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aprilt13 07-09-2013 07:34 PM

hot water fills in the toilet
 
So our plumbing is totally backwards upstairs. Cold is on the left and hot is on the right. Even one of our toilets fills with hot water. Recently, we had some water damage on the ceiling of the first floor. I called a plumber and he came out to fix a wax ring and charge me an arm and a leg for something I could have done myself. He also wouldn't warranty the work because our toilet fills with hot water, which may be causing the wax ring to melt. Question:

1. Could hot water cause the wax ring (gasket) to melt?

2. Should I replace the wax ring with a neoprene ring myself?

3. How important is it to fix the hot water in the toilet problem? The company quoted me at $500 just to fix it, not repair the drywall they would have to rip out.

aprilt13 07-09-2013 07:37 PM

hot water in toilet!
 
Duplicate post due to thread merge

TarheelTerp 07-09-2013 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aprilt13 (Post 1213869)
So our plumbing is totally backwards upstairs.
Cold is on the left and hot is on the right.
Even one of our toilets fills with hot water.

Recently, we had some water damage on the ceiling of the first floor.
I called a plumber ...
The company quoted me at $500 just to fix it, not repair the drywall they would have to rip out.

get a second opinion.
if it's "totally backwards" it might be a simple fix to reverse connections well before the upstairs. And yeah, get it done.

Red Squirrel 07-09-2013 07:46 PM

Well, hot water may help kill bacteria faster, so it's not a bad idea. LOL.

But if the whole bathroom is reverse I am thinking the supply lines leading to the bathroom are mixed up. Probably a very easy fix. Try to follow the pipes as best you can to see where they go. If you run the hot water you can also touch them to see which is which.

Hopefully enough of it is exposed where you can find the problem and fix it there instead of having to cut through walls.

Thurman 07-09-2013 07:48 PM

Um, Um, Um--After giving this one some thought: 1) How old is this dwelling? 2) Has the water being "backwards" been the case since the dwelling was built/you have lived there? 3) As much as I bet you don't want to call another plumber you may need one to determine IF the water lines for the water heater are reversed. Which brings up this question: Has the water heater been changed since you have been in this dwelling and IF SO is this when this problem started? 4) Question #1: I seriously doubt that hot water would damage a wax style ring unless the hot water was run over this wax style ring for some continuous length of time. 5) Question #2: The type of sealing ring for a toilet if strictly up to you, back to answer for #1. 6) Tearing out part of a wall to find a cold water supply line would be the answer for the toilet, BUT--what about the rest of the dwelling? Back to my answer "3)".

oh'mike 07-09-2013 07:52 PM

I'd fix it if it were my house----

I can't speak to the cost---$500 might not be a bad price---you ould ask a different plumber or post some pictures here---the difficulty level might be high or low,depending on how the place is piped

aprilt13 07-09-2013 07:56 PM

1. Townhouse was built in 2005
2. This has always been the case since we have lived here (only 2 years).
3. Lines seem reversed for everything-but only upstairs- 3 sink faucets, 2 shower faucets and one toilet (the other toilet upstairs fills with cold water).
4. Water heater has not been changed since the house was built (has a date on it).
5. Ugh... another plumber :( already spent $177 for 30 minutes of work and a 5 dollar wax ring! And I still don't know if that is what caused the water damage to the ceiling on the 1st floor!

Thanks for your help!

joecaption 07-09-2013 07:57 PM

Is this a new house?
Who did the plumbing?
Not sure why your upset with this plumber, I presume your the one that called him to come fix the toilet, he fix it, you chose not to.

SeniorSitizen 07-09-2013 07:59 PM

If this is in new construction I would think you would have some recourse.

aprilt13 07-09-2013 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1213890)
Is this a new house?
Who did the plumbing?
Not sure why your upset with this plumber, I presume your the one that called him to come fix the toilet, he fix it, you chose not to.


It is a newer house-built in 2005. Not sure who did the plumbing becuase we weren't the first owners.

Upset with the plumber because he didn't tell me until he finished the work that it wouldn't be warrantied. And if he thought the hot water would melt the ring, why wouldn't he put in the neoprene ring? Also, I chose not to because I was unsure where the leak was coming from that was cuasing the water damage on the 1st floor ceiling.

TheEplumber 07-09-2013 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aprilt13 (Post 1213871)
Question:

1. Could hot water cause the wax ring (gasket) to melt?

2. Should I replace the wax ring with a neoprene ring myself?

3. How important is it to fix the hot water in the toilet problem? The company quoted me at $500 just to fix it, not repair the drywall they would have to rip out.

1. Yes. That's why in floor heat is not ran under toilets

2. Sure- or pay the plumber again :jester:

3. Very important. surprised the toilet hasn't broke.

500.00 sounds ok- not knowing the pipe layout in the ceiling.
It could be as easy as flipping the shower cartridge, swapping the lav supply lines and pulling new pipe to the toilet (the only ceiling patch)

RWolff 07-09-2013 09:14 PM

I used to have hot water in my toilet in Vermont back in the 80s, I made it that way so that when I went to sit down it was plesantly warm, It was very nice, no condensation from cold water etc in the summer either. I doubt the wax ring would melt from hot water, mine didnt, but then I didn't have the water heater cranked up 150 degrees either.

The toilet itself should have a short outlet horn that seats inside the flange opening in such a way that like a funnel- water should never come out there unless there is a plugged or partially drain and it backs up.
The wax ring mainly keeps sewer gas out. I've never had a toilet leak water out the wax ring area, not even the one I had hot water going to, but then I've never plugged a toilet so bad the waste backed up thru the pipe and out the wax ring area.

Sounds like there's a restriction, partial plug or bad design and the line is not draining as fast as it SHOULD.

Ghostmaker 07-09-2013 09:32 PM

Down in your basement you will find 2 water pipes that feed the water upstairs on that bath. If you switch the hot and cold at that point your upstairs bath will be all good.

ben's plumbing 07-09-2013 09:39 PM

as mentioned pictures would help....but if you had a company out and they were able to see where it may have been crossed at and they have to cut the wall...500.00 sounds very reasonable.....ben sr

ddawg16 07-09-2013 09:52 PM

Ya know, hot sh!t could take on a whole new meaning.

I stayed in a hotel room recently where the toilet was plumbed to the hot water......NOT pleasant.....


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