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-   -   Gas Line Above Kitchen Cabinets (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/gas-line-above-kitchen-cabinets-170956/)

BPC 02-03-2013 11:42 PM

Gas Line Above Kitchen Cabinets
 
3 Attachment(s)
I'd like to see of anyone has done this before and if this method of routing a gas line has passed inspection.

I recently took down a load bearing wall with the help of an architect friend, to open up the kitchen and in turn made a peninsula out of the existing counter top.

The original cook-top was electric, but I want to install a new gas cook-top in its place. Since I can't notch or drill through the support column I was forced to run the gas line and electrical (in conduit) around the column above the cabinets. Everything is bolted to the wall and seems to be secure, but a neighbor (who is a HVAC guy by trade) came over and acted like this wasn't proper and told me I should drill through the support column, which I don't want to do. The whole thing is hidden by the crown molding on the cabinet.

I haven't gotten any inspections for this project, so I can't just go and ask the inspector what to do. I'm too far into the project now to go and try and pull permits. My architect friend did all the calculations for the beam and wasn't uncomfortable not pulling the permits, but the electrical and plumbing was my deal to work out.

Here is a few pictures to look at. Any advice would be appreciated.

hvac benny 02-04-2013 12:30 AM

How do you know if the gas line is sized properly, or the gas meter and regulator can handle the increased load?

joecaption 02-04-2013 12:36 AM

Please go back and add your location to your profile.
Most areas you would need a permit and a licenced plumber with an added gas licence or the gas company to do that work.
Looks like you did nice neat work just may not be legal.
What's that "support beam" supporting that you were afraid to bore into?
Wall studs get bored out all the time for gas lines.

hammerlane 02-04-2013 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1109082)
Most areas you would need a permit and a licenced plumber with an added gas licence or the gas company to do that work.

With that being said,

There is no special science/tools to threading already threaded black pipe into fittings and being leak-free.

A couple pair of pliers and some elmers glue is all you need. :laughing::laughing:

Of course some common sense is required.

I can't recall of any "accidental" natural gas explosions caused by a homeowner running gas lines.

oh'mike 02-04-2013 06:15 AM

That looks legal from here---except you are missing the steel nail stopping plates as they cross the studs--

Every area is different as far as who can run gas line----home owner can do it in many areas---

Javiles 02-04-2013 07:22 AM

You cant conceal a sediment trap , if that's what i am looking at. and whats in the white pipe in the wall water, drain or vent ?? gas pipe must have a min, six inch clearance around it ei water electrical piping. finally that gas line needs to be bonded. also is that galvanize pipe gas approved not all galvanize pipe is legal to use on gas. just be careful my friend looks likes a good job, but with gas you need to go above and beyond for safety s sake.

paintdrying 02-04-2013 08:31 AM

Looks like nice work to me. Sometimes in a remodel you can not always follow code. I hope 1/2 inch is going to be enough for your new cook top. I never remember putting a drip leg in the wall, but do not see why it would matter.

jagans 02-04-2013 08:37 AM

Pliers to join gas pipe? :eek: There is this company called Rigid....................

BPC 02-04-2013 09:22 AM

You're right, the nail stops aren't installed yet, but I have them.

Yes that is a sediment trap and that was the idea of my neighbor (the licensed HVAC guy) which I wasn't a fan of. I just had an elbow there before. I'm going to remove it. He said to put it there because of the vertical drop.

The pipe and fitting are all black steel, not galvanized.

The pipe is 1/2" and will be tapped into the 1" trunk line at the furnace. How the line runs in this house is that from the meter outside, it runs in 1" pipe with no taps, straight to a 1" tee in the furnace closet, which then splits it off to 1/2" going to water heater and 1/2" going to furnace in the same closet. What I was going to do was install another 1" tee and split this again, so I have a 1" tee feeding the furnace and the cook-top.

The column supports a 20' beam, so that's why I can't drill into it. At least that is what the architect told me. He didn't want any holes made in that column.

There's no way I can get 6" clearance from the conduit. The gas pipe is bonded already and so is the conduit. I couldn't find any reference in the fuel gas code, IRC, or NEC about black pipe touching conduit.

The white pipe is a vent pipe that I has to reroute. It will go next to all of the other pipes secured to the wall. It's 1-1/2" PVC.

ddawg16 02-04-2013 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1109132)
That looks legal from here---except you are missing the steel nail stopping plates as they cross the studs--

Every area is different as far as who can run gas line----home owner can do it in many areas---

Yep....they look like this...

http://www.strongtie.com/graphics/pr.../204a-2013.gif

Quote:

Originally Posted by Javiles (Post 1109152)
You cant conceal a sediment trap , if that's what i am looking at. and whats in the white pipe in the wall water, drain or vent ?? gas pipe must have a min, six inch clearance around it ei water electrical piping. finally that gas line needs to be bonded. also is that galvanize pipe gas approved not all galvanize pipe is legal to use on gas. just be careful my friend looks likes a good job, but with gas you need to go above and beyond for safety s sake.

Couldn't he put an access door under the cabinet?


Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1109197)
Pliers to join gas pipe? :eek: There is this company called Rigid....................

hammerlane does on occasion show a sense of humor.....this was one of them.

For the record....I did all of my own gas pipe....yes, I have permits....but here in California, a homeowner can pretty much do anything he wants....as long as he has the permits....in fact, I don't know of anything we are NOT allowed to do....

Alan 02-04-2013 09:25 AM

Nail stops are not required for steel pipe where i'm at.

:)

hvac benny 02-04-2013 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan
Nail stops are not required for steel pipe where i'm at.

:)

Not in Canada either. They're only required for gas tubing (ie. copper and CSST).

ddawg16 02-04-2013 10:06 AM

See that white PVC pipe? Assuming 1.5" in dia....I'm sure it's closer than 1.5" to the edge....that is what needs nail stop....

Personally, when in doubt...I put on nail stop....

hammerlane 02-04-2013 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1109197)
Pliers to join gas pipe? There is this company called Rigid....................


you question pliers being used to join the black pipe but nothing about the Elmers glue?? You did see the laughing emoticons after that statement. See ddawg16's quote below.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1109223)
hammerlane does on occasion show a sense of humor.....this was one of them.

Good assumption ddawg!

Javiles 02-04-2013 06:24 PM

not to get picky but he's got pressure fittings on that vent, thats why i asked about the white pipe. and for the poster that wondered why you cant conceal a sediment trap, at some point they may need to be cleaned. :wink:


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