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-   -   Gas Line Extension - Can I use Flexible Pipe? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/gas-line-extension-can-i-use-flexible-pipe-1487/)

MikeinBurien 12-19-2005 01:52 PM

Gas Line Extension - Can I use Flexible Pipe?
 
Hi Everyone - I'm extending an existing natural gas line for a small 20,000 BTU direct vent fireplace. Hookup is easy-breezy and I can run black pipe, but would prefer to avoid the hassles of renting a threading tool and use some sort of flexible line approved for gas.

Is there such a thing? I'm assuming it would be somewhat more expensive than black pipe, but wonder how much?

MikeinBurien

K2eoj 12-19-2005 08:20 PM

They started using some kind of yellow inside gas pipe around here in the last couple of years but I don't know much about it. i did a little job outside of Charlotte NC. and they allowed 1/2 inch soft copper. I've heard the yellow stuff isn't any stronger than copper. I prefer gas pipe that nails, sawzalls, and drills have a tough time getting through. HS>

MikeinBurien 12-20-2005 10:48 AM

Hi HS - I did some research locally and also found out that the yellow gas line is now available and allowed pretty much everywhere in the US. The problem with it is that you need to get certified by the manufacturer before you can purchase and install it. This seems like a significant inconvenience so I plan to stick to black pipe. Just wanted to stay away from doing the custom threading, but found out my local store will cut and thread each piece I need. The only problem with that is making sure each piece is the right length ahead of time. For my particular installation that shouldn't be too difficult since all I need are 4 runs.

Regarding the yellow pipe, the construction is stainless steel mesh coverered with a fairly thick protective vinyl or rubber. Very durable stuff. Sure you can probably still drive a nail through it or chop it somehow, but I would think most people would not be running this stuff inside hidden walls, etc. Seems like very handy stuff and is in heavy use these days.

I did read that one city banned it because the yellow pipe didn't take a lightning strike and caused a house to burn down. Pfft! One house burns down and they ban the stuff without knowing if it was the yellow pipe or not. Wondering how the lightning got to it anyway.:mad:

Our local gas company uses flexible gas line to connect the meter to the main in the street so it can't be all that bad. Looks like tough stuff. No info on costs.

Black Pipe it is!:D

MikeinBurien.

K2eoj 12-20-2005 12:21 PM

Our crew broke a piece of black at the threads one time and it was a very close call. When I remoldel now I'm always on the look out for unsecured pipes etc. When I ran crews it was rare that we would get through a big job without popping a water line, cutting a #6 wire , or something. Twice in my life, the tools are picked up, the owner is writting the check, and the guys are putting a few more nails in, and a nail goes into a water pipe. <P>
I need to check out that yellow a little more. I'm sure it can be bonded to ground or it probably wouldn't be allowed anywhere. HS.<P>
Probably should check to see that your black gas pipe is bonded. I'm not sure of the details but i need to check a couple of my buildings. If I can't find anything aroud here on how to do it maybe one of us could start a new thread.

pranderson 12-20-2005 01:12 PM

I have had several propane lines on my property extended for various projects using flexible lightweight yellow "Poly Pipe". My local propane company supplied the materials and labor. It came on large rolls. They said it was safe and had been in use for several years without problems. I later tried to purchase the same material for another project, but couldn't find anyone that would sell it to me. Propane company said had to be "professionally" installed?
Several of the people I spoke to at local home improvement/hardware stores said they didn't recommend using it anyway---"Didn't trust it." I can't say one way or the other about that; It's been in the ground at my place for about 3 years now without problems. I ended up using a coated iron pipe because I couldn't get the poly pipe.

Good luck.

MinConst 12-20-2005 09:38 PM

Some of these newer products that come out sure seem nice. Easy to install, cheaper on the labor side. But it takes many years of use before I would feel comfortable with them. In running Gas I would recommend Black pipe over anything flexible. The tuffer the better for gas. I can see the utility company using a flexible connection for obvious reasons of possible movement.
You are making the right choice in using black.

cruzn246 12-29-2007 11:10 AM

That is CSST piping
 
The flexible piping you are all talking about is called CSST piping. It is costly, about $3.50/ft, and I can't find it at Home depot or Lowes in anything longer than 6/ft. I have found it online and the smallest roll I can get is 100 ft. That's $350 worth of pipe for a job that requires half of that (50ft). I have found a firm that sells it, but I really don't want to add 250 to my cost when I'm doing it myself.

The blogs I have seen about say it's a contractors favorite because of installation ease/time. My sister had a 30,000 btu heater installed and they ran about 35ft of this stuff to it. They must get a better deal on this stuff than $3.50/ft because I saw her installation/parts charge and that $3.50/ft really didn't show up. I imagine their cast was closer to $2.50/ft.

moneymgmt 12-29-2007 11:41 AM

Flex line is pretty neat stuff. I just had a furnace moved from my main floor to the attic and we ran flex line between the joists to get there. I was told it would meet code up to 100' run. The big gripe I have with it is that its so new there are dozens of companies that make it in competition, and each one sells their "own" compatible fittings.... nothing is universal yet.

Marlin 12-29-2007 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cruzn246 (Post 83653)
The flexible piping you are all talking about is called CSST piping. It is costly, about $3.50/ft, and I can't find it at Home depot or Lowes in anything longer than 6/ft. I have found it online and the smallest roll I can get is 100 ft. That's $350 worth of pipe for a job that requires half of that (50ft). I have found a firm that sells it, but I really don't want to add 250 to my cost when I'm doing it myself.

The blogs I have seen about say it's a contractors favorite because of installation ease/time. My sister had a 30,000 btu heater installed and they ran about 35ft of this stuff to it. They must get a better deal on this stuff than $3.50/ft because I saw her installation/parts charge and that $3.50/ft really didn't show up. I imagine their cast was closer to $2.50/ft.

Why would you resurrect a two year old thread?
Those gas lines you're looking at in Home Depot are to connect dryers and such to hard pipe so they can be pulled out. Gas lines should not be run in them. The reason you can't find the flexible gas line is you need to be certified to purchase/install it. I also do not trust the stuff, use black pipe.

moneymgmt 12-29-2007 11:48 AM

that's hilarious.... didn't even look at the dates!

ranman469 12-29-2007 02:06 PM

the flexible gas pipe is only to be sold through suppliers to a licensed installer. some places will sell anything. but it is done this way so it gets installed right. each type has its own install instructions. all are good and hold up fine but the install instructions must be fallowed.

DarylB 01-07-2008 07:30 PM

You might try looking on ebay for gasFlex flexible gas piping. It's sold in 33' sections with the connections already attached.

DarylB

MikeinBurien 10-17-2009 12:51 AM

Nice! Now that's what I really needed! I moved out of that last house and now have two fireplaces I plan to install gas inserts in. The flex pipe will be really handy to do those install.

Now all I have to do is figure out how to get the new flue liner through the narrow damper! Ugh...:wallbash:

Red Squirrel 10-17-2009 01:00 AM

Now that we're in 2009, I wonder if that new flexy pipe has matured enough yet. :p

redman11 10-19-2009 09:04 PM

Flex Pipe
 
I work for the ultility comapny in New York, and we do not like flex pipe for gas use, but some people use it on appliances like dryers ans stoves. Black pipe would be the best choice, and depends where you are from you may need a licensed plbr to file for a permit. Again it depends what city you live in. Good Luck!


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