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Old 06-26-2012, 07:37 PM   #1
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Hello,
I am trying to repair a cracked pipe in a very old building. The drainage is made of old cast iron pipe. The problematic area is as follows, a "Y" connection, to a 6" straight pipe, threaded into a threaded collar. The 6" pipe is cracked and threaded on both ends. The threaded joints seem rusty. The people at the hardware stores seem to be unfamilar with cast iron pipes. It seems like the best advice I got so far was;
Cut the 6" pipe down the middle, unthread both ends, thread in ABS adapters, and glue in about 6" of straight pipe.
Questions:
Is this the way to go?
If so, won't unscrewing the pipe be murder, is there a trick of the trade, like torching it.
Thanks for the help.

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Old 06-26-2012, 08:34 PM   #2
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Post a picture, without it, everyone's going to be guessing.

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Old 06-26-2012, 08:50 PM   #3
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by turkboy View Post
I am trying to repair a cracked pipe in a very old building.
The drainage is made of old cast iron pipe.
You keep saying cast...

Quote:
The problematic area is as follows, a "Y" connection, to a 6" straight pipe, threaded into a threaded collar. The 6" pipe is cracked and threaded on both ends. The threaded joints seem rusty.

The people at the hardware stores seem to be unfamilar with cast iron pipes.
Well, maybe they're just unfamiliar with threaded cast iron pipe?
I have to admit that I am as well.

Quote:
It seems like the best advice I got so far was;
Cut the 6" pipe... adapt... and glue in (new) pipe.
Is this the way to go?
Close to.

Post a couple of clear pictures.
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:09 PM   #4
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Cast iron is never threaded---galvanized steel is.

Chances of unscrewing that rotted pipe are slim--

Yes--torching the pipe and cooling it will help

Pictures please---
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:42 PM   #5
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Sorry about the pic, here it is ...
You may be right, it may be galvanised, hard for me to tell.
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:07 PM   #6
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


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Originally Posted by turkboy View Post
Sorry about the pic, here it is ...
You might be able to set a patch fitting over the split.
If that won't do it... I sure don't envy you this job.

Look for something like this:
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Last edited by TarheelTerp; 06-26-2012 at 10:14 PM.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:56 AM   #7
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by turkboy View Post
Sorry about the pic, here it is ...
You may be right, it may be galvanised, hard for me to tell.



That's galvinized pipe,isn't there a union anywhere close?
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:35 AM   #8
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


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That's galvinized pipe,isn't there a union anywhere close?
Not too many unions in DWV piping.
Best to take out as much pipe as possible and replace with plastic. That pic only shows one bad spot. Bet there's more coming...
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:09 PM   #9
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Hi Guys,

Thanks for all the great advice, I'm glad I was able to provide so much entertainment for you

Sorry I wandered onto this forum, I'm actually a HVAC guy, and missed the part where I ended up on the pro-plumber forum. I was seeking advice but seem to have ended up in the wrong forum, but at least you guys got some laughs, all is well that ends well. So now I know it galv steel, and lead pipes don't have threads, I got something out of this!

If you do have so good advice thanks, else I'll let you know how the spray foam ends up

Take care boys, sorry again.
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Old 06-28-2012, 12:19 AM   #10
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


I didnt notice anybody laughing at you,and yes thats galvanized pipe.
Where does the pipe go once it leaves the next fitting?
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Old 06-28-2012, 05:55 AM   #11
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My last reply was intended for another forum, I wandered onto a forum for pro's and they had fun with the responses.

The advice I got here was actually great. I just need to find the patch fitting, home depot does not have it, and plumbing stores are harder to find, so I have an exercise with the yellow pages.

The pipe leads into a threaded sleeve and then another straight run of quite a few inches. Why do you ask, I can maybe provide better info if I know what you are looking for.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:02 AM   #12
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


Take a picture from farther back--It might be easier to cut out the Y and the Iron fitting ahead of the bad section--then use rubber Fernco fitting---and convert the whole assembly to PVC.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:09 AM   #13
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If it goes up into a wall it might be a good idea to open it up and check condition of rest of pipe,might also be easier to go ahead and tie into a solid piece higher up using a no-hub coupling instead of trying to piece together between offsets going into the wall.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:22 AM   #14
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Old School Cast Iron Pipe Repair


I Guarantee you if the pipe is damaged that much in that spot the whole line is damaged, I'd just cut it all out and install PVC as previously mentioned by others. In fact I think it would be easier to replace the line than repair it and Peace of Mind.

You know it's just like light bulbs when one burns out replace all of them, when you replace a tire on the car you replace both sides never just one.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:50 AM   #15
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I Guarantee you if the pipe is damaged that much in that spot the whole line is damaged, I'd just cut it all out and install PVC as previously mentioned by others.
There is ZERO doubt that this will need to be done... at some point.
Don't patch fix this and then bury it behind a finished wall or ceiling.

If the pipe can remain exposed as it is now then my suggestion remains that if the ONE patch can solve the immediate problem that should buy you a few years before you need to do more. But it's still a delay tactic.

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