Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-24-2010, 04:00 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

new water supply


I am in South Carolina, presently on well water. They have just installed new water main at street and I am waiting for installation of meter before I plumb new supply to house. I have 580' from meter to where I will tie into existing 1" pvc near well house. One person at water co. told me I should use 1/1/2" pvc another said 2" to be for sure. I'm a little confused. The water main is 6", they tapped a 1" line from there to the meter about 12' away and have a 3/4" shut off valve I tie into. Does this sound right? And any suggestions. Thanks
Steve

vaconcrete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 09:37 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 133
Rewards Points: 75
Default

new water supply


580' is a long way, the people telling you to go larger piping are trying to keep your friction loss down on that long of a run. For example, if your flowing 10 gpm through a 1" line that goes 580 feet, your friction loss will be close to 17 psi, and that doesn't include elevation loss or fitting loss. But if you flow 10 gpm through a 1-1/2" line, the friction loss drops to around 2 psi. If you up it to a 2" line, it drops even further to 0.6 psi.

Meters are always installed one pipe size smaller than the line size for accurate readings. pressure loss through the 12 feet of 1" and the 3/4" meter will be low, around 1/2 psi drop. If you connect into the 3/4" pipe, then jump up to 1-1/2" for the 580 foot run, you won't have any more than say 5 psi loss from the street main to your house. If the house sits higher than the road, your going to have some pressure loss due to elevation on top of it. If you know what pressure the main is operating, how high above the street your house is, I can better estimate what pressure you'll see where the line comes in your house and give you better advice on the line size. It could be 1-1/2", 2", or even 1-1/4" might work if the pressure in the street is high.

The Engineer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 10:17 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

new water supply


Thanks, I haven't shot elevations but I think I'll go with the 2" since cost ins't that much of a factor. And I'm asssuming since I'm going with that size, sch 40 pvc in 20' lengths is my only real option. A local plumbing house said they could get roll 2" but I would never be able to install it without a machine because of it's stiffness. So last question is this the right pipe?
Thanks
vaconcrete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 10:57 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 133
Rewards Points: 75
Default

new water supply


You want to make sure you use the right type of Sch. 40 PVC. Piping meant for pressure applications should be stamped ASTM D1785. You don't want to use Sch. 40 drainage piping for water supply. The piping should also be stamped with a pressure rating and also have a laboratory seal or mark indicating that it is suitable for potable water. You should also pressure test the 580' run before making the final connection to your house to make sure there are no leaks.
The Engineer is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to The Engineer For This Useful Post:
vaconcrete (05-25-2010)
Old 05-25-2010, 01:46 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: central virginia mountains
Posts: 1,857
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

new water supply


srry misspoke
__________________
The older I get the better I was
tpolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to properly drain and flush a hot water heater? speedster1 Plumbing 9 04-17-2012 10:55 PM
low domestic hot water flow with tankless coil mike42 HVAC 28 11-24-2011 09:35 AM
water supply layout wglord Plumbing 1 07-13-2009 01:07 PM
low hot water pressure angus242 Plumbing 10 01-08-2009 12:41 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.