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Old 01-20-2011, 10:41 AM   #1
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


So I got a good enamel double basin sink, cut plumbing and drainage into the wall, built a counter and rebuilt the faucet.

I bought new drain spuds (strainer bodies?) from HD and picked up some plumbers putty. According the the instructions on the package and everything I've read online, I did everything "right", however no matter how much I tighten things one drain still leaks. The other will start if I mess with the one that is leaking.

From the top:
Spud lip
Plumbers Putty (pencil sized ring on spud lip)
Sink basin
Rubber gasket
White paper washer (?)
Spud Nut
*Tighten with wrench


I've tightened everything to the point that the rubber gaskets are pushing out underneath, and I'm still getting putty squeeze out and both spuds still spin in the basin. Most importantly they are leaking right out of the rubber gasket (which is pushed out somewhat on both, moreso on the one that is tighter and starts leaking sometimes.

So- pencil sized is No.2 pencil, I figured the white paper washer was so the spud nut wouldn't catch on the rubber gasket (package said nothing) and the box specifically says to tighten with a wrench.

So, should I just pull and clean everything and put it back with gobs of plumbers putty (sausage sized rings) or is there something else I'm doing wrong?

How tight is "tighten with a wrench"?

Should the drains be able to be rotated with force in the basin, or should they be locked in place once tight?

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Last edited by jage; 01-20-2011 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 01-20-2011, 11:01 AM   #2
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


Need a picture to help.

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Old 01-20-2011, 11:17 AM   #3
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


You should not be able to spin the strainers with your hand once it is tight.
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Old 01-20-2011, 11:18 AM   #4
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


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Old 01-20-2011, 11:56 AM   #5
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


I would loosen mounting nut all the way (let it hang temporarily) and reseat rubber and fiber gasket. I (just my habits) would use teflon tape on strainer body threads. Raise up mounting nut, tighten up by hand and focus on keeping level with bottom of sink. Should be relatively tight without squeezing rubber gasket to tightly. The fiber gasket is supposed to press evenly on rubber gasket. Tighten with wrench tool but not a lot.

Plan B: If still spins, use both fiber gaskets on one side and see if tightens. If yes, go get 2 more fiber gaskets at plumbing supplier.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:19 AM   #6
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


This isn't a bathroom sink with an overflow drain with a hole in the threaded part for admitting water through the side, so the threaded part shouldn't be getting wet to begin with, so PTFE tape isn't necessary. For a bathroom sink, it is, to seal water from the sidewall from coming down the thread.

The washers are there to relieve from mechanical stress and prevent loosening of connection through thermal expansion/contraction cycle of metal parts. if you have to use thread seal, then you don't have a good seal on the flange.

It's the top flange to sink surface that forms the seal.
Plumbers' putty seal can break easily if you let the strainer spin even a little bit during installation, so I would suggest using clear 100% silicone sealant where the inside surface of sink and bottom of strainer meets. Using too much won't hurt. Tape off the inside of sink with masking tape, so you minimize spreading around the mess when cleaning up. These things are harder to install than a garbage disposal, because the mounting is accomplished by a ring nut rather than anchor bolts, so its very easy to spin and compromise the plumbers putty seal.


If the mounting nut is metal, go ahead and use a few drops of oil to make it easier to tighten. If it's plastic, it isn't necessary.
You don't need to add washers unless you're bottoming out the thread.

Last edited by HVAC_NW; 01-21-2011 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:35 AM   #7
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New Drains Old Sink, Both Leak


Quote:
Originally Posted by HVAC_NW View Post
It's the top flange to sink surface that forms the seal.
Plumbers' putty seal can break easily if you let the strainer spin even a little bit during installation, so I would suggest using clear 100% silicone sealant where the inside surface of sink and bottom of strainer meets. Using too much won't hurt. Tape off the inside of sink with masking tape, so you minimize spreading around the mess when cleaning up. These things are harder to install than a garbage disposal, because the mounting is accomplished by a ring nut rather than anchor bolts, so its very easy to spin and compromise the plumbers putty seal.


If the mounting nut is metal, go ahead and use a few drops of oil to make it easier to tighten. If it's plastic, it isn't necessary.
You don't need to add washers unless you're bottoming out the thread.

I agree here. I dont Like Silicone if i am going to ever have to remove it but, does do a great Job. I use a "Sausage" size ring but you will find with older sinks you need a second person to help hold it still unless you can improvise. If it spins... You pretty much need to start over. Now if you are able to hold the bottom of the strainer and keep it from spinning you maybe able to do it from there. They make tools to hold the cross hairs But, as said with old sinks silicone may still be your best option.

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