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Old 09-10-2013, 07:58 AM   #1
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Garden hose with internal timer


I have a timer outside hooked up to my hose by a hose kink preventer.

I'm thinking of drilling another hole and adding a new outside tap. This time I'll run 3/4 CPVC to a down-step to 1/2 into a CPVC ball valve, itself into a hose connector, into a kink preventer, which then attaches to the timer. The timer connects to another hose connector back into 1/2 inch CPVC, connected to a frost-free sillcock.

That would supply a hose tap outside that's on an internal (non-theftable) timer, going supply to shutoff valve to timer to tap.

Currently when I water my lawn, I go downstairs and shut off the mains. Then I go outside and turn on the timer. I come back inside and turn on the mains partway to supply water to the timer. Seems silly when I could have a timed tap outside and just leave the tap on, turn on the mains and activate the timer inside.

Anyone done this?

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Old 09-10-2013, 09:36 AM   #2
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Garden hose with internal timer


What? Why all this back/forth? Why the kink thing? Why step down from 3/4" to 1/2", that'll just reduce the flow you'd typically need for decent sprinkler operation.

If all you want is an inside timer, then get one that supports using external valves. Then you're just running a low voltage wire from the timer to the valve (or multiple valves). This is how most lawn irrigation setups work.

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Old 09-10-2013, 09:48 AM   #3
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Garden hose with internal timer


The kink thing is there so I can have a little flex when I try to remove the timer from the line.

The actual spigot connector I have in the wall is 1/2 inch, not 3/4 inch. I could run 3/4 to it, but it doesn't actually do anything since I need a 1/2 inch connector to hook it up.

I run back and forth because to turn on the hose outside I wind up in a corner between a wall and the sprinkler, and then have to walk toward the sprinkler--which is currently soaking me--to get out of there. If I want to operate the sprinkler without getting wet, the mains has to be shut off. Hence why I want the timer inside.

The timer has no voltage. It's entirely mechanical.
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:19 AM   #4
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Garden hose with internal timer


I'm with Bill. If you go with an irrigation timer and valves you can set it and forget it. If you don't want to run low voltage lines outside, set up the valves inside then run the pipes outside.
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:21 AM   #5
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Garden hose with internal timer


I'm not sure how this is not "set it and forget it". I decide at point in time X I want the sprinkler on for a few minutes but I am leaving, so I turn the timer on. Then I leave. Isn't that the point of a timer? To set a countdown when the hose is supposed to turn off?
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:11 AM   #6
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Garden hose with internal timer


Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefoxicy View Post
I'm not sure how this is not "set it and forget it". I decide at point in time X I want the sprinkler on for a few minutes but I am leaving, so I turn the timer on. Then I leave. Isn't that the point of a timer? To set a countdown when the hose is supposed to turn off?
If you use an irrigation system timer, you set the day of week, time, and duration to water. Unless you want to alter the schedule, you don't touch it. The water turns on and off at the date/time designated.

Something like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rain-Bird...0#.Ui9ErD80-So
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:18 AM   #7
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Garden hose with internal timer


They make timers that run automatically. Some with just one valve, some with support for many more. The idea is it's better to run the sprinkler regularly at an ideal time rather than hit or miss, and over-water it.

Here's a few ideas:
http://www.costco.com/Rain-Bird-4-zo...100039671.html
http://www.costco.com/Rain-Bird-Gard...100037639.html
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Orbit-1-D...6906/203019979
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Orbit-10-...6905/202783727

The ones that support multiple zones are nice. You can do things like have separate zones that get watered on different days or lengths of time. Or you can run the lawn sprinklers separately to avoid losing too much pressure trying to run more than one at a time. I did this with a 3-zone setup. One zone was the front lawn, another the back lawn and the 3rd was some 1/2" poly feeding drip and mist heads around various shrubs. Worked quite well, wasn't hard to set up and didn't cost all that much (not including all my labor, of course!)
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:59 AM   #8
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Garden hose with internal timer


That doesn't seem useful to me. I just turn the water on when I leave, or when the sun comes up, depending when I'm awake/around. Also if it seems dry. Unless it rained, or is too wet. Some days I take a cultivator to the soil around the tree and garden first to loosen it up; considering adding red wigglers and earth worms into the soil to help with all that.

Though I guess programming a time on would be useful if I could get a good schedule for when kids are walking by on their way to school. There are better ways to do that.

If I have to program in a schedule to work the damn thing, I'm going to spend like ten times as much time messing with it. Hmm, wasn't hot today, lawn is still moist, leave it alone. Was really hot today, better give it 15-30 minutes of watering now that I'm home.

Unless you have a system that analyzes the moisture content of the soil, the temperature, the amount of insolation, looks at the plants to decide if they look droopy and overheated/underwatered, etc. Which ... is going to be way too much to program and be consistently wrong, when I can just glance outside and go, "... yep. More water."

Nothing in this thread has been useful. I'm trying to get a timer inline in the hose plumbing, trying to make sure it's not going to end with stupid stuff like not being able to replace the timer or joints taking stress when turning the timer on or other unpredicted problems that I can either learn from experience (doing it wrong) or ask other people about and avoid. All I'm getting is "You're trying to ride a bicycle and not sure how to use the drop bar end shifters? Why not get a motorcycle? It's got a motor, and goes fast. Get a cruiser because it's more comfortable than the weird supline position that drop bar bike has." Which doesn't really help me figure out how to use the bar end shifters.

For the record: every single person in the world was wrong when I bought a car. I bought a car with a stick shift, because driving the automatic was ridiculous (can make it cruise at a general speed +/-5mph, but not stable and definitely not agile if you want to change your speed... which caused extreme difficulty driving in heavy 70mph near-bumper-to-bumper traffic, since merging into a 2 car length opening is impossible to do safely). This was one of the best decisions of my life. I still can't parallel park an automatic and I've tried for like 7 years... can parallel park a stick, could do it the first month no problem. Yes that means I failed my driver's test and they got tired of seeing me and gave me a license even though I never actually passed.

Stop handing me crap I don't want and can't use. When someone asks "How do I X" don't start explaining "You can Y" instead. Does this happen in water heater threads? "How do I rig up this solar water heater?" people start going on about how a heat pump heater is less complex and still highly efficient and never actually get down to how to plumb the coolant loop for the solar collector into the heater. It's not even the first time I've gotten stupid inane unrelated answers on this board, people just skipping the topic and going "I have a different pet project you should do this completely different thing instead it'll end the same way but with more shiny!"
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:21 PM   #9
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Garden hose with internal timer


"Nothing has been useful". Gee, thanks. And you expect to get further support?

When YOU don't do a better job of describing what YOU are doing and why, then don't be surprised when others try to fill in the blanks. To go off and insult them for trying is just plain rude.

Had YOU explained the silly dance you put yourself through to avoid getting wet then perhaps others would have been able to answer it more effectively. But now that they've seen you're such a rude ingrate I doubt anyone will bother. I'd venture this is not a new phenomenon for you.
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:28 PM   #10
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Garden hose with internal timer


I'll answer his original question. And to avoid any sarcastic remarks, I will refrain from extrapolating on my answer.

No.
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:58 PM   #11
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Garden hose with internal timer


Quote:
Originally Posted by wkearney99 View Post
I'd venture this is not a new phenomenon for you.
It's not a new phenomenon in general. There are entire papers out about how people over-engineer things, many focusing on job applicants trying to handle simple tasks and going about by injecting tons of complicated round-about attempts to completely re-engineer or subvert major components of existing systems. It's constant.

The original post quite clearly involved a timer that shuts off the hose after a specific interval, and then goes about trying to move it inside because of weird accessibility issues:

Quote:
Currently when I water my lawn, I go downstairs and shut off the mains. Then I go outside and turn on the timer. I come back inside and turn on the mains partway to supply water to the timer. Seems silly when I could have a timed tap outside and just leave the tap on, turn on the mains and activate the timer inside.
The responses involved:

  • Suggestions to run 3/4 piping to the sillcock, which itself is 1/2 inch (near as I can tell, every single sillcock sold at Home Depot and Lowes for outdoor garden hose use is an 8-12 inch pipe 1/2 inch in diameter with a 3/4 inch hose connector on the end), without stepping down to 1/2 inch to connect, ostensibly to get better flow
  • Suggestions to use electronic programmable timers and valves to accomplish the goal of having a shut-off timer inside
  • Suggestions to use multi-zone timers when the original context only mentioned one zone (indicating the response is a result of inventing a made-up scenario and engineering a completely new solution, rather than looking at what's being attempted and assuming what it attempts to supply is appropriate to whatever need is being addressed)


So I hear you're putting in a 55 gallon water heater and not sure if a direct solid gas line to the heater itself is right, or if you should hook it up some other way. Why don't you get a dual water heater with 250 gallon tanks? You'd also want to get point of use meters for different tenants so you can charge them for rough gas usage based on proportion of hot water used. That's how it's usually done with mid-size apartment complexes.

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