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Old 01-21-2012, 06:10 AM   #31
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PVC pipes in new concrete slab


Wouldn't have thought you could have too much slope - I sure have a lot to learn. Thanks again for your insightful advice.

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Old 01-21-2012, 07:47 AM   #32
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Yes you definately dont want solids to seperate and start building up in sewer
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Old 01-21-2012, 09:43 AM   #33
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Wouldn't have thought you could have too much slope - I sure have a lot to learn. Thanks again for your insightful advice.
Me neither. I learned something new today. If 1" per 4 ' is minimum slope, what then would you consider maximum slope?

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Old 01-21-2012, 10:05 AM   #34
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Hey beepster, that was my thought as well. I would have considered a 100% drop optimum - i.e. straight down. I have been informed that my connection to the city sewer may be as deep as 8 ft. I was shocked, didn't know it was that deep. Probably have to have a pro install that part. I can't even dig 8 ft deep. My drain from the slab to the city sewer will probably be only 50' long. Plenty of room for whatever slope is desirable. If you, or anyone , knows of a formula or rule of thumb for drain slope, please advise; Otherwise, I suppose 1/4 "/ft is suitable. THANKS!

Last edited by ChiefVOL; 01-21-2012 at 10:07 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:47 AM   #35
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PVC pipes in new concrete slab


Just talked to a couple of my "old-tymer", plumber friends -
They suggest trying to maintain a slope of 1/4" per foot for a 3" - 4" drain -
is considered the "sweet-spot".
(1/2" per foot the Max. - they suggested against that, though)
If you're going to have a vertical drop - don't use a "tight", 90 at the bottom
Use a "wide" 90 (sweep).
I'm sure "plummen" will take everything into consideration!
Good luck!

rossfingal

Just remembered this - the last one we did - the city (Aurora, Ill.) wanted 3" (min.) inside and
6" on the outside.
Remember - "Clean-Outs"!!

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Old 01-21-2012, 10:53 AM   #36
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So kind of you to take the time to respond rossfingal. I trust the ol tymers more than anyone - nothing like experience. Looks like I will have a several foot drop to connect to the city sewer. I understand the concept of a wide sweep 90. THANKS. I am so excited to attempt this project. I have so much to learn. Gives me something to do, a goal, and keeps me out of trouble.
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Old 01-21-2012, 11:21 AM   #37
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No problem!
Remember - it's not a "job" - it's an "adventure"!
"trouble"?? - don't worry about that!
Usually, there will be some kind of "trouble" down the road!
("Murphy's Law" - always, "kicks-in"!)

As far as the slab -
as stated above - post a thread in the "Building & Construction", sub-forum.
A number of very, knowledgeable "crete" people there!


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Old 01-21-2012, 05:25 PM   #38
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Chief, I usually don't look in this part of the forum but for some strange reason I did today. I live in Chattanooga, about an hour from where you're going to build. I do have quite a bit of experience in building and will be glad to tell you anything I possible can, I wish I could help but my old body is shot now.

I have plumbed a few houses but am no expert there, I have wired quite a few houses but am no expert there but I always passed inspection including changing out panels. I have done less plumbing than electrical. I didn't have a problem plumbing a house but have never hooked to the sewer, in west Tennessee where I am from, you have to have a licensed plumber to hook in and you may here also.

Pouring your slab, I would highly advise letting a pro do that, it is not an easy job nor is it easy to get the slab level without hills and dips. Too many hills and dips and you will have a lot of problems with your walls, especially the high spots. When I was building I told my concrete men I wanted it close, I didn't want to have a puddle cover a dime after it rained and most times it was that way.

Did you say you were going to have block walls for your house or did I misunderstand? The reason I asked is you might want to reconsider block walls. If they aren't insulated and insulated well they will sweat and you will have mold problems, also it is hard to heat and cool a block house. It is hard to do most anything construction wise with block walls. Electrical, installing windows and doors, connecting the roof and joists unless you fill the blocks and use bolts.

The first thing you will need to do before starting your plumbing is lay out your house, batter board and string it so you will get all your plumbing on grade and in the right places. You can't know where your walls are and can't know where the plumbing goes without having a lay out, not just outside walls but inside walls also (at least where the plumbing goes in a wall and weight bearing walls).

Here is just a thought for you. When I was building I put a chase or 2" PVC pipe in the slab to run my water pipes through. If there was ever a leak all you had to do is pull the water pipe and replace instead of busting a slab to fix.

When you post hole 4 foot on grid for the slab, be careful not to hit any of your plumbing pipes, you can flag the pipes so you will know where they are. Sorry, I got carried away here, long post.
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Old 01-21-2012, 07:06 PM   #39
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Hey jiju1943, thanks for the response. Yea I am just across signal Mtn. The are several reasons for the block walls. First, and foremost, I am attempting to build the house (only 750 sq ft ) to be solar heated. The 24 ft wall facing you (south) will be cinder block, filled with grout, to serve a a heat mass - my thrombe wall. A glass wall will be built just outside this block wall to collect heat on the block wall. The other three block walls will be insulated with some yet to be determined synthetic material. Second, I am not a very good carpenter and from what i am reading, dry-stack cinder block walls are relatively simple to install and even stronger than mortered walls. As for framing for the windows, I have an awful lot to learn. The West side of the house will have a lot of glass just for viewing since the south wall is completely blocked in. I will also have a small pot-bellied stove for really cold nights in the winter. I am 54 now, poor and can't wait to come to Sequatchie Valley. I am trying to learn all I can and hopefully in the near future I can begin construction. There will be no huge hurry since mondy is in short supply. Build the slabe first with roughed in plumbing and electrical. Then the walls. I have no idea how to begin on a roof!! Maybe you can advise me on th electrical. I believe the only 220v will be the stove ( water heater?) Placing electrical outlets in either the wall or floor is going to be a trick - much thought and design will have to be given here. I do not want to use wire mold - not very original. I suppose wall outlets and switches is the way to go. Now I am the one rambling.

Thanks for your time and advise. What part of Chattanooga are you in?
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:40 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by ChiefVOL View Post
Hey jiju1943, thanks for the response. Yea I am just across signal Mtn. The are several reasons for the block walls. First, and foremost, I am attempting to build the house (only 750 sq ft ) to be solar heated. The 24 ft wall facing you (south) will be cinder block, filled with grout, to serve a a heat mass - my thrombe wall. A glass wall will be built just outside this block wall to collect heat on the block wall. The other three block walls will be insulated with some yet to be determined synthetic material. Second, I am not a very good carpenter and from what i am reading, dry-stack cinder block walls are relatively simple to install and even stronger than mortered walls. As for framing for the windows, I have an awful lot to learn. The West side of the house will have a lot of glass just for viewing since the south wall is completely blocked in. I will also have a small pot-bellied stove for really cold nights in the winter. I am 54 now, poor and can't wait to come to Sequatchie Valley. I am trying to learn all I can and hopefully in the near future I can begin construction. There will be no huge hurry since mondy is in short supply. Build the slabe first with roughed in plumbing and electrical. Then the walls. I have no idea how to begin on a roof!! Maybe you can advise me on th electrical. I believe the only 220v will be the stove ( water heater?) Placing electrical outlets in either the wall or floor is going to be a trick - much thought and design will have to be given here. I do not want to use wire mold - not very original. I suppose wall outlets and switches is the way to go. Now I am the one rambling.

Thanks for your time and advise. What part of Chattanooga are you in?
I live about a mile from where is called Moccasin Bend of the Tennessee River and Lookout mountain just off I-24, west Chattanooga. This side of Signal Mountain is about 20 minutes from our house.

Man it is beautiful on a frosty morning coming over the mountain looking down in Sequatchie Valley and the smoke coming out of some the farm houses chimneys there.

The roof is no problem, it is just a matter of doing. Running the electrical isn't a problem either if you know where it is going before laying the blocks, it can be stubbed up and kept inside the blocks. The holes for the Receptacles can be cut in the blocks also, it just makes it so much easier, to fish the wire, you will see what I mean. You will want at least a 100 Amp service and the wire is a lot easier than pulling 00 wire for a 200 amp service and cheaper also. The county furnishes the meter base, at least they use to.

I will PM you my email address and if you can get me a rough sketch of what you want I can draw it up for you. I have a 3D Architect drawing program which is easy to use.

I like the idea of solar energy, I looked into that a number of years ago and it still fascinates me. I am not familiar with the dry stack blocks so I will need some brushing up on that. Are you going to try for solar heated water also. It shouldn't be a problem with your mass wall.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:52 AM   #41
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Reasoning behind not having "too much" drop in your pipe is that the water will rush down and drain leaving the solids behind. Yuck.

If you have need for more drop, you can add one or more vertical drops using long 90's. Better to keep those to a minimum so the line isn't all twisty-turny in case you ever need it cleaned out, etc.
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Old 01-22-2012, 06:44 AM   #42
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Now you're talking!! I have dreamed of this home for 30 years. I went to School at UTC, when Jimmy Carter and Al GORE were so big into Solar Enery and alternative fuel sources. If only our Country had pursued these avenues, we would never have had the Irag and Afgan wars. Our cars would be running on Moonshine and Global Warming would not exist. I hope to do my part, if only because it makes sense money wise

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