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bpinhigh 10-13-2008 06:26 PM

Low flow solutions
 
Just got an estimate to replace my service line to the house $6k, can't afford that. According to local utility i have a half inch lead line coming into the house. I have 3 baths and 2 kitchens, house has been replumbed inside with a PEX home run system. Water pressure is 70 psi. Looking for solutions???

Anyone know if i add a water tank (like they use in well sytems) if that will solve the flow problem? I was thinking of getting a 80-100 gallon pressurized tank and putting right it after the water meter. Would I need a pump? heck will this even work?

Cheers

ScottR 10-13-2008 06:51 PM

I've never heard of this guy, but this seems to be a sensible pictorial of how it could be done: http://www.ronhazelton.com/projects/...r_pressure.htm

Though I think that you might be right about a storage tank (they only show a small pressure tank in that link), because trying to suck more water through your lead pipe may collapse it.

I think you'd want Water Main -> Backflow prevention valve -> Storage Tank -> Pump -> Pipe with pressure tank installed (small one) -> PEX Manifolds/Water Heater, etc.

Edit: Added backflow valve above.. Just guessing, but that would probably be code with a tank and a pump.. If code allows those to be hooked up to a water main at all in your area.


I'm just throwing that in as my take.. I'd be interested to see if anyone with experience in this knows the best course of action.

InPhase277 10-14-2008 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bpinhigh (Post 171873)
Just got an estimate to replace my service line to the house $6k, can't afford that. According to local utility i have a half inch lead line coming into the house. I have 3 baths and 2 kitchens, house has been replumbed inside with a PEX home run system. Water pressure is 70 psi. Looking for solutions???

Anyone know if i add a water tank (like they use in well sytems) if that will solve the flow problem? I was thinking of getting a 80-100 gallon pressurized tank and putting right it after the water meter. Would I need a pump? heck will this even work?

Cheers

When you say "half inch lead line", how do you mean? Is it like "I will lead the band", or "Colonel Mustard, in the library with the lead pipe"?

4just1don 10-14-2008 03:21 AM

That "lead" line is dangerous to your health especially smaller kids and elderly people,,,and well might make you OLD before your time. Do a bit of searching and see how the important people of old were poisoned by the lead contaners they drank out of. Its only a matter of time that is fails anyway,,,may as well beat the reaper to its demise.

I well agree that IS alot of money,,,get a few more bids,,,how far of run is this?? part of the cost tearing up any streets out front for a hook up?? It all adds up TOO quick,but your health may well be priceless!!

Where do you live???In the north where frost levels, dictate pipe be buried deep??

biggles 10-14-2008 08:24 AM

you have a restriction on the line into the house with a 1/2" line if it is narrowed down to 1/4" in places the 70 PSI pressure will still show up.dig out your side of the meter and get a direction on the line into the house and trench out for a new copper line and new shut off inside.home rental centers have a trencher that will give you a clean 24" deep troth to lay that pipe in....forget the tank/pump you would still have a retriction into the house.

Marvin Gardens 10-14-2008 10:37 AM

70 psi is a good static pressure. What you have is a flow problem caused by the 1/2" service pipe. Pressure is not the issue until you turn on the water. Then my guess is that the pressure drops because you don't have enough water flow to replace the water in the pipes. Once you turn off the water the pressure builds again.

Short answer is that with a bladder tank you should be able to fix most of that issue. The water will come in a fill the bladder tank. When you use the water the bladder tank will ship put as much as needed while the supply line will try to refill the tank as best it can. Eventually though the bladder tank will run out of steam and you will be left with the situation you have now. But once you shut off the water the bladder tank will fill up again.

This is how well systems work and they do a good job.

bpinhigh 10-14-2008 12:54 PM

Thanks for the input...I did get multiple bids on the new service line. I would love to do it myself, but it is mostly under the street and parking pad, so the logical way to do it is with directional boring. I suspect the major expense is getting the local utility out to close the 1/2 inch tap and put in a 3/4 inch tap on the main. I have replaced the shut-off into the house with a new ball valve and there is copper running from the outside shutoff into the house. Oh and I am in Nebraska.

I thought maybe the EPA would have grants for removing the lead pipe but no luck. Of course here in my neighborhood we all have new sodded yards because of lead levels, thanks to the EPA. I guess kids eat dirt and don't drink water...

I think I am going to try the pressure tank. Any thoughts on if I need a pump or will pressure be fine? it looks like most tanks pressurize to 50 psi and I will have 70psi coming in.

Cheers

Marvin Gardens 10-14-2008 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bpinhigh (Post 172150)
I think I am going to try the pressure tank. Any thoughts on if I need a pump or will pressure be fine? it looks like most tanks pressurize to 50 psi and I will have 70psi coming in.

Like I said earlier it isn't about the pressure it is about your lack of supply.

The larger the tank the more supply you will have for a longer time. If you use large amounts of water once in a while then you might just tough it out and get a smaller tank.

You have to determine your needs.

I have an 80 gallon tank on my well because I don't like the pump going on and off so often. As it is I can run the water for 10 minutes before I run out of pressure (with the pump off).

Ask around at several of the stores that sell these before you go through with this. They might have a better option. It pays to do lots of research before parting with money.

jogr 10-14-2008 02:49 PM

You won't need a pump and you won't need to set any controls on the tank. Your 70 psi water line will supply the pressure. Just add the pressure tank. It will work fine just as MG described. You could even put a pressure reducing valve on your incoming water line before the tank to bring down the pressure.

4just1don 10-14-2008 07:48 PM

where bouts in Nebraska?? I thought I was the lone stranger from this state. People back east still think we round up the covered wagons at nite. they dont realize we just drive them inside the stockades!!(or forts)

jogr 10-15-2008 10:20 AM

That's three of us Huskers on here. I'm close to Lincoln. Ain't it great that we can get wireless internet in our wagons now.

4just1don 10-15-2008 10:25 AM

Gee Jogr,,,your close to our third largest city,,,on fall saturdays anyway!!

I STILL have a cord on mine,,,wonder why I have to go around in circles


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