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-   -   Hi from OR: painfully-won plumbing tips (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/hi-painfully-won-plumbing-tips-5171/)

ddc 12-02-2006 05:54 PM

Hi from OR: painfully-won plumbing tips
 
Doing my own plumbing on an addition to save $$. Already got gigged by the inspector.

Here's some info I just learned yesterday:

1. Don't use white PVC - anywhere - except outside. I know it's good to a gagillion PSI and everything, but It's not to code for use inside (in OR, at least). if you're using plastic, use CPVC. If there's another kind, let me know. Apparently, you might even get in trouble using it in your pump house, because it's "inside".

SO does anyone know WHY you can't use PVC for your inside cold water? The inspector didn't really know why.

2. Beware old plumbing guides. For instance, EVERY p-trap must be individually vented, at the level of the top of the trap. (again, in OR, at least). You can tie the vents together somewhere before passing through the roof, but each must originate at a single trap.

And keep in mind that any horizontal parts of your vent should slope downward a little, toward the sewer, to keep the vent from filling with rainwater.

3. Washing machine trap must be set ABOVE the floor line.

Hope this helps!
ddc

Ron The Plumber 12-02-2006 06:11 PM

This is your lucky day, I live and work here in Or so you shall get your answers.

Quote:

SO does anyone know WHY you can't use PVC for your inside cold water?
Thats just what is required by code here In Oregon, pvc can only be used outside the foundation of a structure.

Quote:

Beware old plumbing guides. For instance, EVERY p-trap must be individually vented, at the level of the top of the trap. (again, in OR, at least). You can tie the vents together somewhere before passing through the roof, but each must originate at a single trap.

And keep in mind that any horizontal parts of your vent should slope downward a little, toward the sewer, to keep the vent from filling with rainwater.
Thats what code requires again, now depends on where your at, some inspectors will allow flat venting, some won't.

Quote:

Washing machine trap must be set ABOVE the floor line.
Bottom of trap must be a min of 6" above said point.

Thanks DDC hope I helped verify what is required here in Oregon.

majakdragon 12-02-2006 09:07 PM

Most Codes are for safety and proper operation of the Plumbing system. Not all Codes are equal and they DO change occasionally. Bad thing is that some States use a State Code while others also have Local codes that can be different. While we try to answer all questions, I like to refer to "check your local codes" most of the time. Even for the DIYer, a call to the Code office can save a lot of re-work on a project. Where I live, we can use PVC for cold water supply lines. CPVC for hot water. Florida (some parts) allows galvanized pipe for gas lines while Ohio didn't. All part of the wonderful world of trying to keep up with codes.

troubleseeker 12-02-2006 11:17 PM

Don't know the reasoning behind it, but pvc is not accepted for supply lines by some codes. Schedule 40 pvc always seemed stronger in my mind than plastic tubing, but they never asked me when the wrote the code.

Bonus 12-03-2006 01:05 AM

" Bottom of trap must be a min of 6" above said point." What's the reasoning behind this, any ideas?

ddc 12-03-2006 01:28 AM

Thanks for the replies, everybody!
 
I definitely should have checked with the building department first, rather than acting on my (faulty) assumptions.

The code in OR for the "standpipe" above the washing machine p-trap is 18 to 30 inches. Frigidaire requires 24 inches for the washer we're considering. I guess they shoot out that water pretty fast. I'm glad I found that out early.

ddc 12-03-2006 02:02 AM

Height of Washing machine standpipe in OR
 
This especially for Ron in Eugene:
Thanks for the verification on the trap to floor min height. Is the 18 to 24 inches for the inlet pipe (or standpipe) measured from the top of the trap or the bottom? I've gone the conservative route and done it from the top of the trap (I moved my Oatey box up a bit), but I was just wondering.

majakdragon 12-03-2006 07:09 AM

18" for a standpipe seems (to me) a very short pipe. My thinking concerns siphoning the washer tub while it is running. The top of the standpipe should be at least the height of the washer tub. The new washer units have much stronger pumps than the older ones and I have seen 2" pipe used (instead of the old standard 1-1/2") to prevent overflowing. I, also, would be interested in the reason for the 6" above the floor for the trap.

Ron The Plumber 12-03-2006 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddc (Post 25659)
Is the 18 to 24 inches for the inlet pipe (or standpipe) measured from the top of the trap or the bottom? I've gone the conservative route and done it from the top of the trap (I moved my Oatey box up a bit), but I was just wondering.

804.1 of the UPC Oregon Admendments states Standpipe will be 18" to 30" above it's trap.

Bottom of trap will be min of 6" and no more then 18" above floor.

Min Pipe size of 2" for drain

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonus " Bottom of trap must be a min of 6" above said point." What's the reasoning behind this, any ideas?
Good question, one I can not answer, I'm thinking reason is to make sure the box is installed at the min of 24" off the floor So set box 24" to 54" off floor.

ddc 12-03-2006 07:50 PM

Thanks Ron!
 
I wonder if the Oregon codes are online?

Ron The Plumber 12-03-2006 07:54 PM

I don't think they are.

gitnerdun 12-05-2006 08:11 AM

The one golden rule I learned as a young newbie plumber's helper was, "don't ask why, just do it right".
Then there is some old story about monkeys in a cage and no one knows why that is just the way it is done.

AllGoNoShow 12-05-2006 02:33 PM

There are some health concerns with PVC. As I recall they give off some ridicously toxic fumes if there is fire or something and they start melting. Could be why they are not okay for indoor use, i dunno.


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