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Old 03-01-2010, 01:50 PM   #1
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


The problem is that the pipes running to the kitchen sink and the refrigerator water tap were re routed because of a leak in the cement slab and ever since there has been very low hot water pressure to the kitchen sink.

Because marble covered the leak in the copper piping running through the slab, that circuit was abandoned and another was routed through the space between the ground floor ceiling and the upper story's floor. Forgetting about a branch pipe running across the ceiling in another direction where it drops down to provide cold water for the refrigerator ice maker, the 3/4" circuit travels across the breadth of the house (roughly 40') between joists and then makes a 90 to the left where it connects into existing piping just below the level of the ceiling, but several inches inside the wall. At the time, I wonder if that pipe should have been run down the inside of that wall and then over to to the abandoned pipe below the sink.

Except for a few feet along the garage side of the wall between the house and garage, the piping was semi flexible copper. Where it ran perpendicular to joists, core holes were cut 2 or 3" from the bottom of the joist and grommets were used in most cores. They left the pipe laying on the ceiling board, so I attached it to the side of joists where it ran parallel to joists.

I wish I knew exactly which pipe the new hot water feed was connected into. Of course, everything has long been closed up and painted over. From this can anyone hazard an educated guess as to what was done and what the cure may be? Also, to abandon a circuit and replace it like this was a permit required? Did these guys, licensed plumbing contractors, violate a few codes? It cost me $3.200 on top of paying the leak detection guy and a then drywaller o close it all up.

A permit wasn't pulled, if one was needed.

Below are pictures of where lines were abandoned on the kitchen sink end, as well as where the new line connected up. That would be just to the left of the where the wall intersects with the false post (I don't know what it is called.)

The lower picture shows where the 3/4" pipe in the wall and the 1/2" under the sink is cut. You can't see the other end, but it is left open. The pipe to the left is the original 3/4 hot and the one to the right is cold. Both ends were capped.

The upper pic is a close up of where the new connection was made. It was approximately midway in the photo from left to right, perhaps a foot more to the right as viewed.

I think what these guys did was they connected a 3/4" feed to 1/2 running from the upstairs down to the the sink.
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted-pict0202.jpg   Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted-pict0203.jpg   Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted-pict0201.jpg  


Last edited by Klawman; 03-01-2010 at 02:20 PM. Reason: Swap pic for better one
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Old 03-01-2010, 02:42 PM   #2
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


Differentiate between "pressure" and "volume" here. When you first turn on the hot water does it flow as you wish, then slow down=volume problem=piping problem. IF this is the only hot water faucet in the home doing this now, but did not before--there is a restriction somewhere in your new line(s). A water line will build up "static" pressure with no water running. "Dynamic" pressure is maintained by having pipes sized for a "volume/pressure" balance. Is there a chance there may be a new valve in the new system which is not open all the way? Errr--maybe the cold water valve on the water heater, but that should affect all hot water outlet's. David

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Old 03-01-2010, 06:50 PM   #3
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


Hi David.

This is the only hot water faucet in the house with this problem.

The size of the stream and the rate of the flow is not what it should be from the moment it is turned on.

I really don't think the problem is a partially open cold water valve. By the way, the valve on top of the water heater is the type that is either full on or off.

I suppose it could be the kitchen sink faucet, even though my recollection is that the problem was there when the piping was rerouted, but it wasn't until the plumbers worked on it. Is there some way to check that the problem isn't in the faucet or the line connecting the faucet to the flexible lines connecting the faucet to the spiggot? I do not that the sprayer, which is part of the faucet, fairly quickly became blocked up with mineral deposits.

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Old 03-01-2010, 07:03 PM   #4
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


It would be a simple matter to test the pressure and flow---Get your self a nice long 3/8 inch water line-- temporarily disconnect the faucet line--add your new water line and turn it on---

I'm guessing that the plumbers may have done you dirt here--test the flow first--To bad you didn't have your camera when they did the original repairs.

Hello,again--Mike---


Another way to test --switch the hot and cold lines temporarily--That would tell you every thing you need to know--without a trip to the store!!

Last edited by oh'mike; 03-01-2010 at 07:05 PM. Reason: Talked faster than my brain--
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Old 03-01-2010, 09:53 PM   #5
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
It would be a simple matter to test the pressure and flow---Get your self a nice long 3/8 inch water line-- temporarily disconnect the faucet line--add your new water line and turn it on---

I'm guessing that the plumbers may have done you dirt here--test the flow first--To bad you didn't have your camera when they did the original repairs.

Hello,again--Mike---


Another way to test --switch the hot and cold lines temporarily--That would tell you every thing you need to know--without a trip to the store!!
Hey, Mike.

I also have a strong feeling that the plumbers done me wrong. I was wondering about switching the hot and cold lines, which is about as simple as it gets and you know I need things simple, as good as I am at complicating things.

Actually, I may have a few pics around somewhere.

Another problem that bothered me at the time, was they notched a joist/rafter (not sure which it was. I believe it was something like a 2X8) about 2" from the bottom. A neighbor and I reinforced it by securing a strap of steel along the side of the bottom with some lag bolts, kind of like sistering.

I will try switching those lines as soon as dinner is finished. My boss would kill me if I messed with the sink while she is getting dinner on the table.
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Old 03-02-2010, 06:00 AM   #6
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


Good luck on the test------your old pictures may help diagnose the problem without as much drywall damage.--Mike---
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Old 03-02-2010, 09:49 PM   #7
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Low Flow After Pipes Rerouted


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Another way to test --switch the hot and cold lines temporarily--That would tell you every thing you need to know--without a trip to the store!!
After swapping the hot and cold lines, its the cold water that comes out in the weaker stream while there is a nice strong stream of hot. I guess that means the problem doesn't lay with the piping. I would think it has to be something inside of the fixture or the lines to which the flex lines coming from the valve connect. As my recollection one line has been weak ever since the pipes were rerouted, I imagine something washed down the pipes into the faucets during the rerouting. That or rerouting had nothing to do with the problem, which could have existed previously but only been noticed after the pipes were rerouted.

Anyway, I will figure out the problem later. I suppose it could merely be a matter of mineral deposits. At the worst, I should have to spring for a new faucet. Possibly only replace a cartridge valve. Time to do a happy dance, like the driver of the 4 man luge team that won the gold.

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