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-   -   increasing washer supply lines to 3/4" instead of 1/2" (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/increasing-washer-supply-lines-3-4-instead-1-2-a-2269/)

amatchin 04-13-2006 12:45 PM

increasing washer supply lines to 3/4" instead of 1/2"
 
Hi all, my copper water lines were converted to cpvc to the water heater. I had the plumber install two 1/2" cutoffs in the 3/4" lines for future additions for my washer and a utility sink. My question is: Would there be any problems with just using a 3/4" cutoff with a 3/4" T and hooking up the washer and sink lines directly to the T instead of routing the hoses through a 1/2"T, then to the faucets? Is there a technical reason for reducing water lines from 3/4" to 1/2"? Many thanks to all who can help.:confused:

Alan 04-14-2006 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amatchin
Hi all, my copper water lines were converted to cpvc to the water heater. I had the plumber install two 1/2" cutoffs in the 3/4" lines for future additions for my washer and a utility sink. My question is: Would there be any problems with just using a 3/4" cutoff with a 3/4" T and hooking up the washer and sink lines directly to the T instead of routing the hoses through a 1/2"T, then to the faucets? Is there a technical reason for reducing water lines from 3/4" to 1/2"? Many thanks to all who can help.:confused:

Not sure I exactly understand... Are you saying he's taking 3/4" and reducing it to 1/2" just for the Tee and the cutoff, and then going back to 3/4 again ?

Atricaudatus 04-15-2006 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amatchin
Hi all, my copper water lines were converted to cpvc to the water heater. I had the plumber install two 1/2" cutoffs in the 3/4" lines for future additions for my washer and a utility sink. My question is: Would there be any problems with just using a 3/4" cutoff with a 3/4" T and hooking up the washer and sink lines directly to the T instead of routing the hoses through a 1/2"T, then to the faucets? Is there a technical reason for reducing water lines from 3/4" to 1/2"? Many thanks to all who can help.:confused:

If I understand your question correctly, then no, there shouldnt be a problem connecting it in the way you describe. Although I'm not sure what the reason would be. Genrally, you would want a separte set of shut off vavles under the laundry tub, so that it could be serviced without interupting the supply to the washer.

As for sizing the lines, the pipe size is dictated by the volume of water needed for the number and type of fixtures served. The only advantage to not over sizing a hot water line, is that the larger the pipe, the longer you have to run the water before you get hot from the tap. In other words, you have to empty all the cold water from the line first, so a larger line is not always a good thing. 1/2" lines are adequate for a washer and laundry tub.
Hope that helps.
Good luck.

amatchin 04-15-2006 04:23 PM

increasing washer supply lines to 3/4" instead of 1/2"
 
Thank you for the replies. Sorry that I didn't explain very well, I wasn't quite sure myself what I needed to ask. I had the plumber install the cpvc lines (hot and cold) going (in/out) to a new water heater (we moved it over about 6 feet from its original location). It is in the garage.
At the time, I had not decided on how I was going to setup the washer/dryer and sink layout so I ask him to install the 1/2" T to these main 3/4" lines so that I could later install them myself, without interrupting the flow to the water heater. I had him install 1/2" because that was the size of the copper lines. These two cutoffs would then be used as the cutoffs for the w/d.
While planning the layout I wondered if I would have been better off by having him install 3/4" T's instead. That way instead of going from 3/4" to 1/2" for the supply lines and then up to 3/4" again for the faucets, I could just go with the 3/4" directly to the supply lines. We don't use a lot of hot water for laundry and the wait for hot water in the sink wouldn't be a problem. ghesh, I hope I explained this better. Anyway, I thought that perhaps the larger lines would take more volume away from the house supply lines while in use (like the shower):D I am eliminating the extra faucet hookup for the w/d and tying the hoses directly to the shutoff T's, using a 1/2"-3/4" reducer and hose adapter. The garage wall where the supply lines run out is also the wall for the den. It only has paneling and I don't like the idea of having such a flemsy wall on the backside of the plumbing. I wanted to reinforce the wall (the garage door wall took a pounding from Katrina). I ran the piping outside of the wall and will have a shelf running behind the washer/dryer and sink to cover the exposed lines/drain, with easier access to avoid tearing out the sheetrock on the garage side. The adapters for the supply lines to the w/d and sink will be attached to the wall of the shelf. (like the new plumbing fixtures that are concealed within the wall). Again, many thanks for your help.:)


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