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Old 04-15-2009, 09:38 AM   #1
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Heated sidewalk


Need some advice,
The water table under my newly constructed home is approx. 8in. below the basement floor. I have taken care of this issue with a gravity drain. Though I have been thinking of another way to remove this approx. 1-2 gals/min water. Would it be possible to grundfous pump this water through pex, wrapped around both hot water tank pvc exhaust and forced air pvc exhaust to increase temp, then exit home to be routed under the sidewalk (not yet in) with an approx. length of 70ft. Since this water has to leave the sump anyway, I would then dump it into a stream 40ft from where the side walk would end. If the water temp could rise to at least70+ deg. Would it be enough to melt the snow under the sidewalk? Erie PA

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Old 04-15-2009, 10:48 AM   #2
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Heated sidewalk


You want to pump 110' total?
Sounds like it will freeze in the winter unless you dig it down past the frost line

Quote:
grundfous


Around here it is illegal to discharge sump pump onto the street, sidewalk or into a stream. Usually you need a break in the plumbing drain for the sump, mine is 6" after it exits the basement
This allows the line to drain properly

The other issue you will have is when the pump shuts off
Any residual water in the line will freeze - even small drips etc
It should melt when the pump kicks back on, but it could build up

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Old 04-15-2009, 11:17 AM   #3
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Heated sidewalk


I believe you are talking about a "poor-mans" snowmelt system, but you are trying to take it up 2 or 3 notches. It's a neat idea, but it won't work. First off you would need 'RV' antifreeze mixed 50/50 with water in a closed heated loop under your sidewalk to protect the heat medium (water) from freezing. Then you need a sustainable 140deg F heat source to attempt to maintain roughly a
34deg F surface temperature on your sidewalk. Thirty four degrees is the minimum temperature you will need to melt snow/ice and trying to do this on even a 30deg F day can be a real adventure. I think that if you tryed to heat your snowmelt loops your way the best temperature you will be able to attain just in your heated home will only be about 90deg F and the temperature would never be above ground temperature outdoors for the winter. Sorry.
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Old 04-15-2009, 12:37 PM   #4
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Heated sidewalk


Quote:
Originally Posted by tnycmiel View Post
If the water temp could rise to at least70+ deg. Would it be enough to melt the snow under the sidewalk? Erie PA
Wait, are you just trying to pump water out ?
Or try to melt snow? Or both?

Why would you want to melt snow under a sidewalk?
How would snow get under a sidewalk
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Old 04-15-2009, 12:43 PM   #5
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Heated sidewalk


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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Wait, are you just trying to pump water out ?
Or try to melt snow? Or both?

Why would you want to melt snow under a sidewalk?
How would snow get under a sidewalk
Both, removing the water and melting snow on top of the sidewalk.
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Old 04-15-2009, 12:49 PM   #6
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Heated sidewalk


If it was a continous flow of water it may keep the sidewalk above freezing. But probably not, especially at 1-2g per minute. A shower flows at 2.5g per minute. A 50g water heater with a 4500w heating element can't heat the water for continous output for more then say 20 minutes
So you would be able to pump the water
But I doubt you will achieve anywhere near 70 degree water in the winter

My incoming water in the winter can dip down to 32-35 degrees
Sounds like this will just freeze up in the winter
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Old 04-15-2009, 05:39 PM   #7
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Heated sidewalk


I agree with the rest here that this is not a good idea. You would definately need a closed loop system running 120 degree water probably 20-30% constant thru the winter months to keep the concrete at 40 degrees. The system as you describe would most likely freeze up before it exited the pipes.
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Old 04-16-2009, 06:29 PM   #8
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Heated sidewalk


hmmm Maybe


Last edited by II Weeks; 04-16-2009 at 07:04 PM.
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