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Old 01-19-2012, 04:34 PM   #16
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Ill send you an email

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Old 01-19-2012, 04:35 PM   #17
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Waiting on the Postman, with wings on his back!
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:44 PM   #18
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I sent you a pm on here with my adress,check your messages
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:52 PM   #19
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Thanks - I have less than 20 messages, so I am not allowed to respond. I have your address and will mail my floor plans to you tomorrow. Wish they were more professional, but I hope you get the jest of the plan, In case it matters, I should not have to go more than 50 feet befor I tie into the city sewer with these drain pipes. You are an Angel in my eyes!!!
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:59 PM   #20
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Im sure ive seen worse!
The worst one i remember ever getting was for a bar/restaraunt ,i seem to remember that place being approx 10,000 sq ft.
Anyway they gave me a piece of paper saying the scale was 1" was approximately 10'!
I asked them if they could narrow it down just a little but they didnt have a clue,in their defense the cities electrical inspector at the time didnt know what a gfci was either!
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:18 PM   #21
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I'm pretty ignorant, but at least I know a ground fault circuit interrupter! While I have your attention, if it matters, I should only have to carry the drain pipes 50' or so from the house to the city sewer system. I have never built anything before. I did work a couple years as peon electrician on construction sites so I have SEEN a lot of what I want to do. By trade, I am an Environmental Chemist, University of Tennessee. Due to drinking problems, I have not worked much in the past several years. I am now, and have been, in an Alcohol Rehabilitation program for the past 18 months. Haven't drank a drop and don't plan to. I am 54 years old and completly broke. I have a small piece of property in Dunlap, TN. 75 years ago, my grandfather laid two foundations on this piece of property. My Uncle has lived on one for the past 70 years. I hope to build on the other in the near future - hence doing all the work myself. the cinder block foundation is 40' x 25'. I am hoping the blocks have been poured with concrete, although I plan on pouring the slab over the foundation. Does this make sense? On the south 25' wall, I am installing a passive heated cinder block Trombe wall. I want to install a solar heated wall collector on the roof, plumbed into my water heater. Unless some lady feels very sorry for me, I will be living alone - except for cats and dogs, so 50 gallons a day should suffice. Trying to keep my electic bill as low as possible. We are in the hills of Tennessee, so I am going to get a small pot bellied stove for the winter. Should be all I need. Hope to keep electric bill below $50/month. Looks like my SS check will be only $700.00/mo if I retire at 62, $950/mo at 66 1/2. Guess I'll work till 66- that is if I can find a job. Anyway, this is why I am trying to figure out how to build this 750 sq ft home myself. I think I can do the slab for $1,200 - 1000 sq ft, 4" thick. Does this sound reasonable? Probably have to hire someone to finish it cause I don't have a clue - that's probable another $200 - forming and finishing. Gonna drystack the cinder block walls, then fill with grout. One step at a time. Get the slab poured with the plumbing and electrical conduit in place. Thanks for all your help
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:28 PM   #22
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Ive got no problem helping someone trying to help themselves,Ive plumbed/wired a lot of habitat for humanity houses in the past.
If you were closer id come down there and help you with it.
As far as the concrete goes you might want to post that over in the carpentry or construction forum,might have better luck
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:34 PM   #23
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I know you would help! I will settle for the advice of a wise old owl. Thanks for everything, I really appreciate it. I hope I can figure out how to PM you in the future.
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:37 PM   #24
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As far as the electrical goes i wouldnt think youd have much of that in your floor,id bring the service in on whichever side was closest to a pole with the meter socket between 4-5' centered on outside wall depending on what local codes you have and mount service panel directly behind inside of house.
From there id run everything through the walls/attic as needed to feed everything
Once i get your drawings ill help you figure electric service also
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:42 PM   #25
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I am poor -
Do you at least have enough to buy a "DIY Guide to Plumbing" from Home Depot or Lowes? At least that will give you a good grasp of plumbing concepts so you then know what questions to ask. While you're there, pick up an electric guide also. Good investment.

B
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Old 01-19-2012, 06:50 PM   #26
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Chief,

I recently began a 314 square foot addition on my home in Arizona. A good portion of the addition is a bathroom with shower, tub, double lav and a toilet.

Like you, I wanted to save money and do with work myself. I am not in construction (or any trade) as a profession - I sit behind a desk all day shuffling paper. However, I'm very ambitious and pretty handy with tools and building. I'm also a perfectionist, which means I pay attention to detail and I want everything to be just right. I bring that up, because for a DIY'er to successfully complete large, technical jobs (such as a sanitary drain system) you will need to persevere to find correct information, diligent in doing the work the right way the first time, and patient enough to take your time and not make mistakes.

I spent two months drawing my plans and studying code requirements in my area. I keep my city's residential code book in my bookmarks and I refer to it often.

Getting to plumbing - I installed my own drain system for my addition and tied it in to the existing drain on my property that leads to the city sewer. This is a job that many said wasn't DIY. But I took my time with it, laid everything out, checked and double checked everything, etc. Its easy to take your time when you have plenty of it. And thats my situation - I have time, but I don't have a ton of money - Hence the DIY nature of my project.

A great plumbing resource is the terrylove.com plumbing forum. But don't go there expecting someone to hold your hand through this and answer all your questions. Go there and search and read and learn. When you feel armed with enough information to proceed, THEN you can ask specific questions. Otherwise you will get nothing but "hire a professional" as a response. As written by Terry Love the plumber himself, in a post I read on his forum, (not verbatim) "The right homeowner can do a better plumbing job than many plumbers out there."

You say that you dont have any code requirements where you are building. I'd say you should still follow minimum code so that what you build will last and work the way it should. Some basics in MY area include:

- Min 1/4" grade per foot on horizontal pipes.
- 3" or 4" pipe for toilet.
- 1.5" pipe for bathroom sinks (Lavs).
- 1.5" pipe for tubs
- 2" pipe for shower
- Two way clean out outside at house

Some other common tidbits:

- No sanitary T for verital to horizontal runs. Horizontal to vertical ONLY.
- No horizontal turns greater than 45 degrees without a cleanout.
- No underground turns greater than 45 degrees without a cleanout (unless you use the appropriate long sweep fitting for a vertical to hotizontal only).
- Everything has to have a trap! (Toilets have their own built in trap).
- Everything has to be vented!
- Proper venting is tricky in bathrooms - Venting that is set up wrong can cause a toilet flush to suck the water right out of a sink P-trap (or any other p-trap) letting sewer gases into the home.
- Underground pipe must be "shaded" prior to filling in the area with dirt/fill. Shading is where you hard pack your fill material (I used dirt) under and around the sides of the pipe so that just the top 20-25" of the pipe is visible. This keeps the pipe from sagging/settling and causing backups, etc. later on.
- Water mast test your system before you bury it and especially before you pour concrete over it. Find any leaks now and fix before its too late.

Some things I learned the hard way:
- Driving nails into your drain pipe is bad! (oops!!)
- Dry fitting pipes is good, for basic layout aid, but the dimensions change when you glue, so plan on making stuff long and cutting it to length as you go.
- When laying your drains and vents, plan where your wall studs (or concrete blocks) will go and make sure the vent pipe that will run up into the wall wont intersect a stud or anything else.
- Everything will take 2-3 times as long as you think it will.

There is a ton of information out there. For more localized codes, I'd suggest looking online for the building department in your nearest big city and search their website for their residential building code. It can be like reading a foreign language at first, but once you learn to navigate it, it becomes easier. Having local information is a really good idea. For instance, my area does not hard freeze in the winter - So there is no frost depth to worry about. Other areas may require pipes be buried 2-3 feet down, while even other areas may require 6 feet...8? who knows? A word on safety - you mentioned connecting to the city sewer...My city sewer connection is about 8 feet down. Digging and working in/around trenches that deep (or even 4-5 feet deep) can be extremely dangerous. I'd hire a pro for that portion if it were me.

When you have specific questions and are armed with more information, I'd be happy to try and help you with my limited knowledge.

Good Luck!
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:55 PM   #27
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I cannot begin to thank you enough for your response. I will study the terrylove.com plumbing forum before I ask any more questions, although you have answered many. Wouldn't have thought of the dryfitting vs glued joints - very smart. Like yourself, I have time and NO money. I will spend many, many hours reading before I attempt anything. Again, I greatly appreciate your time and thoughtful input.
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:39 PM   #28
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You are welcome.

Also a few other drain pipe sizes I didnt mention because I forgot you were doing a laundry.

Laundry stacks are 2" pipe.
Utility sinks also 2" as are kitchen sinks.
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:45 PM   #29
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You are welcome.

Also a few other drain pipe sizes I didnt mention because I forgot you were doing a laundry.

Laundry stacks are 2" pipe.
Utility sinks also 2" as are kitchen sinks.

JeepNick, since I plan to tie all the drains together, and the largest is the 3" or 4" for the toilet, I assume I will need to run the largest pipe size to the terminal at City sewage? Thanks a million for you help!!
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:54 PM   #30
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JeepNick, since I plan to tie all the drains together, and the largest is the 3" or 4" for the toilet, I assume I will need to run the largest pipe size to the terminal at City sewage? Thanks a million for you help!!
You'll have a main line that goes from the house to the city sewer. That line will be your 4" line (or whatever size you need, but I'd say min. 3-4"). In a perfect world, you'd run that line from the sewer straight to your toilet, then have other drains tie in later down the line using wye connections.

The slope or "drop per foot" is extremely important. Not enough and you get standing water and solids building up. Too much and your water will drain, but the solids will remain. Oooh, I rhymed!

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