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-   -   Hose bibb: worn out screw (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/hose-bibb-worn-out-screw-133327/)

autorun 02-11-2012 09:16 AM

Hose bibb: worn out screw
 
3 Attachment(s)
Hi all,

Need your help again :)
I am trying to fix a dripping hose bibb. Since the screw on the top has worn out so badly, I tried PB Blaster to lossen it up, made a new Phillips slot and used a screw extractor without success. It will be perfect if I can replace the whole host bibb. However, I think it is a soldering type and I don't feel comfortable to deal with flame unless it is the last resort.

Any advice how to take out the top screw?

Thank you all.
James

Grampa Bud 02-11-2012 09:20 AM

Have you tried just snugging up the packing gland nut that is just below the handle?

joecaption 02-11-2012 09:22 AM

Unscrew the whole thing and toss it in the trash, go buy a new one for a 100% sure way to fix it.

Grampa Bud 02-11-2012 09:25 AM

Yes this a soldered hose bib, but to install one safely you have to remove the shaft, handle, gland nut, and valve washer anyway, so why not just take this picture with you to Menards, Home Depot, or a plumbing supply and get all new guts to put in your perfectly good valve body. No soldering, and all new parts.

Daniel Holzman 02-11-2012 09:49 AM

Maybe I am hallucinating, but don't I see a hex on the valve where it attaches to the (copper?) pipe leaving the wall? If so, you just put a wrench on it and take the whole thing off. I have lots of hose bibs around my house, they are all threaded, look a lot like yours.

joecaption 02-11-2012 09:54 AM

I can see a hex in both pictures.
A new valve would cost less then all the parts needed to fix it.
Just clean off the paint right behind the hex to see if you can see threads.

autorun 02-11-2012 10:13 AM

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Thx joecaption, Grampa Bud and Daniel.

It will be perfect if I can replace the whole bib. I tried to unscrew the whole bib with 2 wrenches, but it wasn't turned a bit. Since I guess it is soldered, I didn't put a lot of brutal force to turn it.

I will do this.
From joecaption, "Just clean off the paint right behind the hex to see if you can see threads."

I hope it is threaded and I can replace it with a nice one.

plumberinlaw 02-11-2012 10:27 AM

If you insist in repairing it, grind off the head with a dremel, remove handle, grab what is left of screw with vice grips and turn. If that does not work you will have to drill it out and re-tap it. If it is threaded (hard to see with all that paint) two pipe wrenches will have it off in 30 seconds. If it is sweated turn off the water open the valve remove with torch, hold hot valve with channel lock pliers to pull off pipe. removal should take about 1 minute

Daniel Holzman 02-11-2012 10:47 AM

Take off the paint as recommended, then you can see if it is threaded (I think I can see the threads even in the photo, but cannot be sure). If it is threaded, you need two people and two pipe wrenches to avoid damaging the pipe. Put one pipe wrench on the pipe just after the hex, and one pipe wrench on the hex. The paint may have frozen the valve on, you can break it free with a two foot length of pipe over the pipe wrench (I have a couple of persuaders I keep around for just this sort of problem). Make sure the pipe wrench holding the pipe in place is tight and facing the correct direction, else you will destroy the pipe and have a bigger headache. Assuming it is threaded of course.

joecaption 02-11-2012 10:54 AM

If you find it's steel pipe then it also could be stuck because of contact with the bronze valve.
I'd apply some heat on the valve before I tryed using a cheater bar.
One trick I've used is apply heat, dump cold water on it then apply heat again. The expantion and contraction of the valve will break the corroision bond.

plummen 02-11-2012 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grampa Bud (Post 850299)
Yes this a soldered hose bib, but to install one safely you have to remove the shaft, handle, gland nut, and valve washer anyway, so why not just take this picture with you to Menards, Home Depot, or a plumbing supply and get all new guts to put in your perfectly good valve body. No soldering, and all new parts.

Well disregard my previous post,that was a sweated joint.

autorun 02-11-2012 11:55 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Hi all,

These are the pictures. Would you please help to tell me whether it is solder or threaded. There are 2 iron things on the copper pipe.

Hope the pictures can show the detail such that you can help me out.

Thx :)

plummen 02-11-2012 11:59 AM

Wow,I wouldve sworn that looked like a threaded joint to me! :eek:
I owe grandpa a steak dinner! :laughing:

plummen 02-11-2012 12:03 PM

Well now that we know what youre up against heres another idea.
Unscrew the packing nut under the handle then go ahead and turn the handle like youre opening it .
Just keep turning it till the stem comes out of the faucet then youll have access to the screw and washer on bottem of the stem to replace them.
Reverse procedure to reinstall :)

plummen 02-11-2012 12:05 PM

But in my defense that particular faucet was designed to go on a piece of threaded pipe. :laughing:


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