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Old 08-21-2013, 12:38 AM   #1
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Plumbing permit


Hey everyone,

I had a leak in my basement (pipes mostly exposed) and as the copper pipes were old I decided to upgrade to pex and install in a home run configuration using manifolds. To cut a long story short, the leak happened late Friday evening. I shut off the water and headed to my local permit office to obtain a permit to complete the pex installation. The office was closed for the weekend and I had to complete the work that weekend as I had no water, so I proceeded following the manufacturers installation guide. I emailed the permit office asking for anything that I need to be aware of. They emailed me back telling me that there isn't a code for pex installation, and just to follow the manufactures installation guide.
I have completed the work and now want to obtain a permit to have it inspected. My concern is that if something is wrong, what's the worst case for me? I am currently using the pex installation without any issues. I just want someone to inspect it to ensure that I did everything correctly. My concern is that they will cut off my water if anything is wrong until fixed. I have no problem fixing anything as I want it to be correct, but hope you understand that I don't want my water cut off, or get into trouble for completing the work before getting a permit (I did try)...
Thoughts? I hope that I'm over thinking this and just need to get the permit, and arrange inspection. Then hope for a successful inspection.

I appreciate anyone taking the time to respond.

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Old 08-21-2013, 12:50 AM   #2
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...I emailed the permit office asking for anything that I need to be aware of. They emailed me back telling me that there isn't a code for pex installation, and just to follow the manufactures installation guide...
Sounds like your local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) gave you all you needed to know in their response. If, for personal comfort, you want them to come over and check it out, then do so.

If you sized it the same way that it was originally, then you should be good to go.

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Old 08-21-2013, 12:57 AM   #3
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Plumbing permit


Thanks, VIPlumber. I appreciate your quick response. It's almost the same as it was. The only big difference is that I now have 2 manifolds for the Pex - installed per the installation guide, and I soldered sweat adapters onto any copper pipes that are buried in the walls/ceiling for my main floor fixtures (I didn't want to remove the walls just to remove all copper piping).

Should I get the permit and then arrange the inspection, or should I just have the inspection arranged at the same time as obtaining the permit (will they have a problem with me completing the work before getting the permit?)
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Old 08-21-2013, 01:10 AM   #4
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Get the permit and arrange for the inspection while you're there. I imagine you've completed all the work?
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Old 08-21-2013, 10:28 AM   #5
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Plumbing permit


I was told by my local inspector hear in the Twin Cities when he was out inspecting another job that in order for me to install pex myself I had to pass a certification course. He said the big box stores occasionally have these classes. I was looking to use an expander for a future project and the big box stores only teach the crimper, which is all they sell.

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Old 08-21-2013, 12:59 PM   #6
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If you have to pull a permit to do a job thhan usually because its out of the ho league especially plumbing.. Plumbers go through rigorous training and schooling for 4 years like any other professional.. the big box stores make it seem easy but when codes are involved and proper sizing for proper distribution than its best to leave to the pros.. I would never pretend to be a lawyer or an accountant or a doctor, yes there are small plumbing jobs a handy person can do but repipes,roughs,venting,gas and a host of others are not for amateurs..this is just my opinion but ive seen lots of ho jobs go very bad and cost double of what it would have in the beginning so dont take it the wrong way..good luck in your project.
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Old 08-21-2013, 09:18 PM   #7
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Personally have no experience with pex, but i would imagine the concern is having something come apart, distribution and sizing. you could call out a privet inspector not sure if you have them in your area, not a home inspector but a certified plumbing inspector around here will cost about 125.00 for a walk through. or a reputable plumbing outfit with experience in that type of work they may or may not see a problem near or far.
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Old 08-21-2013, 11:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beepster View Post
I was told by my local inspector hear in the Twin Cities when he was out inspecting another job that in order for me to install pex myself I had to pass a certification course. He said the big box stores occasionally have these classes. I was looking to use an expander for a future project and the big box stores only teach the crimper, which is all they sell.

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Strange requirement. Here we have home owner permits. AS a working plumbing inspector I would be tickled pink to help when home owners pull permits. The process they are explaining doesn't seem to encourage inspections.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:17 AM   #9
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Strange requirement. Here we have home owner permits. AS a working plumbing inspector I would be tickled pink to help when home owners pull permits. The process they are explaining doesn't seem to encourage inspections.
Im a bit perplexed by your statement especially coming from a veteran plumber and inspector. The main goal is to make sure the job is done correctly and to code certainly not to encourage inspections to appease the municipalities,thats the reason why we pull permits for jobs in the first place. its a safeguard to make sure everything is done up to professional standards by your logic than ho should tackle their plumbing on their own and you would help them do so... Seems like your not doing right to the ho and your fellow plumbers..we also have ho permits in my state and it gives the ho a false sense that important items such as plumbing can be accomplished by novices..
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:31 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostmaker View Post
Strange requirement. Here we have home owner permits. AS a working plumbing inspector I would be tickled pink to help when home owners pull permits. The process they are explaining doesn't seem to encourage inspections.
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Originally Posted by Peppe1019 View Post
Im a bit perplexed by your statement especially coming from a veteran plumber and inspector. The main goal is to make sure the job is done correctly and to code certainly not to encourage inspections to appease the municipalities,thats the reason why we pull permits for jobs in the first place. its a safeguard to make sure everything is done up to professional standards by your logic than ho should tackle their plumbing on their own and you would help them do so... Seems like your not doing right to the ho and your fellow plumbers..we also have ho permits in my state and it gives the ho a false sense that important items such as plumbing can be accomplished by novices..
I'm not. Why shouldn't a public employee be happy to assist a tax payer when they have questions/concerns? This is a DIY site and sometimes the question and answer conversations leads to a homeowner feeling confident and tackling a project ( legally I might add) and sometimes the comfort level is not there and leads to contracting out a job.

From looking for some quotes for contracting out some plumbing work, the plumbers I have talked to don't feel threatened by me completing some of the work and them completing other portions. All done under permit of course.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:54 AM   #11
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Not sure if I explained right. Home owners can pull their own permits and do their own work here. You just need to be slightly certified to install pex as a homeowner.

That particular plumbing inspector was a jackass also, so i would need to confirm with the city.

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Old 08-22-2013, 10:33 AM   #12
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I'm not. Why shouldn't a public employee be happy to assist a tax payer when they have questions/concerns? This is a DIY site and sometimes the question and answer conversations leads to a homeowner feeling confident and tackling a project ( legally I might add) and sometimes the comfort level is not there and leads to contracting out a job.

From looking for some quotes for contracting out some plumbing work, the plumbers I have talked to don't feel threatened by me completing some of the work and them completing other portions. All done under permit of course.
While it is ok to help out which i do on this site i am saying that plumbing is a learned trade which takes years of school and on the job training which clearly ho dont have. Yes there are small jobs a ho can def tackle im not argiung that my argument is that large type jobs such as replacements should be kept to the pros.. I dont feel threatned and neither does any pther plumber obviously just like a lawyer wouldnt be threatend if i repersented my self in a case its the same, you have a profession can i got to a diy site and learn how to do your job! Thats my point im not trying to ruffle feathers im just stating facts according to what i see in my home state, most of the time projects like the one you are taclking lead to larger problems..
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Old 08-22-2013, 11:03 AM   #13
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Plumbing used to be much more complicated than it has become these days. If it was still all cast iron and galvanized I bet there would be far less DIY enthusiasts.
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Old 08-22-2013, 01:12 PM   #14
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I understand your point but plumbing is not easy sorry... If it is than maybe some non plumbers can answer this easy question without researching it..please remember im posting this is for some fun enjoy..
If i install a sewer in your home and the run is 130' at 1/8 of slope from your home to the street and the invert elevation at the street is 6'2" what is the invert elevation at your home?

Last edited by Peppe1019; 08-22-2013 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 08-22-2013, 02:41 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Peppe1019 View Post
I understand your point but plumbing is not easy sorry... If it is than maybe some non plumbers can answer this easy question without researching it..please remember im posting this is for some fun enjoy..
If i install a sewer in your home and the run is 130' at 1/8 of slope from your home to the street and the invert elevation at the street is 6'2" what is the invert elevation at your home?
I bet there are some professional plumbers that would have to research that issue...

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