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Old 02-17-2007, 07:52 PM   #1
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Groaning pipes


Hi...I know this is probably asked all the time. But we have groaning pipes. Our pipes groan after flushing either the master bath toilet, or the bathroom downstairs in the basement (split entry home). When they start groaning we can turn on the faucet water and slowly turn it off, or flush the hallway bathroom toilet (next to master bedroom). They will also groan for a second when the washing machine is going in the basement (when it finishes it's first fill only-stops after a second by itself). A couple weeks ago it did it when it dishwasher was going-each time it stopped filling. That was fun in the middle of the night! That's the only time the dishwasher has caused it.

But mostly, it's just the master toilet and the downstairs toilet that do it. And not all the time. It goes in phases. It will for a while, then won't. For me, it seems every time I stand there ready to turn on the water, it doesn't happen. But when I get back into bed, it does.

I've read that some people say it is the fill valve or something in the toilets that need to be replaced. Doesn't seem like that would be it for us, since it happens in other places as well.

I've also read that it could be a pipe rubbing against something in the wall. But I am scared to call someone to come out and rip up the walls looking for the pipe. Plus, we really can't afford a high bill from a plumber right now.

So, does anyone have any ideas or suggestions? I would really appreciate it!

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Old 02-17-2007, 08:29 PM   #2
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Groaning pipes


Check the pressure on the house, get a pressure gage that attaches to an outside faucet, see what it's at, then get back to us.

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Old 03-24-2007, 06:03 PM   #3
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Groaning pipes


All right...sorry it took me so long to get back to this. I walked right by the gauges on two trips to the store before finding it (never walked right by someone to help find it of course)--top shelf in a tiny little box.
Anyway, the pressure gauge says that the pressure is about 75. I did the a bit of research, and see that normal is 45-65. So, is 10 over enough to cause my problems? What, if anything, should I do?

Thanks so much! It's been going on long enough that the kids only use the hallway bathroom cause it doesn't make the noise. And if one of the other ones does, it's a joke in the house that they both yell "water" (meaning turn on the water to make the noise stop)!.
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:27 AM   #4
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Groaning pipes


I'm not a pro plumber like Ron, but if your water pressure is that high, I would recommend getting a Pressure Reducing Valve installed after your meter and adjusting it no more than 60 psi.
A PRV creates a closed system, so you also might have to install a small expansion tank at your water heater (if you don't already have one) to prevent leaking through the temperature-and-pressure relief valve when the water heats up.
Good Luck!
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:37 AM   #5
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Yes reduce the pressure on the house like Mike says, 75psi is reaching the point where code takes a role in the requirments, code says 80psi or higher needs a pressure reducer valve installed.
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Old 03-25-2007, 02:48 PM   #6
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Groaning pipes


All right...so that IS what is causing the noise?

Then, do we need to install a pressure reducer valve, or can the water dept reduce our pressure somehow? And if we do need to install a valve, is it something we can do-or do we need to hire someone?

Thanks so much for all your help!
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Old 03-25-2007, 07:40 PM   #7
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Groaning pipes


You will need to install it, install it after the meter. Can you install it? If you know how to work with water pipe, and install it leak free, if not then do call in a plumber for help.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:15 PM   #8
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Groaning pipes


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber View Post
Yes reduce the pressure on the house like Mike says, 75psi is reaching the point where code takes a role in the requirments, code says 80psi or higher needs a pressure reducer valve installed.
The situation replied to by this comment is exactly the same as ours except we just had a new prv installed and that is when the groaning of our pipes started. The groaning is coming from the pipe at the prv. We have really high pressure coming from the street which between 100 and 130 or more. Our prv is set to reduce the pressure to 55. When it fluctuates up to 130 or more from the street, is that too much for our prv to handle?
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:02 AM   #9
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Groaning pipes


Go to:
http://www.watts.com/pages/_products...d=64&parCat=84
See which kind of PRV you have. Most can handle up to 300 psi so you are likely fine.
If you don't have an expansion tank in the system I'd get one. May eliminate your problem.
Those are also on the same site.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:23 AM   #10
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Groaning pipes


I wish i was you guys for my sprinklers lol and im jealous of what a shower must feel like in your house haha

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