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Old 03-17-2013, 09:06 AM   #1
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I have an L shaped base board heater I removed a wall n need to take out the heater that was by that wall. I'm cutting both ends so I can connect them with pipe under my floor. My question is if I turn the heat off will that drain the pipes for me. If not how do I empty the pipe out. I'm using the quick connects that u slide over the copper pipe n using the pec pipe. Just need to know best way to drain water so I don't ruin sheet rock below

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Old 03-17-2013, 09:18 AM   #2
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not really familiar with those systems, but whenever we need to empty out a small section of pipe in an area that may get damaged by water we use a large wet vac, again depending on the situation this may or not work for you,

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Old 03-17-2013, 09:23 AM   #3
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The water will need to be drained. Shutting off the unit does not drain the water. Then you will need to refill the lines and bleed all the air out.
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Old 03-17-2013, 09:39 AM   #4
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How do I drain it
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:44 AM   #5
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That depends on boiler and how it's setup. You already turned off boiler, now you have to turn the water off feeding it. Look and see if it has an automactic fill valve, it may or may not have i don't know. Also could you please post some pics. I'm just guessing how the boiler is setup. It will look something like this; see link

link here

Turn that off. If boiler has isolation valves that would be great, then you can just drain that section your working on and it will be easier to bleed later on. If not, there should be a drain spout by base of boiler somewhere. Hook garden hose to it and drain boiler.

Even though the boiler will be drained and psi will be 0, you will still have some water that will come out when you cut the pipe, just be prepared for that. Like javiles suggested he uses a wetvac. Have some towels, rags, mop, or something ready so you don't ruin sheetrock. Sometimes there are bleeders right on the baseboard open them up as well. However, there will still be a small amount of water still left in the pipe.
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:16 AM   #6
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There are quick connects for hot water basebaord? Can he use Brass Sharkbites on BB hot water?

Thanks.
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:17 AM   #7
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Old 03-17-2013, 12:22 PM   #8
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Your welcome. Glad it worked out for you.

Personally, I would not use sharbite or any kind of quick connect on a hot water baseboard. I have used them for other plumbing situations, and they are great, quick, easy, and no sweating involved. However, in situations like this, I would use old fashion solder/sweating on baseboard heating. Some of those boilers get that water over 200 degrees.

That's just my opinion, other plumbers do use them for just about everything these days. I would not use them in this situation. Stay tuned, see what other plumbers say about them.

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Old 03-17-2013, 12:52 PM   #9
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Thanks Jmon, That was my thinking also, but I did not know that HW boiler temp got that high. I thought it was like 170 max.
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Old 03-17-2013, 04:08 PM   #10
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170 or 180 is the normal max. 200 is getting too close to boiling. Also make sure the pex is suitable for that water temp if you use it. I would use copper myself and solder it.
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Old 03-17-2013, 05:11 PM   #11
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They say the orange plastic pipe is even stronger then copper one guy was telling me it was tested at over 300 degree water but I'm thinking about using the shark bite connectors n using a peice of copper rather then the plastic pipe. The connectors r fine to use with copper. If I try to hear n sodder then I'd have to open basement up to have room.
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Old 03-17-2013, 05:12 PM   #12
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jagans, joed,

Exactly, ideally, that's what it should be 170/180 max. Personally, I've been in homes where the homeowners have turned their aquastats on the bolier up to 200 degrees, I was just referring to some of my personal experience in the field. Sorry for any misinformation.
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:22 PM   #13
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Not sure about the orange plastic pex pipe. Like joed said, just make sure it's suitable for that water temp and pressure. If sweating is not an option for u, your idea of using sharkbite connectors and copper pipe seems like the next best thing. Like jagans recommended, use the brass o-ring not plastic or rubber. Not what I would do, but then again I'm not in your shoes. Just be careful and safe because like this forum says upfront, u assume all risks and responsibility of the outcome. Good luck to you, please share your experience with the forum and let us know how it worked out for you. Thanks.

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Old 03-17-2013, 06:40 PM   #14
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Water can reach way over 212 without boiling under pressure. We all know that from cars that overheat and noobs that pull off the radiator cap and scald the heck out of themselves. I hope the OP keeps his eye on his aquastat. The weak link is going to be the plastic and rubber O-Ring in a shark bite. Im sure he will use the brass ones.

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