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nking 10-28-2010 10:48 PM

Hot water
 
I have very hot water for a very short time. What do I need to do?

Just Bill 10-29-2010 06:05 AM

I assume you mean you quickly run out of hot water??? If yes, the problem is probably a disentegrated dip tube. It is a tube under the cold water inlet and direct water to the bottom of the tank. When they break off, cold water dilutes the hot water at the top quicker than normal. Fairly easy to replace, but depending on the age of the heater, it may be worth consider replacing the heater. Another telltale symptom is the appearance of little white flakes clogging the faucet aerators.

jlhaslip 10-29-2010 10:16 AM

If your water source has a high level of minerals, they might be caking the inside of the tank, thereby reducing the tank's available volume.
Happens here a lot.
The fix is to replace the tank. They are difficult to clean out.

Homerepairguy 10-29-2010 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nking (Post 524684)
I have very hot water for a very short time. What do I need to do?

If you have a standard (not solar) electric water heater, your lower heating element may be burned out or the thermostat might be bad.

In standard electric water heaters, there are two heating elements, one higher up and one lower. If the lower element does not go on, hot water will occur in only the top 1/3 or so of the heater.

If this is the type of water heater you have and need help in determining whether it is the heating element or the thermostat, shout and I or someone will help you out.

AllanJ 10-31-2010 07:21 AM

You should not have to use the "very hot" setting on the water heater dial.

When you turn the dial down and then get a very short time of usable hot water, then the above mentioned problems need to be investigated.

Almost all electric water heaters have two thermostats, one under each cover plate. Both should be set to the same temperature. About 120 degrees is today's recommendation for home use. You can go a little higher if there are times when several baths are taken in a short period of time.

*** I don't know when there is a legitimate use for the very hot setting, any more than the 100 plus mph portion of a car's speedometer. I suppose that from time to time a home grade water heater is installed in a commercial setting such as in a restaurant, where 180-190 degree water is needed, but this usually means a somewhat shorter life span and voided warranty for the heater.

DangerMouse 10-31-2010 08:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homerepairguy (Post 524972)
In standard electric water heaters, there are two heating elements, one higher up and one lower. If the lower element does not go on, hot water will occur in only the top 1/3 or so of the heater.

This seems to be the most common (and easiest to fix) reason for this behavior.
HRG gets my vote on this one.

DM


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