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-   -   Moving a Bathtub Drain Line (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/moving-bathtub-drain-line-96097/)

jhawkdc 02-21-2011 02:06 PM

Moving a Bathtub Drain Line
 
I am replacing a soaking tub with a clawfoot tub, and the drain line needs to be moved about 3'. I would have no trouble repiping to the existing trap, but how far away can the trap be from the actual tub drain? Moving the trap itself would be dificult. Assuming I slope the 1 1/2 line from the overflow to the trap (approximately 3' away), will this be acceptable? It is in a straight line and would require no bends.

oh'mike 02-21-2011 07:35 PM

You must move the trap---trap must be on the vertical pipe from the tub----What you are describing is a trap in the line--running trap---bad plan--Mike--

jhawkdc 02-21-2011 08:40 PM

Maybe I wasn't clear on my description, or maybe I'm just clueless. The trap would still be in a vertical pipe.....just one that is after a 3' sloped horizontal pipe run to it. Does this make a difference, or do I need to find a way to move the trap? If it matters....I'm in Colorado.

Alan 02-21-2011 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhawkdc (Post 595386)
Maybe I wasn't clear on my description, or maybe I'm just clueless. The trap would still be in a vertical pipe.....just one that is after a 3' sloped horizontal pipe run to it. Does this make a difference, or do I need to find a way to move the trap? If it matters....I'm in Colorado.

Terminology lesson :

Pipe from fixture outlet to trap inlet : Tailpiece

Pipe from Trap outlet to vent pipe : Trap arm

Pipe from vent to mainline : Drain

Your tailpiece must be vertical from the fixture outlet to the trap inlet. 45* is considered vertical still, but that doesn't give much room for movement, only a few inches perhaps.

Again, what you describe above is an "S" trap or a running trap and those are no-no's.

the_man 02-21-2011 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan (Post 595398)
Terminology lesson :

Pipe from fixture outlet to trap inlet : Tailpiece

Pipe from Trap outlet to vent pipe : Trap arm

Pipe from vent to mainline : Drain

Your tailpiece must be vertical from the fixture outlet to the trap inlet. 45* is considered vertical still, but that doesn't give much room for movement, only a few inches perhaps.

Again, what you describe above is an "S" trap or a running trap and those are no-no's.

just to add to this... my code limits tailpiece length to 24", like Alan said it must stay vertical all the way to the trap unless it's picking up a second drain

Alan 02-21-2011 11:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the_man (Post 595437)
just to add to this... my code limits tailpiece length to 24", like Alan said it must stay vertical all the way to the trap unless it's picking up a second drain

Same here, except we can only have one fixture on a trap arm, so i'm not sure how that applies to what you said. I forgot to mention your max distance for that 1-1/2" trap arm is 3'6". :yes:

the_man 02-22-2011 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan (Post 595478)
Same here, except we can only have one fixture on a trap arm, so i'm not sure how that applies to what you said. I forgot to mention your max distance for that 1-1/2" trap arm is 3'6". :yes:

basically i meant continuous waste for a kitchen sink or something like that :thumbsup:

Dougtheplumber 02-22-2011 08:40 PM

Perhaps the poster should check on local codes before beginning as I notice differences between the codes where I am and the codes posted.
The distance of a trap arm is 5' on 1-1/2" pipe in our code, as well as a running trap is acceptable here with the proper cleanout installed, which would probably not be possible in this case, but I do agree with Mike, most likely a bad plan that you would regret once complete.


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