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Old 07-07-2012, 05:42 PM   #1
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No water - any idea why?


I have am Amtrol Well-X-Trol that worked fine until the other day. I went to reset it (they are confusing how to reset, you basically have 2 things that you push up on, but can't let flip over)

Checked line, it was getting power.

Now, I might have hurt something with the next step I did. I wanted to see if it was the pump or the tank that was bad, so I cut the line that ran out to the tank and connected it to 110. Probably is, some wiring caps melted, so now I'm not sure if the pump was ever supposed to run on 110 to start with.

Any idea how to fix / diagnose this? I think the actual pump is at the bottom of the 100 foot long well shaft - do you just pull it out of there by it's wires?

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Old 07-07-2012, 06:30 PM   #2
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No water - any idea why?


Call an expert. Based on what you did, chances are you fried the motor and no telling what else. I really doubt you have the eletrical knowlege to follow any suggestions we might have.

Not ragging on you...we all have different skill sets.....my wife is a great cook and knows how to use my all of my power tools....but anything more than changing a light bulb is beyond her....just like I could not match my clothes if my life depended on it....hence the reason she does all of my clothes buying....

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Old 07-07-2012, 06:48 PM   #3
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No water - any idea why?


In this case I have to agree with DDawg. Based on your post, you lack the skill set to wire a pump, since you probably had a 220 volt pump (most deep well pumps are), yet you seem to have hooked it up to 110. Actually pulling the pump is more difficult than it would seem, and incorrect technique can lead to all sorts of serious problems, like a pump jammed in the well, and other unpleasant events. Time for a pump pro to take over.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:01 PM   #4
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No water - any idea why?


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
In this case I have to agree with DDawg. Based on your post, you lack the skill set to wire a pump, since you probably had a 220 volt pump (most deep well pumps are), yet you seem to have hooked it up to 110. Actually pulling the pump is more difficult than it would seem, and incorrect technique can lead to all sorts of serious problems, like a pump jammed in the well, and other unpleasant events. Time for a pump pro to take over.
****. I never liked how the controls on them Well-X-Trolls were setup.

That said, when I cut into the existing line, I had black, white and ground -- shouldn't that mean 120? It melted, so I'm sure something was screwed up, just not sure what.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:12 PM   #5
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No water - any idea why?


I have a Goulds deep well pump with a Welltrol expansion tank. My pump is 220 volt only, and the controller only has three wires, two hots and a ground. No need for a neutral on a 220 volt pump. Only way to tell for sure what is the voltage is by using a voltmeter, unless you happen to have the pump spec, but even then it is good practice to check the voltage first with a voltmeter.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:16 PM   #6
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No water - any idea why?


Is the welltrol 220 then also?
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Old 07-08-2012, 01:14 PM   #7
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No water - any idea why?


No one has any ideas who to diagnose if it's the tank or the pump?
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Old 07-08-2012, 01:29 PM   #8
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No water - any idea why?


Are you asking if the tank is water logged?
Are you asking if the Pressure switch is bad?

There are only a few well pumps that are 110volt...... Most if not all are at the 240volt
There is a well control box that has the phas and the hp of the pump along with the max amp draw.
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Old 07-08-2012, 03:03 PM   #9
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I think you are confusing us with your terminology. So let's define a few terms so we can all talk the same language. The pump is the electrical device that sits at the bottom of the well, and supplies pressurized water. Most submersible pumps are designed to operate at 240 volts.

You probably have a pressure switch, which is an electrical device designed to turn the pump on at a specific pressure (often 40 psi) and turn the pump off when the pressure reaches a designated maximum, often 60 or 70 psi. The pressure switch operates at the same voltage as the pump, typically 240 volts.

You probably have a pressure tank, which is usually a steel cylinder, often blue, that contains a bladder, and is connected to the supply line using a well tee. The pressure tank is not electric.

Most well systems include an on-off switch, which must be rated for the voltage of the pump, typically 240 volts.

There are various other features you may have, too numerous to list in full, but your system may include filters, a water softener, a more sophisticated pump controller, various gages, possibly a backflow preventer, and various pieces of plumbing including shut off valves, and a drain. These are typically not electric, and have nothing to do with your particular problem.

Now that you know the terminology, you may want to recount exactly what happened, and perhaps we can help out. But I really think you need a pump specialist based on what you have said so far.
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Old 07-08-2012, 03:04 PM   #10
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No water - any idea why?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Akpsdvan View Post
Are you asking if the tank is water logged?
Are you asking if the Pressure switch is bad?

There are only a few well pumps that are 110volt...... Most if not all are at the 240volt
There is a well control box that has the phas and the hp of the pump along with the max amp draw.
As dumb as this sounds, I think my initial problem might just be that I was out of water.

So, I guess I'm going to wait for it to rain, which it doesn't look like it's going to do for a while.
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Old 07-08-2012, 10:36 PM   #11
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No water - any idea why?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
I think you are confusing us with your terminology. So let's define a few terms so we can all talk the same language. The pump is the electrical device that sits at the bottom of the well, and supplies pressurized water. Most submersible pumps are designed to operate at 240 volts.

You probably have a pressure switch, which is an electrical device designed to turn the pump on at a specific pressure (often 40 psi) and turn the pump off when the pressure reaches a designated maximum, often 60 or 70 psi. The pressure switch operates at the same voltage as the pump, typically 240 volts.

You probably have a pressure tank, which is usually a steel cylinder, often blue, that contains a bladder, and is connected to the supply line using a well tee. The pressure tank is not electric.

Most well systems include an on-off switch, which must be rated for the voltage of the pump, typically 240 volts.

There are various other features you may have, too numerous to list in full, but your system may include filters, a water softener, a more sophisticated pump controller, various gages, possibly a backflow preventer, and various pieces of plumbing including shut off valves, and a drain. These are typically not electric, and have nothing to do with your particular problem.

Now that you know the terminology, you may want to recount exactly what happened, and perhaps we can help out. But I really think you need a pump specialist based on what you have said so far.
I'm an idiot, I fixed.

It takes 220, that's all I had to ****ing do. But I looked and looked and swore it was 110 in the knob and tube -- guess I was wrong. SO ****ING NICE TO HAVE WATER! Plus, the poorly ran 20 amp 220 junctions should help keep down the rats
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Old 07-08-2012, 10:39 PM   #12
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No water - any idea why?


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I'm an idiot, I fixed.

It takes 220, that's all I had to ****ing do. But I looked and looked and swore it was 110 in the knob and tube -- guess I was wrong. SO ****ING NICE TO HAVE WATER! Plus, the poorly ran 20 amp 220 junctions should help keep down the rats
Best part - hot water heater kicks on, and I smell fire, and spend 5 minutes rechecking all the writing :P

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