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Old 03-19-2010, 11:52 PM   #1
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


I am a widow, and I own a duplex. I recently had a plumber do some repairs in the tenants apartment and he mentioned to me that he turned down her water pressure. I didnt ask why.
Lately I've noticed when she turns on her water I can hear that the pressure is way too high. I think she turned the pressure back up. Im sure there has to be consequences on the plumbing eventually. Do I have to call a plumber out again or is this something I can fix myself? I beleive the water meter is on the outside of the house..which probably gave her access to turning it up. Im not having any pressure issues in my apartment but maybe thats because I have my own meter
I think I better get maintanence insurance through the water company ASAP.

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Old 03-20-2010, 12:00 AM   #2
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


I am unaware of a way to 'turn up' water pressure for the entire residence. Anyone else?

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Old 03-20-2010, 12:04 AM   #3
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Depends on how its plumbed, but the pressure regulator is adjustable.
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Old 03-20-2010, 06:47 AM   #4
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Only way your tenant could turn up her water pressure is if there is a pressure reducing valve in her apartment where the city water line enters.

Its possible that if your tenant did turn the pressure up. Its because it wasn't high enough for taking a shower.

The plumber may not have checked the flow to all faucets before he changed the pressure.

While you "now" hear the water use. You may have been able to hear it all along. But never took notice until the plumber told you about him turning the pressure down.

It could also be that your pressure is just as high as hers. And had that plumber checked, he would have turned your pressure down. And you wouldn't have enough water pressure at your shower.

Might want to just ask your tenant if they turned up the pressure. And why. And maybe then address the plumbing issue that requires that pressure increase.
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Old 03-20-2010, 10:31 AM   #5
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Generally speaking, plumbing fixtures should be designed to handle upto 50 psi. When city supplied water has a pressure much over 50 psi, a pressure regulator will be installed to limit the pressure to 50 psi to prevent damage to plumbing equipment.

If there is a hose bibb located after the pressure regulator (in most homes, there are two hose bibbs, one before the regulator and one after), you can buy a pressure guage at your local big-box retailer that will connect to a garden hose for a little less than $10.

If you measure the presure with the guage and it's 50 psi or less, then everything will be fine. If the pressure is higher, the pressure regulator has a simple screw-type adjustment that will likely require a crecent rench to turn.

As for the tennant, I wouldn't say anything until AFTER you've checked the water pressure. If you find it to be 50 or less, nothing need be said or done. If you find it to be over 50, adjust it down and explain to the tenant that you've adjusted the pressure to the 50 psi that is safe for plumbing equipment, and that any higher pressures could damage a plumbing fixture.

The pressure regulator should look something like this:
http://www.watts.com/pro/_productsFu...&pid=776&ref=2
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Old 03-20-2010, 10:41 AM   #6
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


i run my well at 40/60 with no problem to fixtures. if the plumber turned it down tenant can turn it up. ask plumber why. did he do test or just felt like turning it down
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Old 03-20-2010, 12:17 PM   #7
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Hmmm....both this house & last house have water pressure over 70 psi
Last house that caused an outside water hose to burst when I left it on
This hose I bought heavier duty hoses...only one feed hose to a diverter valve is left on without any problems

I replaced a very old kitchen faucet that was leaking

PSI gauges are available at big box stores
I have one on my RO/DI setup
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Old 03-20-2010, 02:28 PM   #8
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
Generally speaking, plumbing fixtures should be designed to handle upto 50 psi. When city supplied water has a pressure much over 50 psi, a pressure regulator will be installed to limit the pressure to 50 psi to prevent damage to plumbing equipment.

If there is a hose bibb located after the pressure regulator (in most homes, there are two hose bibbs, one before the regulator and one after), you can buy a pressure guage at your local big-box retailer that will connect to a garden hose for a little less than $10.

If you measure the presure with the guage and it's 50 psi or less, then everything will be fine. If the pressure is higher, the pressure regulator has a simple screw-type adjustment that will likely require a crecent rench to turn.

As for the tennant, I wouldn't say anything until AFTER you've checked the water pressure. If you find it to be 50 or less, nothing need be said or done. If you find it to be over 50, adjust it down and explain to the tenant that you've adjusted the pressure to the 50 psi that is safe for plumbing equipment, and that any higher pressures could damage a plumbing fixture.

The pressure regulator should look something like this:
http://www.watts.com/pro/_productsFu...&pid=776&ref=2

Bingo!!
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Old 03-22-2010, 09:51 AM   #9
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Hmmm....both this house & last house have water pressure over 70 psi...
Over the weekend, I was looking over my "Code Check" book, and I seem to recall that it indicated that plumbing codes REQUIRE a pressure regulator if the in comming pressure is 80psi or more (I also seem to recall an irrigation tutorial that also said you need a pressure regulator for your irrigation if the pressure is more than 80psi. I think the other side was that plumbing codes require 40psi minimum.
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Old 03-22-2010, 10:40 PM   #10
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
Over the weekend, I was looking over my "Code Check" book, and I seem to recall that it indicated that plumbing codes REQUIRE a pressure regulator if the in comming pressure is 80psi or more (I also seem to recall an irrigation tutorial that also said you need a pressure regulator for your irrigation if the pressure is more than 80psi. I think the other side was that plumbing codes require 40psi minimum.
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Old 03-22-2010, 10:49 PM   #11
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


I think our book says 20PSI minimum, or whatever the highest minimum required pressure for any fixture in the home is. I'll have to double check.

Edit : It's 15 PSI.
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:03 AM   #12
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


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Originally Posted by Alan View Post
I think our book says 20PSI minimum, or whatever the highest minimum required pressure for any fixture in the home is. I'll have to double check.

Edit : It's 15 PSI.
Double checked my "Code Check" book last night...

IRC says 40 PSI is the minimum, but that UPC says 15 PSI.
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Old 03-23-2010, 08:55 PM   #13
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


They say a pic is worth 1000 words, so here's a pic of a typical pressure regulator.


That bolt on the end changes the pressure. Losen the locknut, then adjust the bolt in or out to change pressure. Usually adjusting in increases pressure and out decreases.

I'm no plumber, but mine is set at 60 PSI, as adjusted using a gauge from a big box store as recomended in an earlier reply.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:29 PM   #14
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


whoever sweated that mess together should be beaten with his own torch!
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:19 PM   #15
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I think my tenant turned up her water pressure. How can I fix this?


Half the guys in my class probably couldn't solder to save their own life. Nobody does it anymore, it's all pex these days. I think i've run 3 houses all copper. Most of my stuff looks tons better than that. I still haven't completely mastered the vertical joint, but they sure aren't that ugly.

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