Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-12-2007, 11:10 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 13
Share |
Default

Low Pressure


I've got old galvanized pipes throughout my house and have low water pressure, to the extent that you cannot use the kitchen sink if the shower or washing machine is running. I know that with this kind of pipe, corrosion builds up inside and they constrict and thus you get low water pressure. But Iím trying to figure out the best way to remedy this. It seems to me that a re-pipe is the way to go but is there any chance that maybe just the pipe from the shutoff needs to be replaced or something? The reason I ask is because each fixture has decent pressure on its own Ė itís just when you turn on two fixtures on at once that it drops.

I just donít want to go ahead with a whole re-pipe if something less might get the job done.

Thanks!

digthisbigcrux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 11:17 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2,083
Default

Low Pressure


Do you lose pressure only at the kitchen sink?
What size pipe do you have?

redline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 11:49 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 13
Default

Low Pressure


Quote:
Originally Posted by redline View Post
Do you lose pressure only at the kitchen sink?
What size pipe do you have?
We lose it everywhere when you turn another fixture on.

Pipe looks like it's about two inches.
digthisbigcrux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 02:12 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,670
Default

Low Pressure


Are you sure you are looking at the water supply piping? I have never seen anything larger than 1" piping in residential use. 2" or even 1-1/2" sounds like drainlines.
__________________
If you have never made a mistake, you haven't done much.
majakdragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 02:18 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 13
Default

Low Pressure


Quote:
Originally Posted by majakdragon View Post
Are you sure you are looking at the water supply piping? I have never seen anything larger than 1" piping in residential use. 2" or even 1-1/2" sounds like drainlines.
I am looking at the supply but it probably is 1 inch. Like most men, I tend to over-estimate size in inches.
digthisbigcrux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 02:21 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,670
Default

Low Pressure


Galvanized pipe served it's purpose for years but when it goes bad, it's over. If you remove a piece of that 1" pipe, it will probably have a hole smaller than a pencil in it. I think you are going to be repiping. Sorry.
__________________
If you have never made a mistake, you haven't done much.
majakdragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2007, 09:02 PM   #7
Journeyman Plumber
 
Ron The Plumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 1,994
Default

Low Pressure


Yep time to repipe, go with pex pipeing if allowed in the area.

__________________
Fix it right the first time, so you won't have to fix it a 2nd time.

2008 Oregon Specialty Plumbing Codes
Ron The Plumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pressure Tank Question? cruzplanner Plumbing 3 02-11-2009 11:11 AM
Water pressure? What water pressure? mnp13 Plumbing 9 05-03-2007 02:32 PM
High pressure bjr23 Plumbing 1 03-27-2007 07:24 PM
High pressure in water line atlfiveo Plumbing 5 02-06-2007 09:04 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.