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-   -   And The Leak Goes On!....Two Visits From the Plumber Later (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/leak-goes-two-visits-plumber-later-101499/)

spyboy 04-14-2011 11:51 AM

And The Leak Goes On!....Two Visits From the Plumber Later
 
A plumber replaced a very old basic Delta kitchen faucet. It took us a week or so to notice that there was a little water coming from where the stainless steel covered hose connected to the cold water copper pipe. A slow leak from where the hose screws into the threaded fitting on the copper pipe.

The plumber came back again and said he could tighten the fitting, which seemed a little strange. But he said that should do it.

Next day some water is still oozing from the same place.

When I called the plumber, he said he would have to cut off a very short piece of the copper feed tube for the cold water and solder in a new piece of copper tube which would have a new fitting for the stainless steel covered hose to screw into. He mentioned that there were rubber washers that would be part of the new fitting that he would be soldering in at the top of the copper pipe.

I didn't think there were any rubber washers (or gaskets) in the fittings that connect the hose line to the faucet, or any rubber gaskets/fittings in the connector on the top of the copper feed line.

He hasn't asked for any more money, but I am getting a little uncomfortable since he has a good reputation, but I don't know enough to give him the go-ahead to cut the copper pipe to install a ~1 inch piece of copper pipe with the new fitting.

I would greatly appreciate any and all comments or questions. This seems like it should have been an easy job for an experienced plumber. I just don't understand enough about plumbing to know if his next step is the right one.

hardwareman 04-14-2011 01:45 PM

seems like the next logical step would be to install a new fitting, let him do it. Some times these things happen even to the most experienced tradesman

spyboy 04-14-2011 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hardwareman (Post 629403)
seems like the next logical step would be to install a new fitting, let him do it. Some times these things happen even to the most experienced tradesman

Thank you very much for responding to my post. I know next to nothing about plumbing but it seems strange to remove such a small piece of the copper pipe with the fitting and use torches and such to replace this small piece of pipe with the fitting on it.

I hope I am wrong, but the vibe I am getting from him is very mixed, and I posted here to try to get an idea if replacing a small piece of copper pipe with the fitting was standard practice or not.

Thanks again for your response.

secutanudu 04-14-2011 03:19 PM

He is probably replacing a valve (not a fitting), which is currently soldered onto the top of the copper pipe. He would cut the pipe down a short amount, and solder on a new valve, which connects to the stainless steel hose.

Probably something like this:
http://s3.pexsupply.com/images/products/medium/r14c.jpg

spyboy 04-14-2011 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by secutanudu (Post 629452)
He is probably replacing a valve (not a fitting), which is currently soldered onto the top of the copper pipe. He would cut the pipe down a short amount, and solder on a new valve, which connects to the stainless steel hose.

Probably something like this:
http://s3.pexsupply.com/images/products/medium/r14c.jpg

The feed lines to the sink have no valves, as is the case with the basement toilet. The upstairs toilet has a valve, I don't know why the kitchen sink and the downstairs toilet have no valves.

The plumber had to turn off the whole house water, when he installed the new Delta faucet.

I know I said I don't know much about plumbing but in this case all he is proposing to do is cut off the connector to the wire mesh hose, and when I asked about how much of the copper feed line he was going to have remove he said, "about an inch".

This is why I have mixed vibes about what he is proposing. The only other thing that I can tell you is that this house is about 60 years old, and at one time there was a garbage disposal, but the previous owners had the garbage disposal removed, (because they didn't like the smell).

I could understand if he was replacing a valve, but in this case it is just a fitting.

Also, can you comment on whether there are any rubber washers or gaskets involved in the connection of the stainless steel hose or the connector at the top of the copper feed tube?

Thank you for your contribution to this thread. Every question or comment gives me (and other readers) a better understanding of what I'm trying to get to, and what the plumber is proposing.

secutanudu 04-14-2011 05:44 PM

Well if he has to shut the water off anyway, then he should be installing a valve (as he should have last time). They are not expensive.

AllanJ 04-14-2011 07:38 PM

Stainless steel or other flexible tubing (hoses if you insist) have ends that screw onto the other pipes and fittings. There is a rubber gasket at each screw on end. Normally the rubber gasket seals where it screws on but once in awhile where it screws on is slanted or nicked and the washer does not seal properly.

spyboy 04-15-2011 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by secutanudu (Post 629537)
Well if he has to shut the water off anyway, then he should be installing a valve (as he should have last time). They are not expensive.

That is a very good point. I don't know why he didn't ask me if I wanted him to install shutoff valves for both the hot and cold pipes. It's not like he was a high priced guy who was trying to sell me things that wouldn't have been worth the extra cost.

spyboy 04-15-2011 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 629596)
Stainless steel or other flexible tubing (hoses if you insist) have ends that screw onto the other pipes and fittings. There is a rubber gasket at each screw on end. Normally the rubber gasket seals where it screws on but once in awhile where it screws on is slanted or nicked and the washer does not seal properly.

Thank you for taking the time to respond, I really appreciate it.

Ok, so the stainless steel flexible tubing has a rubber gasket on each end.

But does is sound right to let the plumber cut off just about an inch of the copper feed line and replace it with an inch of copper pipe with new fitting with the threads?

I don't have a very good feeling about this now, and don't want to make things worse.

Thanks again.

secutanudu 04-15-2011 09:38 AM

If he is just installing an threaded fitting so he can screw on the hose, cutting off an inch of pipe isn't a problem.

DUDE! 04-16-2011 06:52 AM

Take a deep breath. You didn't feel comfortable doing the work yourself. You hired a plumber who you say has a good reputation. Let him do the job, as you said, not like he is trying to make extra $ on the job. Seems to happen to me when connecting new parts to old, you run into other adjustments. This is not a big prodject changing out the faucet. Reading your comments, you are in good hands. :thumbup:

fireguy 04-16-2011 09:12 PM

Your 60 year old house was probably not built with shut off valves on the appliances. I expect the plumber did not have new valves on his work vehicle, having used those parts on other jobs.

However, you are asking the wrong people. We were not there, we do not know the house, what repairs may or may not have been done the last few years, the appliances, nor do we know the plumber, his qualifications, his recent jobs or the material used on those jobs. You need to ask the plumber those questions.

From your questions, I get the feeling you do not trust the plumber to do the job properly. Not knowing you, I am going to make a wild guess & assume you are not in the trades. When we find someone who does not trust the work we do, I normally suggest they find someone else.


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