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-   -   How do I manage a flange that is raised above the floor? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/how-do-i-manage-flange-raised-above-floor-156430/)

CZ DIY 09-10-2012 05:22 PM

How do I manage a flange that is raised above the floor?
 
Hi, so I've got two projects I'm working on that I need assistance with.


1) My downstairs bathroom was re-done so additional plumbing could be attached to it. The plumber however, left a VERY rough surface and the flange raised a bit over the concrete. What should I use to smooth down the surface with and will the raised flange cause any problems?

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...910_160645.jpg

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...910_160718.jpg




2) I'm renovating my garage into an apartment for my disabled Mother. I had a plumber bring in drain lines for shower/toilet. I'll be building a subfloor to raise the flooring. I requested he design it so I could build a 6" subfloor. But as you can see, the flange is 7.5" off the concrete. Should I build a subfloor from 2x8's or can I still manage with 2x6's.
I'm guessing there is no way to get around the fact that I'll need 2x8's (7.5" subfloor). :(

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...910_160905.jpg

Lightfoot 09-10-2012 05:28 PM

1st pic, gonna lay tile? just lay up to it.

second pic, 2 x 6 with a double 3/4 or 1 inch subfloor in the bath should about get you there with tile.
may be cheaper just to go with 2 x 8's, since we don't know how much area you have.

allthumbsdiy 09-10-2012 09:39 PM

project #1 - ditto what lightfoot said. just make sure you do not cover that steel ring/flange. you need that to install your toilet bolts/johnny bolts. also, did you wash that area or something? why is the perimeter, including your 2x4 bottom plate wet?

project #2 - maybe the plumber needed that height to get the proper slope? I think when you factor in the 1" sub-flooring (to prevent tiles from cracking under flex), water-proof liner, mortar, tile thickness, 7.5" height is about what you need imo.

CZ DIY 09-10-2012 10:11 PM

re: Pic 1, yes I will be using tile in there. I'm worried about the rough concrete. It's all uneven. Bits of rock sticking out of the crete mix.

The area isn't wet. You're probably seeing the residue from sheetrock dust creating a contrast. :)

re: Pic 2, does the flange need to be even with the flooring though? Or is it OKAY for the flooring to end up being, say .5" below the flange?
Or do I absolutely have to bring the flooring up to the height of the flange so they're even with each other.

Thanks guys!

allthumbsdiy 09-10-2012 10:18 PM

I'd rather have a toilet flange that is slightly lower because you can always add a spacer ring or use an extra tall wax ring.

If the toilet flange is higher than the floor, you will probably have to shim the toilet

gregzoll 09-10-2012 10:21 PM

Do a "Thick Bed Mortar" before laying the tile http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thick_bed_mortar . That will take care of any rough surface. How much are we saying that the bits of aggregate are sticking up? Something like a 1/2", 1/4", or like a boulder (ie 1"). It is possible that it was left rough, so that the Thick Bed mortar would have something to grab onto, when the tile was done.

CZ DIY 09-10-2012 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1007324)
How much are we saying that the bits of aggregate are sticking up? Something like a 1/2", 1/4", or like a boulder (ie 1"). It is possible that it was left rough, so that the Thick Bed mortar would have something to grab onto, when the tile was done.

Probably about 1/2" at the most. Thanks for the link! :)

DannyT 09-10-2012 11:46 PM

does that elbow on the far right go into another elbow below the floor by any chance? could the floor have been notched so the pipe for the toilet could have been lowered to where you wanted it?


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