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Old 07-08-2013, 11:25 PM   #1
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PVC to Cast Iron circa 1985


Way back in 1985 I connected some new PVC DWV lines to cast iron hub fittings. At the time, the city required use of a special PVC fitting which had a bulge at the end larger than the standard pipe's outer diameter and resembled the spigot on standard cast iron hub and spigot piping. This was placed in the hub of the cast iron pipe, oakum was installed (just like for cast iron) and then shredded lead was packed into the space above the oakum. This was added in shallow layers and each was cold-worked and compressed with a lead forming tool or punch into a solid packing.

I was told at the time that some plumbers used the same system but instead of the shredded lead they used molten lead, which sometimes charred the PVC if heated too hot.

Today, there are other methods often using "rubber" seals. While the shredded lead system was time consuming, I installed several that have lasted 30 or more years and are still good as new. I understand that there are some concerns for how long the rubber in rubber sealed joints will last.

Does anyone else remember the "shredded lead" system and could anyone site a web page showing how this system worked?



I have not been able to find any information on this technique anywhere on the internet! Was it unique to Dayton, Ohio? I seriously doubt it since someone made the special PVC adapters.

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Old 07-09-2013, 09:22 AM   #2
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PVC to Cast Iron circa 1985


I looked a little too but only found images of completed joints.

I have used the lead wool and also poured lead against plastic, Pouring is faster, but as you stated, riskier.

Tyler has a system called Ty-seal- the rubber gaskets. http://www.tylerpipe.com/submittals/...pe/ty-seal.pdf
I have had to use it for underground waste piping for Corp of Engineer projects. We used pipe pullers or lead mallets fashioned from small coffee cans filled with lead and a #5 rebar handle to set the joints.
They would not except plastic pipe or cast iron no-hub underground. Above ground, CI no hub was allowed.
So, I guess if the Corp allowed the gaskets- they are a good product.
Now you can buy the gasket with a plastic pipe nipple attached for easy transition.

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Old 07-09-2013, 10:26 AM   #3
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PVC to Cast Iron circa 1985


Quote:
Originally Posted by Perry401 View Post
Way back (the dark ages) in 1985 I connected some new PVC DWV lines to cast iron hub fittings. ... Today, there are other methods often using "rubber" seals.
These existed and were used then too.

Quote:
I understand that there are some concerns for how long the rubber in rubber sealed joints will last.
Can you quote any formal cites?
Or is that just parts counter chatter?
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Old 07-15-2013, 01:57 PM   #4
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PVC to Cast Iron circa 1985


The lifetime of the rubber seals is "parts counter chatter". I know that most codes permit them to be used today. I just ran into someone who had never heard of the oakum shredded lead system, and I wanted to show them how it was done -- not just my personal accounts of how it was done.
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Old 07-15-2013, 02:09 PM   #5
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PVC to Cast Iron circa 1985


Quote:
Originally Posted by TarheelTerp View Post
These existed and were used then too.


Can you quote any formal cites?
Or is that just parts counter chatter?
The Rubber will last until it gets hard and dried out. Right now with the current mix that Fernco uses, it lasts usually around 25-30 years. Used to be that you could not get a Fernco fitting to last ten years, due to the mix they were using for their Rubber.
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