DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Need help re-routing kitchen sink vent (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/need-help-re-routing-kitchen-sink-vent-55112/)

Fingers 10-13-2009 07:54 PM

Need help re-routing kitchen sink vent
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello,

I'm about to embark on a kitchen reno where I will replace all the kitchen cabinetry, update electrical to latest code, and tie into existing plumbing. I (admittedly) have little experience in plumbing, but this isn't a very big job.

The new sink is going in the same exact location. My problem is twofold:
-currently, the vent runs to the left across three cabinets, where it connects in the wall to the stack. This uses up valuable storage space
-the wall directly behind the sink is an outside wall.

I want to re-route the vent. My questions are:
-The way the sink is vented now -- is this the correct way to do it? Do you see any problems with the existing work?
-Can I run the vent on the outside wall without worry of frost closing? This will be done in order to connect the vent to the vertical stack in an adjacent interior partition wall.
-Any special considerations? I understand that the vent has to be 1/4" rise for every 12" run. Is it acceptable to run this pipe (2.25"???) through a structural (exterior) wall?
-As an alternative, could I not just do the "kitchen island sink loop" vent? That way the vent will go down and connect to the stack via the basement?
-Should I just run it, in a cleaner manner, across the three new cabinets instead, and save myself the headache?


Thanks!!!

oh'mike 10-13-2009 08:02 PM

Vent can be put into outside walls.Kind of a knuckle buster of a job though.

Do you have a soffit? Drill past the window-then up an open stud bay to the soffit?

Fingers 10-13-2009 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 340375)
Vent can be put into outside walls.Kind of a knuckle buster of a job though.

Do you have a soffit? Drill past the window-then up an open stud bay to the soffit?

Yeah I suppose I could do that, but I live in Canada -- we require 3" for vent stack exits to exterior in order to prevent frost closure. And I REALLY dont want to make a new stack.

JDC 10-13-2009 11:16 PM

That vent is incorrect anyway. It should rise to at least 6" above the flood level rim of your sink before it makes a horizontal offset.

Fingers 10-20-2009 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 340482)
That vent is incorrect anyway. It should rise to at least 6" above the flood level rim of your sink before it makes a horizontal offset.

Are you sure that applies in this situation? I dont see how any sink could accomodate a 6" vent riser before horizontal.

Plumber101 10-20-2009 09:49 PM

It would have to go in the wall

Also get rid of that trap set up it looks to me like a "S" trap

Fingers 10-21-2009 05:44 AM

another board suggested I replace the wye with a sanitary tee. so the p-trap would come on on the horizontal of the tee, and the vent would feed up. I hope this well meet code requirements.

I will draw up a new diagram for a plumbing plan and have you guys review. Thanks!

747 10-21-2009 06:20 AM

Wow i have never seen anything like that.:laughing:

JDC 10-21-2009 09:08 PM

Yes I am absolutely sure it applies in your situation. The drain should come up inside the wall, a tee installed going into the cabinet under the sink, a vent rising out of the top of the tee then proceeding where need be to get it either out the roof or tied into a vent stack or stack vent. A horizontal offset can be installed after the vent rises at least 6" above the flood level rim of the receiving receptacle...in your case, the sink.

Fingers 10-21-2009 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 343887)
Yes I am absolutely sure it applies in your situation. The drain should come up inside the wall, a tee installed going into the cabinet under the sink, a vent rising out of the top of the tee then proceeding where need be to get it either out the roof or tied into a vent stack or stack vent. A horizontal offset can be installed after the vent rises at least 6" above the flood level rim of the receiving receptacle...in your case, the sink.

Gotcha, thank you. So there's no choice but to run the vent inside the wall.

I don't think I'll be able to put the drain inside the wall as it is an outside wall and the block/mortar foundation is in the way. Are there any alternatives?

The vent -- i could probably accomodate running inside the wall, but i'm worried about the drain according to what you're saying.

JDC 10-22-2009 10:47 PM

You can come up through the floor into the cabinet, throw off your tee for the sink then 45 out of the top of the tee to get into the wall. Anything greater than a 45 degree angle is considered a horizontal offset. I'd try to get the drain as close as possible to the back wall so you can make the 45 degree offset with a little more ease.

Crus11 10-23-2009 03:17 PM

Not sure this is code complient but what about an AVV vent or power vent that can be put under the sink?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:13 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved