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Old 01-16-2012, 08:23 AM   #16
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natural gas line problem


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Originally Posted by COLDIRON
Working on gas, anyone ever-heard of bronze adjustables, and open end wrench's. That's what real gas workers use to prevent sparks while working.
As a "real gas worker", I do not use bronze adjustables because we don't work in the gas envelope anymore, unless absolutely necessary. The cowboy days are over. Our main concern is grounding our lines to prevent sparking.

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Old 01-16-2012, 12:29 PM   #17
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natural gas line problem


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As a "real gas worker", I do not use bronze adjustables because we don't work in the gas envelope anymore, unless absolutely necessary. The cowboy days are over. Our main concern is grounding our lines to prevent sparking.
Are They ? Giddy up partner lots of Cowboys on the net.
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:15 PM   #18
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natural gas line problem


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One, I'd turn the spring on the inside regulator (aka reg) inwards (clockwise, not CCW as another poster suggested- that will only cause more trouble). This will allow that reg to act as a monitor, which is basically a down stream reg from the main reg which remains open until the main (outside)reg fails and takes over to prevent a massive spike in pressure which will destroy your appliance regs. If it's set too close to the main reg, it can cause pressure problems. It should be set much higher.
Agreed in principal, but only if the spring weight and orfice are sufficient size for the flow required. Perhaps the Gas company looked at this reg and determined that was the problem, too small on orfice.

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Old 01-16-2012, 04:52 PM   #19
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natural gas line problem


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Agreed in principal, but only if the spring weight and orfice are sufficient size for the flow required. Perhaps the Gas company looked at this reg and determined that was the problem, too small on orfice.

Mark
Definitely. The spring would have to be able to elevate the pressure well above the main reg's set point. The orifice is what would concern me the most. Main/monitor set-ups are generally placed very close together. Having such a small restriction far down stream (it's probably only a 1/8 orifice) could potentially cause a problem. Best to just remove the damn thing.

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