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adpanko 06-18-2009 12:39 PM

Natural Gas Grill Code Requirements
 
I know each state/town may have its own unique set of codes with regards to nat gas piping and specifically how it pertains to outdoor gas grills. But I'm replacing the existing gas grill at my house, and need to swap out the old quick-connect with the new one. I noticed the hard piping that leads up to the point of connection is extremely rusted, which leads me to believe it is black iron (appears to be 3/8"). And there is no shutoff valve outside; only where the line for the grill branches off from the main line in our basement. So I'm thinking of redoing all of the piping outside the house. Figuring I need to add a shutoff and do it all in galvanized NPT pipe, not black.

Anyone know what the specific requirements are with regards to pipe type, size, clearance, shutoff specifications, etc? Also, the branch of pipe running off the main gas line is flexible copper, and the copper goes through the foundation and then links up with the hard pipe. I'm assuming flexible copper is safe or allowed to be exposed outside, unprotected from the elements and/or physical damage. And I didn't look close to see how the copper connects with the hard pipe, but presumably it needs to be a dielectric union.

Any help, insight is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Andy

kenmac 06-18-2009 12:49 PM

coated black iron pipe for under ground use. I would say what you are calling 3/8 is probably 1/2.. Code only states a shut off for each appliance... You can install as many as you want... Code is only min. requirments..


Size depends on BTU & how long of a run of pipe is to the appliance

adpanko 06-18-2009 01:11 PM

Thanks for the quick reply. I'm fairly certain it is only 3/8" pipe on the outside. I worked in a plumbing supply house for a few summers while in college and know plumbing parts fairly well. There is/was 3/8" pipe run elsewhere in the house. The line feeding the dryer is only 3/8"; I know for certain because I had to get a 3/8"-to-1/2" coupling to link up to the flexible dryer supply line when I replaced our dryer.

The run of flexible copper from the main only runs about 6-8' until it breaks through and goes out the foundation. I didn't measure, but the copper appears to be 1/2". Then from there, it is only a foot or two until it meets the quick connect for the grill (the grill has a 10' flexible hose).

The BTU of the grill is 41k, and a 12k side burner.

I was thinking of redoing all the outside pipe with 1/2" galvanized and putting in a quarter-turn ball cock, if needed. I figured the quick-connect would shut off the gas flow, but don't know if that was sufficient enough of an outside shut off. I also don't know what kind of clearances I need around the pipe/shut-off outside, if any.

Rehabber 06-18-2009 01:25 PM

The flexible pipe is only allowed between a shutoff valve and the appliance it is connected to.

majakdragon 06-18-2009 02:42 PM

Most areas do not allow galvanized pipe for gas lines. I have seen a few that do (Florida). The soft copper inside the house is very strange. In Ohio, we could use soft copper once the pipe exited the home, but not before. Personally, I would not trust a quick connect as any type of shut-off, since there is too much chance of failure. Just my two cents worth.

kenmac 06-18-2009 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majakdragon (Post 289449)
The soft copper inside the house is very strange.


There are alot ( did I say alot) of houses in my area where the entire house is piped with soft copper straight from the gas meter... This is allowed as we have many,many houses with a 2lb. meter / gas system inside the home. Soft copper is alot easier to run than cutting & threading pipe. A 2 lb gas system in the home allows you to run smaller pipe or copper & if you need to add a line . you have enough gas pressure to do so without running a 1-1 1/4 black iron pipe

majakdragon 06-18-2009 09:23 PM

Kenmac, Guess I never lived anywhere that the Code office based it's decisions on "being easier". Ohio claimed the copper could melt in a fire or easily be damaged. Galvanized was not used due to flaking and plugging the orfices of appliances, even with dirt legs added to the lines. This is why I try to tell people to check local codes. Big differences, as you have pointed out.

adpanko 06-19-2009 07:07 AM

I was finally able to talk with the town inspector this morning. Here's the verdict:

1/2" galvanized pipe is fine for the entire run, both inside and outside. Black pipe would be okay so long as it is properly painted on the outside portion. A shut-off is needed outside, as well as where the branch line stems off from the main. As for copper, he was shocked to hear that the majority of the run is soft copper; he claims he never saw that in town before and recommended it all be changed out to hard pipe. And there were no clearance issues with the placement of the piping inside or outside.

Thanks for everyones' help!

Thurman 06-19-2009 07:15 AM

Interesting, to say the least. In GA. galvanized is not allowed for NG or propane. Copper is not allowed to be used for "runs" within a dwelling, only from a shut-off to the appliance. NG fired gas grills on deck attached to homes must have a shut-off at/near the appliance even with a quick disconnect. Different jurisdictions, different rules. Thanks, David

kenmac 06-20-2009 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majakdragon (Post 289652)
Kenmac, Guess I never lived anywhere that the Code office based it's decisions on "being easier". Ohio claimed the copper could melt in a fire or easily be damaged. Galvanized was not used due to flaking and plugging the orfices of appliances, even with dirt legs added to the lines. This is why I try to tell people to check local codes. Big differences, as you have pointed out.



All I know is , that most cities , counties, etc, Here have adopted the International Fuel Gas Code.. In this code it's legal to run copper inside home & businesses.. Some gas utilities here don't offer a 2 lb gas system..( special meters, regulators) They only offer 6'' gas system... Even with the 6'' systems you can still run copper. Of course, the copper would have to be larger size

dstern 05-08-2012 05:27 PM

Protect thru foundation
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by adpanko (Post 289788)

Black pipe would be okay so long as it is properly painted on the outside portion.

Concrete can corrode pipe so a suitable sleeve is required thru foundation. Plastic or "proper" paint should include foundation, not just outside.

plumberman134 05-08-2012 05:36 PM

It's leagal to run copper here also.Must be a flare or compression connection though so it doesn't come apart during a fire.

hvac benny 05-09-2012 01:19 AM

You're replying to a three year old thread. Hopefully the OP has already got the job done.

dstern 05-16-2012 01:03 PM

Chat AND reference
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hvac benny (Post 917649)
You're replying to a three year old thread. Hopefully the OP has already got the job done.

Forums like this used as reference. So while code/regulations are subject to change knowledgeable advice can have a "shelf-life" long well beyond the initial post.


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