor.

You wrote to DIY seeking advice well here's my advice do it like number 1. Or call a gas pro to do it for you.
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Old 12-16-2011, 07:48 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George6488 View Post
Just curious question for the experts.............could he leave valve in basement and install a second valve behind stove? Inquiring minds want to know?
you could but I would not .....don't need to double valve anything..Ben
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Old 12-16-2011, 10:06 AM   #13
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range gas line - is this OK?


Now I see how simple a fix this is (like Ben suggests).

I'll remove the my whole pipe/apparatus from the main, and replace with a single pipe that goes from the main up throught the floor. Put a valve on top and connect my gas line. Done.

But a few questions:

1. The yellow teflon tape - at least two full wraps, and cover ALL the threads?
2. On any place where there is a flange - no yellow tape?
3. As I use a pipe wrench to remove my old stuff - any concern about shaking or loosening something on the main line (which runs off across my basement ceiling under the drywall)?
4. As another poster suggested - should I seal up the hole in the floor the pipe comes up through? If so - with what? Perhaps cut a plywood plate, tack it down, the seal everything with caulk? Or skip that and use GreatStuff?
5. I can't tell yet, but my main line looks like it's down just about 12 inches from the floor above. Thus - I'd need about a 14 inch pipe to have my valve about 2 inches high on the floor above. Not sure they make 14 inch black pipe. Is there another acceptable height out of the floor?
6. How tight do I tighten all the connections? I'm a strong guy and sometimes I feel like I might break something or even overtighten.

Finally - I've got a family. I consider myself extremely handy. This should be about a 7 minute and $10 job. But I am working with and around gas, and this job has got to be perfect - and remain perfect over the long term.

If I hired someone, I suspect it would end up 100% the same. Don't know that spending $100 or more for someone else do to this would give me any added peace of mind. So do I go DIY or pay a pro, simply because of the nature of the job?
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Old 12-16-2011, 08:38 PM   #14
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range gas line - is this OK?


the fact that you already did some piping and it did not leak ...you should be able to do this .....you can come up above the floor 2,4,6,8, inches what ever nipple you can get ...teflon tape on threads that don't have flare.....snug them up don't kill it....then check it with soapy water...
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Old 12-17-2011, 12:13 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denemante View Post
But a few questions:

1. The yellow teflon tape - at least two full wraps, and cover ALL the threads?
2. On any place where there is a flange - no yellow tape?
3. As I use a pipe wrench to remove my old stuff - any concern about shaking or loosening something on the main line (which runs off across my basement ceiling under the drywall)?
4. As another poster suggested - should I seal up the hole in the floor the pipe comes up through? If so - with what? Perhaps cut a plywood plate, tack it down, the seal everything with caulk? Or skip that and use GreatStuff?
5. I can't tell yet, but my main line looks like it's down just about 12 inches from the floor above. Thus - I'd need about a 14 inch pipe to have my valve about 2 inches high on the floor above. Not sure they make 14 inch black pipe. Is there another acceptable height out of the floor?
6. How tight do I tighten all the connections? I'm a strong guy and sometimes I feel like I might break something or even overtighten.
I'll answer a few of the above;

1. Leave the first 1 or 2 threads bare so that no tape or dope can accidentally get into the pipe.
3. Use 2 pipe wrenches. One to hold T or elbow & firmly in place and the other to remove the ~12" piece from your main line.
5. The new piece can be cut and threaded to whatever length you need. Just make sure it's a couple of inches above the floor.
6. Start it by hand to make sure you don't end up cross hreading and then tighten till it's at least 2/3 of the way down. Gas tape is a lot thicker than regular teflon so it won't snug down as far.

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