Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-12-2008, 12:58 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


Getting ready to start a revalve, my main sticks out of the ground only a few inch's. If I start there it's galvanised, so do I put in a galvanised ball valve and then into the preasure regulator and after that switch to copper via dialectric union? Do I replace my preasure valve with a new copper one (is there such a thing)? where do I make the switch to copper?

Thanks Scott

fast380 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 05:19 AM   #2
Long-Time DIYer
 
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
Posts: 1,460
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


I'm not a pro plumber, just a long-time DIYer.
Sounds like you're planning on replacing your lines with all copper from your main shut-off valve.
If it were me, I would go ahead and replace that old obsolete galvanized back from the meter on (1" "K" copper or white plastic PVC). Galvanized is notorious for scaling up inside, restricting water flow, until it eventually plugs up all together.
I would use a 1" brass quarter-turn shut-off valve for the main, and then copper from there, if that's your choice. If you replace all of the galvanized, you won't have to deal with any di-electric fittings, either.
Have you considered PEX? Easier and much less expensive than copper. That's what most of the pro plumbers are using here now, instead of copper (unless copper is specified by owner).
Good luck!
Mike

Mike Swearingen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 11:11 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 650
Rewards Points: 500
Send a message via AIM to Marlin
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen View Post
I'm not a pro plumber, just a long-time DIYer.
Sounds like you're planning on replacing your lines with all copper from your main shut-off valve.
If it were me, I would go ahead and replace that old obsolete galvanized back from the meter on (1" "K" copper or white plastic PVC). Galvanized is notorious for scaling up inside, restricting water flow, until it eventually plugs up all together.
I would use a 1" brass quarter-turn shut-off valve for the main, and then copper from there, if that's your choice. If you replace all of the galvanized, you won't have to deal with any di-electric fittings, either.
Have you considered PEX? Easier and much less expensive than copper. That's what most of the pro plumbers are using here now, instead of copper (unless copper is specified by owner).
Good luck!
Mike
Mike Swearingen has the right idea. Ideally you want all the galvanized lines including those underground gone. Eventually you will be forced to replace them, it might be a month from now, it might be twenty years from now.
Is your meter inside or outside?
If it's inside I would start replacing from the meter on, leave anything before it for when you do the underground.
If it's outside then shut off the water in the pit and right where it comes into the house their should be a fitting, be it an elbow or valve. You're going to want to go back at least to the first valve and unthread it. You may run into problems unthreading it, it may require heat, or be impossible to unthread. If that happens you may be beyond the point of just putting it back together. In that case you'll need to do the underground, or possibly cut it and use a compression fitting. Then use brass elbows, and nipples to get a brass IPS ball valve where it has to be right up against the wall so you're not sticking out into the room with it. From there you can go to copper with a male adapter. Their is no need for a dielectric union going from galvanized to brass.

The other benifit of doing it in IPS up to the valve is you don't need to worry about water making it difficult to solder.


As far as PEX goes most plumbers if asked for a recommendation on pipeing materials would say copper without missing a beat. The sole advantage of PEX is price. That is why most new homes are plumbed with it, the contractor is going for the cheapest solution. Most of the builders (around here at least) specify copper when doing high end construction. The guys who bang out fifty house subdivisions, take their money, and move on go for pex because it's fast and cheap.

Last edited by Marlin; 01-12-2008 at 11:23 AM.
Marlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 07:14 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 61
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


With respect Marlin, I disagree that pex is used only because it is less expensive. True, cost is a major consideration especially with the price of copper and labor, but as people become aware of all the other benefits a pex system offers we are seeing more custom houses and remodels specify it. Thanks.
scrapiron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 07:30 PM   #5
Long-Time DIYer
 
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
Posts: 1,460
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


I highly respect Marlin's opinions and DIY recommendations from observing all of his previous posts.
I have to admit that I've never personally never used PEX, but all of my pro plumber friends here do. They swear by it vs copper now. It's long been used in Europe.
I don't have any in my 1977 home, but if I built another, I would go with PEX all the way, based on all that I've read and seen these days.
Mike
Mike Swearingen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 10:36 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 650
Rewards Points: 500
Send a message via AIM to Marlin
Default

Old preasure valve, new copper pipe.


Quote:
Originally Posted by scrapiron View Post
With respect Marlin, I disagree that pex is used only because it is less expensive. True, cost is a major consideration especially with the price of copper and labor, but as people become aware of all the other benefits a pex system offers we are seeing more custom houses and remodels specify it. Thanks.
What benefit does pex offer over copper other than price? You can get a flexible pipe into some spaces you can't get hard pipe which can be handy on re-models. You do need to strap the heck out of it to keep it from becoming a snake though. The manifold system seems like it would be handy but that's a ton of pipe to run in larger houses. I've never run one and have never seen one installed. The same thing can really be accomplished with copper pipe and valves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen View Post
They swear by it vs copper now. It's long been used in Europe.
I don't have any in my 1977 home, but if I built another, I would go with PEX all the way, based on all that I've read and seen these days.
Mike
I've seen the Europe thing advertised frequently and I really want to know what system they used that is proven. If we know one system works why doesn't that manufacturer step forward and use that in his advertising. That would very quickly put them on top of all the other PEX manufacturers.


The PEX vs. copper issue can be argued all day long. I don't have a problem installing PEX but if cost isn't an issue I'd personally go with copper.


Last edited by Marlin; 01-12-2008 at 10:43 PM.
Marlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can I Extend the 3/4" Copper Pipe? froddan Plumbing 2 07-23-2007 04:03 PM
Cap Off Copper Pipe Jareb Plumbing 3 06-22-2007 09:43 AM
Does copper pipe wear out? ouchmythumb Plumbing 2 05-13-2007 12:05 AM
Copper pipe for conduit? ricemg Electrical 4 01-23-2007 05:04 PM
Type L Or M Copper Pipe bobo Plumbing 1 11-20-2005 07:53 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.