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-   -   'plumbing goop' a fix? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/plumbing-goop-fix-37094/)

wombosi 01-28-2009 09:47 PM

'plumbing goop' a fix?
 
So, I've just finished a very intense plumbing job in my new bathroom. Put in toilet, sink, old tub back in, sweated a million joints, all leak free. shutoff valves all leak free.

Long story short, with the tub supplies, I wound up threading on a 3/4" female thread to 1/2" copper pipe adapter, right onto the male nipples of the faucet in back of the tub. I double tefloned it, then cranked them both down very hard. Then I dry fitting on the 90s, the vertical copper pipes, and all the rest of it to the floor (by a very circuitous route).

Turned everything back on, little droplets coming out of BOTH of the copper threaded adapters, right at the faucet nipples.

Now, I knew this was basically "for keeps" sweating everything on like that.
So, rather than try to cut pipes and unsweat and make a huge headache, I decided to slather the leaky areas with "plumbers goop." This is some semi hard curing epoxy, silicony like stuff that I used on my overflow plate on the tub.

I've just drained the lines and applied it, so waiting overnight before I turn water back on.

Will this work? Can I basically feel confident it will keep the leak at bay?

I have a Strom faucet, ordered "bathcock couplings" from Sig. Hardware, was told they would fit, they don't. Strom and Sig HArdware both highly unpleasant to deal with. Can't get a straight answer from anyone.
I've been all over town and to all the plumbers and supply houses. No one had anything that would work. I didn't want to use the leaky compression fittings on the cheap supply lines I had.

So, in no mood to do it any other way, at this point. But of course I need it to stop leaking.

PUlled off the tub drain! Someone gave me an old 1 3/8" drain assembly, and I yanked the whole "T" off of that, used the nuts and washers it came with. THen I had to use reducing washers on the 1 1/4" bit going into the ABS in the floor.
A HUGE hassle, and I learned an enormous amount of plumbing skills.

I will never deal with Strom PLumbing again, or Signature Hardware, and I will likely never deal with a clawfoot tub again, if I can help it.

Grazie

Termite 01-28-2009 11:57 PM

I really want to give you a positive answer....:whistling2:

Plumbers goop is pretty awesome versatile stuff (and it smells great :laughing:). Buuuuut, I seriously doubt that it would be a good long-term fix for supply plumbing. It might hold for days, weeks, or even months, but that leak will find its way out.

Nothing more frustrating than the position you're in. I've been there for sure. But you'll end up regretting relying on this stuff to keep the supply plumbing from leaking.

wombosi 01-29-2009 07:10 AM

so what can i do? is there any way to just crank down harder on those copper adapters and stop the leak? is it because the copper threads are tapered and the pipe threads are not?

I could maybe get an adapter and use those bathcock couplings, but then my lines would be hitting the toilet (yes, it's that tight.)

what about taking them off and laying on some pipe dope?

thanks.

wombosi 01-29-2009 07:16 AM

what about heating up the first joint at the street 90 below the adapter, then just trying to tighten it some more?
how tight should it be?
it this a connection that can ever be leak proof, no matter how hard i torque it down?

thanks.

brokenknee 01-29-2009 07:55 AM

If you want it done right you are going to have to start over. You said you double wrapped the fittings with teflon tape. Does that mean you went around the pipe twice? I usually wrap the threads about four times. Also make sure you keep the tape nice and tight around the threads.

It is possible that you received some bad fittings. About twenty years ago I worked for a city that had its own gas company. Spent the summer re-plumbing gas meters. We received a shipment of street elbows that had a very high failure rate. At first the old guys (I was young then) blamed it on the younger guys (we had slightly more problems with them). Once they started experiencing a high failure rate, management sent the fittings back and got a new shipment. Problem solved.

Your idea of heating the fitting to tighten the pipe will not work. If you want to try to tighten the fitting more you will have to take the joint apart. If you do that you might as well replace the fitting.

RippySkippy 01-29-2009 08:23 AM

I'd NEVER trust a fix like that for a long term solution...for an emergency sure why not...burried in a wall for the long term...no way.

Cut your pipe where ever it's convienent, sweat in a union. re-work your threaded fittings and re-install.

On the thread fitting...besides wrapping like Brokenknee suggests...I ALWAYS apply pipe dope on top of the Teflon tape after getting that suggestion right here in River City from Ron the Plumber, whom I thank EVERY time I do this and it holds the first time.....THANKS AGAIN RON! Check it out for your self.....http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/teflon...ipe-dope-3726/ It might be over kill, but even on the union, I put pipe dope on those threads as well. It keeps them lubricated when tightening and that small bit of lubrication makes it WAY easier to really snug them up well.

Termite 01-29-2009 08:55 AM

I have a hard time believing that the threads aren't tapered. That would be a very odd circumstance and I find it unlikely. Either way, tightening it down more probably isn't going to stop a leak, and might cause more problems.

On a 3/4" threaded fitting I usually give at least 5 wraps of teflon tape. Two wraps is not enough. Pipe dope is another good option, and some guys combine it with teflon tape.

Re-heating the soldered joints is not a great thing to do. That'll just increase the chance of a leak at the heated joint.

Unfortunately, you're going to have to take it apart.

4just1don 01-29-2009 09:49 AM

If they are indeed straight threads rather than tapered,,,it isnt gonna work. Straight threads seal as a compression. See if you can find a straight thread on one end and tapered on the other,,adapter if you will. Try a Napa store,,I think there is a hydralic fitting that will do that!! Anybody that 'makes' hyralic hoses. Straight threads are a witch!!! BTW,,,I was always told if 2 wraps of teflon tape wont hold it from leaking,,,ten wont either!! I find OVER 2 wraps of teflon tape 'sometimes' make them leak worse

DUDE! 01-29-2009 04:36 PM

interesting thoughts on the sealing. I've heard also that using more then a couple wraps of teflon tape will do more bad then good. Have heard and seen using the tape in conjunction with pipe dope.

brokenknee 01-29-2009 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DUDE! (Post 221557)
interesting thoughts on the sealing. I've heard also that using more then a couple wraps of teflon tape will do more bad then good. Have heard and seen using the tape in conjunction with pipe dope.


Has not been my experience, main thing keep the tape tight when wrapping the threads. Yes you can wrap it to many times, but loose tape is more of a problem. I personally like 3 to 4 wraps.

I have heard of the pipe dope / Teflon combination. I personally do not think it is necessary. Use one or the other and make sure you tighten properly. Tape only on PVC, CPVC and ABS fitting, no dope.

RippySkippy 01-30-2009 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brokenknee (Post 221578)
I have heard of the pipe dope / Teflon combination. I personally do not think it is necessary. Use one or the other and make sure you tighten properly. Tape only on PVC, CPVC and ABS fitting, no dope.

I respectfully disagree.

I've always had hit/miss luck getting tape alone to seal...unless I tightened the fittings REALLY tight, which I don't like to to do. The combo of tape and dope seals well with out having to over-tighten the fitting. I can't remember the last time I had a leak using the tape/dope method.

If you've not done it...you should try it...for the slight cost in money and time, why not do it?

brokenknee 01-30-2009 08:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RippySkippy (Post 221848)
I respectfully disagree.

I've always had hit/miss luck getting tape alone to seal...unless I tightened the fittings REALLY tight, which I don't like to to do. The combo of tape and dope seals well with out having to over-tighten the fitting. I can't remember the last time I had a leak using the tape/dope method.

If you've not done it...you should try it...for the slight cost in money and time, why not do it?


I have tried it, just seams like an extra unnecessary messy step. I have not had a problem with the tape.

As you state the cost is not even a factor, if it works for you keep doing it. :thumbsup:

mrpurty 03-19-2009 08:23 AM

i just had a similar problem. threaded copper connections to my brass shower valve had a slow leak (about a drop ever couple of hours). i had used regular white teflon tape. after reading this thread i took it about, used the thicker pink teflon tape and pipe dope on top of the tape, and it worked perfectly. thanks!

Tommy2 03-19-2009 10:57 AM

I always use liquid teflon tape. I hate teflon tape.
Ive learned the hard way that it takes about 4 wraps to get a good seal.

And I would never puta ny type of "goop" or epoxy on a plumbing job. For something on a car..maybe. JB Weld is pretty good stuff.

kenmac 03-19-2009 08:45 PM

I like the pipe lubricant in a can.... To each his own & what ever works for them ..But, I'am no tape fan


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