DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   pvc pipe and footing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/pvc-pipe-footing-176783/)

Master Brian 04-10-2013 05:46 PM

pvc pipe and footing
 
Simply put, I need to run a very short length of 2" diameter PVC pipe through a footing for a 6 course high cement block retaining wall. The pipe is for a vent in a basement bathroom, the block is a retaining wall that I need to repair in my c1915 house.

Should I sleeve the PVC before I pour the concrete or is the concrete ok around the pipe? If it should be sleeved, what should I use? 3" or 4" PVC and just sort of 'float' it around the 2" pipe or should I wrap the pipe in some sort of foam/rubber....or something else??

Thanks!!

TheEplumber 04-10-2013 06:46 PM

I sleeve with bigger pipe. The vent should not be in contact with concrete- especially a footing.
I assume your location is good with the structural engineer/inspector? Going through footings is not always excepted.

joecaption 04-10-2013 07:07 PM

Going to need some picturea on this one.
Trying to figure out how a vent would be that low.

Javiles 04-10-2013 09:15 PM

Some codes require a sleeve 2 pipe size bigger than the service pipe. that presents a problem when going through a footing or tie beam, i would check what your local code allows.

Master Brian 04-10-2013 11:29 PM

I'll try to get pic posted, but for now the vent is coming from below what will be the new cement floor grade. It serves the bathtub only. Hopefully that somewhat explains why it's that low. It probably isn't as low as you might think being as it is a footing, but since I am trying to repair an existing block wall I am pouring the footing above flour grade to match some block that is a bit lower.

, the footing is coming up the height of a cement block and replacing one course of block. The footing also isn't very deep, only about 12" below floor grade, which matches existing footing.

Master Brian 04-10-2013 11:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1156436)
Going to need some picturea on this one.
Trying to figure out how a vent would be that low.

It's a horizontal section of pipe coming off the tubs drain, it will pass through the footing before going vertical and tying into the vent stack.

I hope this makes some sense.

COLDIRON 04-11-2013 05:53 AM

Always sleeve when going through a wall/foundation with a larger diameter pipe. Two good reasons 1. the sleeve prevents the wall from dropping and keeps the integrity of the wall. #2 if the pipe needs to be replaced at any time in the future you can do it easy plus if it needs up sizing for any reason . Just good common sense.

Alan 04-11-2013 09:19 AM

We wrap ours with a few layers of sill-foam when passing through any part of the concrete.

Master Brian 04-11-2013 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by COLDIRON (Post 1156680)
Always sleeve when going through a wall/foundation with a larger diameter pipe. Two good reasons 1. the sleeve prevents the wall from dropping and keeps the integrity of the wall. #2 if the pipe needs to be replaced at any time in the future you can do it easy plus if it needs up sizing for any reason . Just good common sense.

Not to sound argumentative, but...
1. I don't get how a larger diameter pipe would keep wall from dropping or making wall stronger, unless one used steel pipe. And 2. In my case I don't think it'll help future repairs. This is actually an interior to wall that retains dirt that the fireplace stack, which is through center of house, rests on. To do any future repairs concrete will have to be torn up and block wall likely torn out again....

That said I'll definitely encase the pipe in something to protect it and double up on steel rod around the area where the pipe goes through.

COLDIRON 04-11-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Master Brian (Post 1156827)
Not to sound argumentative, but...
1. I don't get how a larger diameter pipe would keep wall from dropping or making wall stronger, unless one used steel pipe. And 2. In my case I don't think it'll help future repairs. This is actually an interior to wall that retains dirt that the fireplace stack, which is through center of house, rests on. To do any future repairs concrete will have to be torn up and block wall likely torn out again....

That said I'll definitely encase the pipe in something to protect it and double up on steel rod around the area where the pipe goes through.

Steel sleeve yeah. Sounds like a bearing wall in the Center holding up the entire middle of the house. I didn't say anything about future repairs what I meant was if you need to up size the pipe or replace it in the future it will be easy with sleeve. Not to be short with you but I say do what ever you want. Good Luck.

jagans 04-11-2013 11:03 AM

Sleeve it with steel pipe two pipe sizes bigger, and stuff backerod or fiberglass in the remaining space. Don't ask pros then argue with them. Take a bat, hang a hula hoop around the bat with the bat centered in the hula hoop. Move the hula hoop down 6 inches. Did it hit the bat?

Master Brian 04-11-2013 03:50 PM

Again, sorry if it sounds like I was argueing, was not the intention. I totally get why it should be sleeveed and will most definately sleeve the pipe. I asked what I asked because I have read NOT to use steel pipe because it'll rust out. Hadn't seen anyone recommend steel until I brought it up.

Yes it's a bearing wall and thus very critcal to get it right. I don't feel it was done right years ago, when someone along the line either added or redid some blocking since they ran it up in columns, vs staggered. I have a mason that is going to stagger the joints, add verticle rebar in the cells and fill the cells with concrete. Over kill maybe, but I don't want it to ever be an issue and being as he's a neighbor and we exchange labor, the only cost to me is the steel and concrete!

I'm going to get him to come look again and see if the wall can be moved 4" closer to the stack and thus elimate the need for the vent to go through the footing all together.

TheEplumber 04-11-2013 04:06 PM

Steel or sch 40 plastic are both usually excepted for sleeving- the sleeve only needs to be strong enough not to collapse or deform during footing pour.
I normally use plastic. I use steel when the job specifications demand it.
The idea is to keep concrete from touching the pipe and allow for minor movement/expansion of the pipe or footing

Javiles 04-11-2013 07:26 PM

I will give you guys the reason behind the sleeve (the change in code) if anybody's really interested.

TheEplumber 04-11-2013 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Javiles (Post 1157191)
I will give you guys the reason behind the sleeve (the change in code) if anybody's really interested.

Na-I'm good :jester: Well. OK I'm curious now :thumbup:


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:06 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved