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vladens 04-17-2013 06:26 PM

Plumbing diagram - is it ok?
 
Hello, again!
So, I'm planning on putting a bathroom in my basement including installing a a sewer ejector pit & pump. I've come up with a rough plan and would like to ask you all what you think about it. Constructive criticism is welcome.

http://cycle-planet.com/exchange/ebay/vld/plmubing.jpg


This is my 1st time drawing diagram like this, so please don't judge my drawing skills :)
Does general layout look ok? Can I use sanitary cross for 4" pipe where sink & laundry will drain to? What type of 90 degree connectors should I use going from vertical to horizontal runs?
Anything else I should know?
Thanks.

TheEplumber 04-17-2013 07:24 PM

You did good with the drawing :thumbsup:
I'm going to throw some corrections out there based on UPC. We don't know your location so it's hard to say for sure what your inspector will want-
For beginners, the cross is illegal like that. Best to use two wye's w/45's
No 4" pipe is needed, use 3" instead. That will change your reducers to 1 3x2 to the shower.
A lot of areas don't allow flat vents like you have on the toilet and shower, however, I do it often when grade dictates it. Be sure they roll off above the center line of the drain.
For the 90's- you can't go wrong with long sweeps.
The shower vent can be 1.5" Toilet is 2", horizontal vent is also 2"
Vertical lav vent is 1.5"
Laundry is all wrong- treat your vent as the drain and install your p trap min. 6" above the floor. Then continue the vent line over to the others.
Pump needs a 2" vent
Pump sewage line needs a check valve and a gate or ball valve
The pump line should tie into the existing horizontal line from the top- not vertical.

There, that'll get the conversation rolling :) I'm sure some of the other plumbers here will give their opinions too.

vladens 04-17-2013 09:11 PM

Thanks a LOT for the reply!

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
Laundry is all wrong- treat your vent as the drain and install your p trap min. 6" above the floor. Then continue the vent line over to the others.

I was planning to install one of those in-wall hook-up panel, like this:
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...m/laundry1.jpg
So, I should just hide the p-trap behind the wall as well?

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
No 4" pipe is needed, use 3" instead. That will change your reducers to 1 3x2 to the shower.

The reason I'm using 4" pipe is because the sewer basin/pump assembly I purchased from Menards has a 4" entry/opening on the side. LINK

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
A lot of areas don't allow flat vents like you have on the toilet and shower, however, I do it often when grade dictates it. Be sure they roll off above the center line of the drain.

My drawing proportions aren't very accurate, they're gonna be much shorter. But still, WC is about 13" away from unfinished wall; how do I avoid horizontal run there?

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
Pump sewage line needs a check valve and a gate or ball valve
The pump line should tie into the existing horizontal line from the top- not vertical.

Check valve was included with the pump kit, I'll just need to get ball valve then. And yes, it was the plan for the line to enter main stack from top (on the angle), I forgot to put that in the drawing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
The shower vent can be 1.5" Toilet is 2", horizontal vent is also 2"
Vertical lav vent is 1.5"

I'm a little confused by this.... so, lav and shower should start with 1.5" but then turn into 2" because horizontal has to be 2". Why not use all 2" than? Is there good reason or is it just a recommended minimum?

TheEplumber 04-18-2013 01:00 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by vladens (Post 1161548)
Thanks a LOT for the reply!

I was planning to install one of those in-wall hook-up panel, like this:
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n...m/laundry1.jpg
So, I should just hide the p-trap behind the wall as well?

Pipe the washer like the image I attached
Quote:

Originally Posted by vladens (Post 1161548)
The reason I'm using 4" pipe is because the sewer basin/pump assembly I purchased from Menards has a 4" entry/opening on the side. LINK

That's fine but you could use a short piece of 4" at the basin, then reduce to 3" after a couple feet

Quote:

Originally Posted by vladens (Post 1161548)
My drawing proportions aren't very accurate, they're gonna be much shorter. But still, WC is about 13" away from unfinished wall; how do I avoid horizontal run there?

The horizontal vent is OK per my inspector due to structural conditions(slab).

Quote:

Originally Posted by vladens (Post 1161548)
Check valve was included with the pump kit, I'll just need to get ball valve then. And yes, it was the plan for the line to enter main stack from top (on the angle), I forgot to put that in the drawing.

Put the valves outside the basin for future access.

Quote:

Originally Posted by vladens (Post 1161548)
I'm a little confused by this.... so, lav and shower should start with 1.5" but then turn into 2" because horizontal has to be 2". Why not use all 2" than? Is there good reason or is it just a recommended minimum?

Recommended minimum.
Pipes are sized by Fixture Units and each fixture is sized also. A shower and lav can be on a 1.5" vent. However, a toilet must be on a 2" vent, so the vent needs to be increased at the toilet. All 3 fixtures can still be served by a 2" vent based on their combined Fixture Units. The washer will even fit on the 2"

vladens 04-18-2013 07:02 AM

Thanks again! I will do as you advised.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161733)
Put the valves outside the basin for future access.

Is there a recommended height for the check valve? I was thinking to put it as high as possible to reduce the amount of waste water that will sit above the valve (hopefully that would make the valve shutting less noisy)

hammerlane 04-18-2013 07:09 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I dont know if there are any dimensions to your drawing, but the fact that the toilet and shower look a distance away from a nearby wall it appears you will have flat vents before you get to a wat to turn vertical

vladens 04-18-2013 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammerlane (Post 1161801)
I dont know if there are any dimensions to your drawing, but the fact that the toilet and shower look a distance away from a nearby wall it appears you will have flat vents before you get to a wat to turn vertical

Thanks! No, my proportions are all off here. It's going to be the standard distance off the wall.
This just a quick 15-minute sketch up, that's why it's not perfect... :)

vladens 04-18-2013 10:02 AM

Does this look better?

http://cycle-planet.com/exchange/eba...ubing_corr.jpg


Still seems like there will be very short flat vent from WC and shower, unless the long 90 is long enough to reach all the way to the wall?! I guess I'll find out when I'll be doing it.

Beepster 04-18-2013 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161431)
A lot of areas don't allow flat vents like you have on the toilet and shower, however, I do it often when grade dictates it. Be sure they roll off above the center line of the drain.

On my last below grade rough in inspection, I did get nicked for having my vents come off at less than a 45 degree angle. It wasn't flat by no means, just not 45 or higher.

B

TheEplumber 04-18-2013 10:49 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Beepster (Post 1161897)
On my last below grade rough in inspection, I did get nicked for having my vents come off at less than a 45 degree angle. It wasn't flat by no means, just not 45 or higher.

B

When I am limited by elevation or I exceed maximum trap arm length from a partition, I vent this way-which all my inspectors except

vladens 04-18-2013 10:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161922)
When I am limited by elevation or I exceed maximum trap arm length from a partition, I vent this way-which all my inspectors except

Oh, great! This helps a lot!

Beepster 04-18-2013 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1161922)
When I am limited by elevation or I exceed maximum trap arm length from a partition, I vent this way-which all my inspectors except

I recognize that picture from the Stanley 'How to' book I bought at HD.

Eplumb, I ask this for the benefit of the OP, is it OK to flatten out (get less than 45 degrees) the vent like that before it gets above the flood plane of the item it is venting?

B

TheEplumber 04-18-2013 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beepster (Post 1162016)
I recognize that picture from the Stanley 'How to' book I bought at HD.

Eplumb, I ask this for the benefit of the OP, is it OK to flatten out (get less than 45 degrees) the vent like that before it gets above the flood plane of the item it is venting?

B

These are the kind of questions plumbers argue about during coffee breaks :)
The best answer I can give is that it depends on your inspector. We do it quite often in my area though.
Ideally, you want to avoid any horizontal venting below the flood rim.

Big N8 04-18-2013 01:50 PM

Great discussion here. Good to see what other are doing with odd venting situations.

vladens 04-23-2013 11:09 AM

Thanks again everyone for the answers.

I have one more question that I hope to get answer to without creating new thread. I dug the hole yesterday for the sewer pit, and noticed right away a little bit of water seeping through the ground. This morning the hole was almost half-way full. OK, I'll pump it out but do I need to do anything to prevent the water from coming there?


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