Plumbing - Distance Between Hot And Cold Pipes - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing


CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-26-2013, 01:04 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Lightbulb

Plumbing - distance between hot and cold pipes


Hi All,
Thanks for reading this post. I want to do some moving of my copper pipes, and if I could, I would run the hot and cold pipes parallel to each other with only an inch distance apart from each other. Is this ok, or is there a recommended distance that I should follow?
Best,
Mark

Advertisement

markew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 01:32 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


You will be fine. BTW, why though so close? Usually you have about a 12" separation.

Advertisement

gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
markew (11-26-2013)
Old 11-26-2013, 06:45 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,626
Rewards Points: 2,168
Default


The only thing is, if you are servicing them in the future (adding a line, shutoff, fixing a leak, etc) you might have a bit of a hard time with another pipe so close.
SPS-1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SPS-1 For This Useful Post:
markew (11-26-2013)
Old 11-26-2013, 10:05 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Hi, and thanks for the answer. You wrote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
BTW, why though so close? Usually you have about a 12" separation.
Well, I'm replacing a drop ceiling with a higher drywall one. The pipes are right below the ceiling's beams, so I want to push them back toward the wall as far as possible. If I put them right next to each other, it will allow me to push them farther out of the way.
markew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 11:22 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Then use PEX.
gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
markew (11-26-2013)
Old 11-26-2013, 01:36 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Default


Interesting, GZ, I'll have to look into that. I suppose I could drill holes into the beams to run the PEX through them, and that way I'd have a flat ceiling with no compromise.
markew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 02:38 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 368
Rewards Points: 336
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
The only thing is, if you are servicing them in the future (adding a line, shutoff, fixing a leak, etc) you might have a bit of a hard time with another pipe so close.
Yep. Imagine trying to cut a pipe with another pipe only 1 inch away.
JKeefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 07:11 AM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Midget tubing cutter


Name:  SelfFeedingTubingCutter_4.jpg
Views: 176
Size:  12.6 KB use this in tight areas to work with copper pipe

Advertisement

Toothless is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Toothless For This Useful Post:
markew (10-23-2014)
Reply

Tags
copper , pipe connection , plumbing


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

 

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1