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KE2KB 12-09-2008 03:54 PM

Low hot water pressure on kitchen faucet
 
Hi;
I have been investigating a problem with the kitchen sink faucet for a while. It's an old Moen with a cartridge type system, single handle.
I have removed the cartridge, and taken it apart to find no problems, except that it is leaking water through the top when the faucet is running.

When I stick my head under the sink, I can hear a hissing at the hot water shut-off, which indicates to me that it is not turned on all the way.
I tried opening the valve, but it will not open further. I have taken both valves apart, and found no difference between hot and cold.

I have checked the supply lines for kinks, etc and found none.
I am at a loss to explain what the problem is, except that it's probably the shut-off valve or the supply line between it and the faucet.

I am probably going to have to replace the entire system due to the leaking faucet. It seems worn out. And the plastic bushing that screws down on top of the faccet (under the handle) is breaking away, mostly due to my having used slip-joint pliers on it a couple of times. I am sure there is a real tool for these things, but I don't have one.

Any ideas on what would cause poor water pressure on one side (hot) besides what I have already mentioned?

Thanks

skymaster 12-09-2008 04:19 PM

It could be as simple as mineral (lime) buildup inside the body. That said, tho I agree it is time to upgrade :}:} in the end be cheaper and faster. If you can, change the stops ( valves) underneath also, go with the newer quarter turn ball valves, they give full pressure.

cq dx cq dx de hz1ab ( no longer :( ) -.-. --.- -.. -..-

KE2KB 12-09-2008 05:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skymaster (Post 196089)
It could be as simple as mineral (lime) buildup inside the body. That said, tho I agree it is time to upgrade :}:} in the end be cheaper and faster. If you can, change the stops ( valves) underneath also, go with the newer quarter turn ball valves, they give full pressure.

cq dx cq dx de hz1ab ( no longer :( ) -.-. --.- -.. -..-

Thanks for the help. Do you think lime buildup would be higher on the hot than the cold?
I'll look for those ball valves. If I'm going to get under the sink, I want it to be the last time. I'll go for a new drain, trap, etc as well.

skymaster 12-09-2008 08:58 PM

lime and/or calcium will ALWAYS precipatate out way faster in hot water than cold. Heat will speed up evaporation leaving the minerals etc behind. It is the lime/calcium buildup that destroys hot water heaters and the thinner steel boilers

KE2KB 12-11-2008 07:58 AM

I'll remove the feed tube from the outlet side of the valve (it's a compression fitting), and try a pipe brush to see if I can open it up. I don't expect much from a steel bristled brush, but at least it should give me an idea as to how much buildup there is in there. Perhaps a dremel tool would help?

skymaster 12-11-2008 11:05 AM

Dremel scares me LOL i dont think I would do that. one of the normal problems along with buildup is gradual thinning of the pipe wall thickness, you might do damage with Dremel.

voiles 12-11-2008 07:30 PM

moen
 
contact moen they have a lifetime warr. they will replace cartridge for free, may even send u a new fauc.

KE2KB 12-19-2008 09:49 AM

If I could even find the cartridge, I might have purchased one myself.
To update the problem:
Yesterday, I removed both the hot and cold tubes at the shut-offs, and attached a piece of flexible tubing (which I purchased for this experiment), and turned the valve on full for a few seconds. I got a strong stream of water from the hot, as with the cold, which indicated to me that the shutoff was fine.

I then removed the cartridge from the faucet (once again).
I ran down to the basement to see what I could find to shove down there and "roto-rooter" the supply lines. I found a length of #12 AGW copper wire I had removed from a piece of Romex cable.
I shoved the wire down into each supply from the faucet, until it came out of the supply tube under the sink. Then I pulled from each end several times, thinking that might help to clear whatever was blocking the lines.

I hooked everything back up and turned on the faucet. To my surprise, I now have good pressure on both sides.
I'm not sure what I did. Whether it was the flushing out of the shut-off valve, or the roto-rootering with the copper wire, I don't know.

Finding that the shut-offs are working makes me feel a lot easier about replacing the faucet one day. At least I won't have to any work other than under the sink. I was thinking I would have to do a lot more if the shut-off needed to be replaced.

The only reason I even want to replace the faucet now is that it leaks slightly when it's turned on. The water runs into the sink, so it's not a real issue, but eventually I think it will need to be replaced.


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