DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Moving sink Drain (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/moving-sink-drain-56522/)

knighton 11-03-2009 04:17 PM

Moving sink Drain
 
2 Attachment(s)
I'm in the process of remodeling my bathroom and have purchased a new vanity. The sink is going to be a little closer to the main drain line than before. The old drain is copper and is actually sloped in the wrong direction. My question is this:

Where is the correct location to cut the pipe off so that I can then replace it with PVC? I've attached a picture of what I'm talking about.

Thanks in advance

Bondo 11-03-2009 04:54 PM

Ayuh,... I would think it should be cut 2" or 3" to the right of "Or here"...
Then you can fenco the connection...
If you "cut here", remaking the connection will be problematic.... "or here" really isn't much better...

knighton 11-04-2009 07:51 AM

Thanks Bondo.

I should have mentioned that that would have been my first choice, but someone told me that you're supposed to replace the entire copper drain line. I don't know why, but that's what I was told.

RegeSullivan 11-04-2009 10:29 AM

Go with Bondo's suggestion or cut it where you want it to ext the wall and solder on a new fitting where you want it to come out of the wall. Or, save a few bucks and cut out what you don't need and solder it together with a coupling. Copper usually does not go bad.

Rege

Anti-wingnut 11-04-2009 10:55 AM

Is the copper-CI connection screwed, or is that a leaded connection? If the transition is screwed, then un-screw it, and put in a screwed plastic DWV fitting

knighton 11-06-2009 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RegeSullivan (Post 349081)
Go with Bondo's suggestion or cut it where you want it to ext the wall and solder on a new fitting where you want it to come out of the wall. Or, save a few bucks and cut out what you don't need and solder it together with a coupling. Copper usually does not go bad.

Rege

The pipe extending from the wall is lower than it is as the vent stack, which I would assume is not to code. Do you know of any reason why I should replace the entire copper pipe and not do as you suggested?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anti-wingnut (Post 349094)
Is the copper-CI connection screwed, or is that a leaded connection? If the transition is screwed, then un-screw it, and put in a screwed plastic DWV fitting

I can't tell whether or not it's screwed in or not. It looks like it leaded in. I'll check though, though if it's not screwed in and I don't want to tear it up trying to unscrew it.

Thanks for the responses. I'll reply with a picture once I actually do it.

RegeSullivan 11-06-2009 08:23 AM

Have you put a level on it to be sure it is sloped incorrectly? Sometimes items like the soft copper water lines just make it look like it is slopping in a different direction than it really is. 1/8" fall per 12" of run is all you need. With a distance as short as you have even level would work fine but is not ideal. If you are really concerned pull the old stuff out back to the hub (it should come out pretty easily) and replace it with PVC using a fernco in the hub. You will only have a few bucks in it and it will make you feel better.

All that said, if it is level or sloped correctly I'd keep the copper.

Rege

knighton 11-06-2009 08:29 AM

You say putting the Fernco inside the hub? I assume you mean on the outside?

Thanks again.

Saw where you're from. My wife is from Washington, PA and my brother-in-law lives in Robinson.

RegeSullivan 11-06-2009 09:03 AM

Check this website - http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/donuts-o-rings to see the proper seal. Your HD or Lowes should have them but any plumbing supply will stock them if you can't find them at the big box store.

It's doughnut like seal that goes in the hub and the PVC goes into the doughnut. They are hard to install in a tight spot but you seem to have the room to do it right. Everyone has their own way to install them. I prefer to insert the pvc into the seal, clean up the hub lube it up with dish soap and beat it in with a hammer. Work evenly around the fitting and get it seated all the way in and make sure the pvc stays seated.

Or, bevel the end of the pvc, place the seal in the hub lube with dish soap and push the pvc into the seal until your eyeballs pop out. Both ways will work so do which is easier for your situation.

Rege

Anti-wingnut 11-08-2009 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire Keila (Post 350321)
Your trap is probably backed up. You have to go under the sink and disconnect the drainpipe coming out of the bottom of the sink. You will see that that pipe connects to another. That is where the trap is. It traps hair & stuff. It will be slimy, smelly & gross. Once you remove that & rinse the pipes out thoroughly, reconnect them. Use a thin tape called 'pipe dope' around the male part that screws into the other. This prevents the connections from leaking. Your drain won't back up anymore & the smell will go away. When you do this have a bucket and a towel that you use as a rag. When you are finished & test it, turn water on slow and put bucket & towel underneath in case it leaks.

Did you look at the photographs? The cabinet, lav, and trap have all been removed. The OP is concerned about how to re-locate the wall fitting. We are here talking about apples, while you're in left field mumbling about oranges

knighton 11-09-2009 07:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anti-wingnut (Post 350583)
Did you look at the photographs? The cabinet, lav, and trap have all been removed. The OP is concerned about how to re-locate the wall fitting. We are here talking about apples, while you're in left field mumbling about oranges


There's absolutely no way she intended to reply to this thread. :laughing:

By the way, I cut the pipe about two inches away from the hub, fercoed it to 1 1/4" PVC and adjusted for the correct pitch. I had to notch the 2x4 a little more to accomodate for raising the pipe some.

The only problem I had was the 1 1/4" copper drain was much thinner than the PVC. The Fernco had to be tightened down a lot on the copper vs. PVC. I don't know if this will be a problem and will somehow compromise the integrity of the fernco.

I'll attach a picture a little later.

Anti-wingnut 11-09-2009 08:00 AM

Since your Fernco is probably IPS (Iron pipe size), and your copper is CWT (copper water tube) size, you might have been better to sweat a CWT x NPT fitting to the copper. Then thread and glue an adaptor to the plastic.

Claire is a spam bot

knighton 11-09-2009 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anti-wingnut (Post 350891)
Since your Fernco is probably IPS (Iron pipe size), and your copper is CWT (copper water tube) size, you might have been better to sweat a CWT x NPT fitting to the copper. Then thread and glue an adaptor to the plastic.

Claire is a spam bot

I still might need to do that. What would I need to ask for at the plumbing supply place?

Anti-wingnut 11-09-2009 08:31 AM

I am not sure what size pipe you have, but I will assume all are 1 1/4" nominal. So:
(1) female CWT sweat x MNPT - copper adaptor
(2) FNPT x F slip (glue) - plastic adaptor

JDC 11-09-2009 03:39 PM

1 Attachment(s)
You can get a shielded coupling such as Fernco's PROFLEX that will make the transition from CTS (Copper Tubing Size) to IPS (Iron Pipe Size). You'll need an 1-1/4" Copper X Plastic Proflex.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:48 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved