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-   -   How to change the shower valve? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/how-change-shower-valve-19325/)

amdspitfire 03-31-2008 05:40 PM

How to change the shower valve?
 
Well long story short, I tried fixing and instead I broke.

The shower has a single knob valve similar to this pic:

http://www.tinotopia.com/log/images/...tebathtemp.jpg

It had a very bad leak and I tried unscrewing a portion of it to get to the "washers". Snapped one of the input lines to the valve.

Now that I royally jacked up, do i rip up the tile in the shower to gain access back there, unsolder the old valve and put in a new one?

This is a rental, whats the easiest way to change the valve?

Ron The Plumber 03-31-2008 05:45 PM

Won't your landload fix this for you? Or are you the owner?

Marlin 03-31-2008 05:47 PM

Usually you can open the wall behind the shower body to gain access. If it's a Sheetrock wall behind it that's the way to go as Sheetrock is usually easier to patch then a tile wall. Removing the tiles to get to it would be the next step.
That's assuming the shower body is totally FUBAR. Are you sure what you broke isn't a replaceable part?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber (Post 112641)
Won't your landlord fix this for you? Or are you the owner?

If it were my rental and he were the tenant he would now be responsible for the damage as he broke an otherwise repairable shower body.
The advice I always give to renters on here is don't mess with it. Just tell the landlord you have a leak and need a plumber over there.


It sounds like he is the owner though.

Ron The Plumber 03-31-2008 05:49 PM

Since you said rental I'm guessing your the owner, yes access the back will be better, if not possible, then time to access the front side.

amdspitfire 03-31-2008 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber (Post 112644)
Since you said rental I'm guessing your the owner, yes access the back will be better, if not possible, then time to access the front side.

Unfortunately I am the owner. :censored:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marlin (Post 112642)
Usually you can open the wall behind the shower body to gain access. If it's a Sheetrock wall behind it that's the way to go as Sheetrock is usually easier to patch then a tile wall. Removing the tiles to get to it would be the next step.
That's assuming the shower body is totally FUBAR. Are you sure what you broke isn't a replaceable part?

It's a layer of tile then Sheetrock.

It's an old delta style shower valve, it is FUBAR and the entire valve needs replacing.

Now do I start removing tile and cut the Sheetrock, or do I have to pretty much redo the entire shower fixture wall side?

Ron The Plumber 03-31-2008 05:59 PM

No way for you to access the back side?

amdspitfire 03-31-2008 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber (Post 112644)
Since you said rental I'm guessing your the owner, yes access the back will be better, if not possible, then time to access the front side.

No access from back, the two bathrooms share one wall, so it will have to be from the front tile side.

Marlin 03-31-2008 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amdspitfire (Post 112646)

Now do I start removing tile and cut the Sheetrock, or do I have to pretty much redo the entire shower fixture wall side?


What is on the other side of the wall? If it's a Sheetrock wall on the other side you can change the valve out from the back. If it's an outside wall, a block wall, wood paneling, or something else which will be difficult to remove then you need to go from the front. You can do it by just removing a few tiles and cutting out the Sheetrock. If you're careful you could probably even save the tiles.

Ron The Plumber 03-31-2008 06:05 PM

Line the tub with drop cloths or anything you can use to protect the tub sides and bottom from scratches and chips, then start the remove of one tile at a time.

amdspitfire 03-31-2008 06:14 PM

One I have enough access room is the valve soldered into the pipes? Do I use a torch on them?

Marlin 03-31-2008 06:18 PM

The old one you will probably have to cut out. The new one you will have to solder in and may have to move the supply lines higher/lower and/or forward/back.

Double A 03-31-2008 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amdspitfire (Post 112663)
One I have enough access room is the valve soldered into the pipes? Do I use a torch on them?

Once you have it exposed, get a plumber out there to install the new valve. Why? Because an investment property that has or will have tenants in it is not where you want to learn to solder. You want this job done properly and quickly so you can get this repaired and get this investment property back to a positive cash flow.

Last thing you want is for this thing to have a leak on it that you're unaware of doing damage to a property that your tenants don't really care about. Can you trust them to call you right away if they find water on the floor? Or will they just assume someone keeps spilling it there until the floor and the walls rot out?

plumber Jim 03-31-2008 11:18 PM

I Assume you put a wrench on the valve body and ended up breaking one of the small copper tube connect to it? like 1/4 inch or 3/8 inch i forget. the older delta shower bodies had those cheap copper tubes. anyways, I had a customer do the same thing. i was able to open some of the tile just enough to still be covered by the trim plate. then i desoldier the old one off and resoldiered a new delta valve in. I wouldn't suggest you try that though a good plumber can do it. you don't wan't to be using a torh in such a tight space without knowing what you are doing.

amdspitfire 03-31-2008 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by plumber Jim (Post 112786)
I Assume you put a wrench on the valve body and ended up breaking one of the small copper tube connect to it? like 1/4 inch or 3/8 inch i forget. the older delta shower bodies had those cheap copper tubes. anyways, I had a customer do the same thing. i was able to open some of the tile just enough to still be covered by the trim plate. then i desoldier the old one off and resoldiered a new delta valve in. I wouldn't suggest you try that though a good plumber can do it. you don't wan't to be using a torh in such a tight space without knowing what you are doing.

You got it, exactly what I did.

I put a screw through the drywall behind the fixture and found out its coming out right behind the dining area. Great access from behind. Should I cut open the drywall, from behind ?

plumber Jim 04-01-2008 12:39 AM

If you have access from the drywall behind then i would say go for it. and if you get another delta valve it will make it all the easier as the pipes should line up nicely.


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