Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-28-2012, 11:53 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Columbus Indiana
Posts: 90
Share |
Default

Pex Plumbing


Im sure this question has been asked but the search feature keeps coming back with Nothing, that it cant find any topics containing PEX.

I currently have Galvanized pipe in my house. It was built in 1911. We are becoming tired of the rust flakes in the water faucets.

I have seen 4 ways of using pex pipe. First is the shark bite. I dont care for this idea. Second is the complete compresstion ring. Third is the stainless steel crimp ring that leaves a tab. ( Ive delt with these under the name Oetiker). And Lastly, the system where you expand the pipe and slide the fitting into the pipe and let it shrink back down.

I have 2 bathrooms, kitchen, water heater, water softener, 3 spigots, and a washer to re-plumb.

What system would be better? I plan to be here for a very long time.

Can you insulate the hot water line with the Copper foam doodle things?

Also would it benefit me to run 3/4 to all my water sources or is 1/2 plenty?

Right now its all 3/4 inch. The supply line from the city is 3/4 galvanized as well. And every quote i have received has been well over $2500 to dig 4 feet down and install 90 feet of new Pex pipe.

Mr Smiley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 11:59 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,855
Default

Pex Plumbing


Both the slide on and the crimps work fine, the tool to expand it just cost a whole lot more to buy.
Run 3/4 main line and 1/2 for your supplys.

One way to get around having to change the outside line may be to just add a whole house water filter in the main incoming line.

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
jaydevries (04-28-2012)
Old 04-28-2012, 01:40 PM   #3
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 748
Default

Pex Plumbing


Mr Smiley,

The inside diameter (ID) of 3/4" copper pipe is 3/4". The ID of the fittings for copper pipe is also 3/4" so there are no flow restrictions introduced by the copper fittings.

The ID of 3/4" PEX is 5/8". In PEX systems using the crimp or cinch connections, the ID of the fittings are even smaller than 5/8", probably about 1/2" though I don't have one to measure.

OTOH, the wirsbo/Uponor PEX system uses the expansion method for fittings so the ID of the fittings are about the same as the ID of the PEX tubing. This results in smooth 5/8" flow all the way through the system without the flow restrictions and turbulence that smaller ID fittings introduce.

If you're planning to run a trunk & branch system and using 3/4" PEX for the trunks, the above might be a consideration for you.

PS: The search engine on this forum is very poor and does not find searches of 3 letters. Do a google search on this website using (without the leading dots):
..... PEX site:www.diychatroom.com
and you will have better success.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 04-29-2012 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Re-worded first two paragraphs for better clarity.
Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 05:27 PM   #4
moderator
 
TheEplumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,595
Default

Pex Plumbing


As a rule of thumb, no more then 2 fixtures on a 1/2" line. Your existing water pressure, and a couple of other factors, will determine exactly what size of pipe is needed.
Most plumbers, myself included, in my area have been using crimp or cinch rings for years. I see no benefit to switch and use another system.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
TheEplumber is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 06:10 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: pa
Posts: 4,263
Default

Pex Plumbing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Smiley View Post
Im sure this question has been asked but the search feature keeps coming back with Nothing, that it cant find any topics containing PEX.

I currently have Galvanized pipe in my house. It was built in 1911. We are becoming tired of the rust flakes in the water faucets.

I have seen 4 ways of using pex pipe. First is the shark bite. I dont care for this idea. Second is the complete compresstion ring. Third is the stainless steel crimp ring that leaves a tab. ( Ive delt with these under the name Oetiker). And Lastly, the system where you expand the pipe and slide the fitting into the pipe and let it shrink back down.

I have 2 bathrooms, kitchen, water heater, water softener, 3 spigots, and a washer to re-plumb.

What system would be better? I plan to be here for a very long time.

Can you insulate the hot water line with the Copper foam doodle things?

Also would it benefit me to run 3/4 to all my water sources or is 1/2 plenty?

Right now its all 3/4 inch. The supply line from the city is 3/4 galvanized as well. And every quote i have received has been well over $2500 to dig 4 feet down and install 90 feet of new Pex pipe.
well i can agree with all the answers so far ..if house has galvinized water line...how long do you think its going last....perhaps before you repipe the inside ..why not do the in comming line 1st...if your are willing to tackle the inside..why not the outside....sub out the digging.. install new line ...just my thougth... oh and by the way we use wirsbo pex...expander tool with rings....have been using it for yrs..great...

Last edited by ben's plumbing; 04-29-2012 at 07:32 AM.
ben's plumbing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2012, 11:27 PM   #6
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 748
Default

Pex Plumbing


Quote:
Originally Posted by ben's plumbing View Post
well i can agree with all the answers so far ..if house has galvinized water line...how long do you think its going last....perhaps before you repipe the inside ..why not do the in comming line 1st...if your are willing to tackle the inside..why not the outside....sub out the digging.. install new line ...just my thougth... oh and buy the way we use wirsbo pex...expander tool with rings....have been using it for yrs..great...
Good point Ben! Since the incoming line is galvanized (since 1911), the OP will probably still see rust flakes even if he re-plumbs his house using PEX. "ALL" galvanized pipes need to be replaced to get contamination free water.

HRG
Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Homerepairguy For This Useful Post:
ben's plumbing (04-29-2012)
Old 05-01-2012, 06:05 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Columbus Indiana
Posts: 90
Default

Pex Plumbing


I want to do it all. I can get to 90% of all the first floor plumbing, so a trunk line should be fairly easy. So i would do a 3/4" trunk and have 1/2" lins running off to, the toilet, bathroom sink, kitchen sink, ice maker and dishwasher. Would i want to supply the dishwasher with 1/2" or 3/4"? We will also be replacing up to 3 water spigits.

Right now I have 1/2" (Maybe a size smaller?) copper roll line going to the second floor tieing back into galvanized. This line supplies our shower, toilet, sink, washer and a seperate garden tub that we dont use. (I do not trust the install of this tub.)

I would like to do the incoming line first. But im not sure if the quotes i have received are too high or not? I know my brother in law got his incoming line replaced for $300 and he had 150 feet of line to get replaced.
Ill get a few more quotes.
Mr Smiley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2012, 07:09 AM   #8
A "Handy Husband"
 
rjniles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: South Carolina Low Country
Posts: 3,941
Default

Pex Plumbing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Smiley View Post
I would like to do the incoming line first. But im not sure if the quotes i have received are too high or not? I know my brother in law got his incoming line replaced for $300 and he had 150 feet of line to get replaced.
Ill get a few more quotes.
Not a believable number, you can't buy the material for that (unless it was done in 1948).

You need to get more quotes.
__________________
Location:
Coastal South Carolina
rjniles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 12:01 AM   #9
Member
 
Homerepairguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 748
Default

Pex Plumbing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Smiley View Post
I want to do it all. I can get to 90% of all the first floor plumbing, so a trunk line should be fairly easy. So i would do a 3/4" trunk and have 1/2" lins running off to, the toilet, bathroom sink, kitchen sink, ice maker and dishwasher. Would i want to supply the dishwasher with 1/2" or 3/4"? We will also be replacing up to 3 water spigits.
I personally like the wirsbo/Uponor PEX system so that's what I'll be discussing. If you do a trunk & branch system, the number of outlets at the remote location will depend on whether you have back-to-back bathrooms or not. Does someone like to take baths and want the tub to fill quicker? In that case maybe you want to install a high flow tub faucet that wants a 3/4" input.

For a single bathroom, you could get an Uponor 2-outlet EP flow-through multi-port tee, for the cold line that looks like this:


The 3/4" cold trunk line would go in one end and exit as 3/4" to the tub/shower. This would allow you to install a high flow tub faucet or a normal flow tub faucet. One 1/2" cold output would go to the vanity and the other 1/2" cold output would go to the toilet.

Or you could select a terminated EP multi-port tee that looks like this:

and output 1/2" lines to the vanity, toilet and tub.

Select the appropriate EP flow-through or terminated multi-port tee for your particular situation from this selection at pexsupply:
http://www.pexsupply.com/EP-Multi-Port-Tees-485000

HRG

Homerepairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Homerepairguy For This Useful Post:
ben's plumbing (05-02-2012)
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the standard method of water pressure test for shower plumbing please? Andy21 Plumbing 10 10-28-2011 04:06 AM
Bath remodel in 1947 house -- questions about plaster and plumbing Alix Remodeling 7 06-06-2011 09:12 PM
ALOT Of Help Needed for Plumbing ~FYE~ Plumbing 4 09-22-2009 12:28 AM
Sewer smell after hooking into plumbing vent daveyd Plumbing 10 08-10-2009 06:25 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.