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Old 09-07-2005, 05:33 PM   #1
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Pressure Tank


I have old galvanized plumbing throughout our house that I am replacing with copper. Under the bathroom, the cold water runs into the bottom of a tank, about 50 gallons maybe, then out the top of the tank to the stub-up for the toilet. Can I take this tank out altogether without affecting the water pressure?
Also, any thoughts on PEX pipe instead of copper?

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Old 09-07-2005, 10:52 PM   #2
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I've been using Pex for years, crimped thousands of joints and never had a leak (touch wood). I love the stuff, doesn't matter if it's wet, you can move it around, cut it with a knife, and it's very hard to set things on fire with it. From your description I don't know what the tank might be doing, can't imagine it is necessary, but wait for a real plumber to let you know for sure.

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Old 09-12-2005, 08:47 PM   #3
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Well, I'm not a "real' plumber, but I've been DIYing it for about 50 years (an old geezer, nearing 63.LOL).
If you're on a well, that old galvanized tank may just be your old pressure tank.
If so, replace it with a good bladder-type pressure tank, like a Well-X.
The air pressure in a pressure tank should be 2 psi below your pump cut-on pressure (i.e. 18 for a 20-40 psi cut-on/cut-off, 28 psi for a 30-40). They come factory pre-pressurized, but double check it with a tire pressure gauge.
No problem.
And definitely go with PEX, as suggested by Bonus.
Good Luck!
Mike

Last edited by Mike Swearingen; 09-12-2005 at 08:49 PM.
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:39 PM   #4
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Pressure Tank


I'm not the plumber either but I'm 10 years behind Mike so i'll put in my 2 cents for what it's worth. Even before the badder tanks the pressure tanks had to have an air chamber on the top so the fact that there is H2O coming out of the top would lead me to believe it is not being used as a pressure tank. I'm guessing it maybe was at one time a pt or some type of storage.> Just as a side, I had a galvanized municipal service with good pressure but very little sustained flow. I put a bladder tank, a pressure regulator and backflow preventer on the system so i had 15 gallons available at 50 lbs. We could at least get one good shower or run a sprinkler zone. HS
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Old 09-14-2005, 11:16 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen
Well, I'm not a "real' plumber, but I've been DIYing it for about 50 years (an old geezer, nearing 63.LOL).
If you're on a well, that old galvanized tank may just be your old pressure tank.
If so, replace it with a good bladder-type pressure tank, like a Well-X.
The air pressure in a pressure tank should be 2 psi below your pump cut-on pressure (i.e. 18 for a 20-40 psi cut-on/cut-off, 28 psi for a 30-40). They come factory pre-pressurized, but double check it with a tire pressure gauge.
No problem.
And definitely go with PEX, as suggested by Bonus.
Good Luck!
Mike
I thought that pressure tanks were only for well systems so could it just be a remnant tank that was never disconnected?
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Old 09-14-2005, 12:59 PM   #6
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Pressure Tank


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen
Well, I'm not a "real' plumber, but I've been DIYing it for about 50 years (an old geezer, nearing 63.LOL).
If you're on a well, that old galvanized tank may just be your old pressure tank.
If so, replace it with a good bladder-type pressure tank, like a Well-X.
The air pressure in a pressure tank should be 2 psi below your pump cut-on pressure (i.e. 18 for a 20-40 psi cut-on/cut-off, 28 psi for a 30-40). They come factory pre-pressurized, but double check it with a tire pressure gauge.
No problem.
And definitely go with PEX, as suggested by Bonus.
Good Luck!
Mike
I see he mentioned being on a well already. The house is from 1952 in Anchorage, so it's a good bet it was the old well tank. I don't think I'll have any problem if I take it out and just run new water line to the bathroom fixtures. Thanks for the replies!

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