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Old 03-20-2009, 09:15 AM   #31
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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Don't forget to make sure that whatever sealant you use is rated for gas. You may already know this but I like to err on the side of caution.

No, I was not aware of a gas rated sealant. Which is recommended and how is it applied... on the threads before assemble or on the edges of the fitting after assembly?. Thanks for the tip.

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Old 03-20-2009, 09:19 AM   #32
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


Obviously, I need to close the main gas valve. Do I need to open any lines to allow the remaining gas in the lines to escape for safety purposes?
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Old 03-20-2009, 10:18 AM   #33
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


apply the dope to the male threads.. If you have a gas wh just fire up the wh . the gas win the lined will be used up
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Old 03-20-2009, 01:43 PM   #34
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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Obviously, I need to close the main gas valve. Do I need to open any lines to allow the remaining gas in the lines to escape for safety purposes?

There's usually a tee with a plug at the meter. You can remove the plug there if you'd like.
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Old 03-21-2009, 01:53 PM   #35
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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The more I think about this, the more I think that this is something I can do my self. All that needs to be done is to remove tap line for gas heater, cut this fitting, rethread the pipes, install new threaded fitting, install back the gas heating line, and whalla!!. Obviously this is a gas line and I would need to shut off the main gas valve... is there any safety precautions to be taken into account?. What type of fitting is recommended for this job?

Greg
When you do this job, keep track of your time. Not just on the job time, but trips to the supply house, and trips to the rental yard. How long does it take for each trip under the house and back out? Have you cut & threaded pipe before? Do you know the take out for a fitting? What about the need for pipe hangers. What pilots need to be lit? What if a thermocouple does not work. I obviously have not seen your job, but 2 hours minimum, after getting parts and tools would not be out of line. Add supply trips, an inspection if required and you can easily have 4 to 5 hours on this job. And you do not have the costs of liablity insurance, performance bond, licenses, education, tool maintanence, estimate time, collection time to figure in on your job.

When you are done, please give us a report on your job. Especially, let us know how the gas leak test came out.
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Old 03-21-2009, 08:44 PM   #36
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


I havent been on this site in a few days and was just checking this particular thread out.

Someone said something about using a union and if your local gas authority will allow it then by all means go for it. Here we are only allowed to use unions at the appliance being served. Something that we can use are flanges though. Personally I like flanges much more for inline repairs than unions, but as I said, if allowed then go for it.
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Old 03-23-2009, 09:40 AM   #37
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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When you do this job, keep track of your time. Not just on the job time, but trips to the supply house, and trips to the rental yard. How long does it take for each trip under the house and back out? Have you cut & threaded pipe before? Do you know the take out for a fitting? What about the need for pipe hangers. What pilots need to be lit? What if a thermocouple does not work. I obviously have not seen your job, but 2 hours minimum, after getting parts and tools would not be out of line. Add supply trips, an inspection if required and you can easily have 4 to 5 hours on this job. And you do not have the costs of liablity insurance, performance bond, licenses, education, tool maintanence, estimate time, collection time to figure in on your job.

When you are done, please give us a report on your job. Especially, let us know how the gas leak test came out.

I have been having second thoughts on my previous comments about doing this myself. Is not as simple as I originally thought. After reading your input, I have actually changed my mind about it. I guess there is a lot of safety factors and not exactly the place to get cheap. I will have it done by a license plumber.

Thank you
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Old 03-23-2009, 10:41 AM   #38
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


You have made a wise decision. Your insurance (or the licensed contractors) will now cover a fire caused by a leak. This is not true if you do the work yourself.
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Old 03-23-2009, 11:45 AM   #39
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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You have made a wise decision. Your insurance (or the licensed contractors) will now cover a fire caused by a leak. This is not true if you do the work yourself.
I was not aware of this "insurance coverage" from a license contractor.

Thank you all
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Old 03-23-2009, 01:00 PM   #40
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


A licensed contractor is responsible for all work done, and any problems caused by his work. This is why they are required to be bonded and insured.
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Old 03-23-2009, 01:07 PM   #41
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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A licensed contractor is responsible for all work done, and any problems caused by his work. This is why they are required to be bonded and insured.

It seems like most licenses are limited to about $12,000. Is that the minimum for most contractors or depending on the trade?
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Old 03-23-2009, 01:42 PM   #42
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


Hard to say. Basically the same as auto insurance. How much can you afford to pay out of pocket, if sued? Some States require a set amount of contractors insurance coverage. Unlikely $12,000 would cover a home burnt down from a bad connection. Insurance is one thing a customer does not understand when a contractor gives a bid, or does a job. It is all a part of doing business. Same a tools needed to do the job.
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Old 03-23-2009, 02:55 PM   #43
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


most in my area carry 1 million at min
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Old 03-23-2009, 08:06 PM   #44
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A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?


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A licensed contractor is responsible for all work done, and any problems caused by his work. This is why they are required to be bonded and insured.
You certainly should ask for proof of licenseure, proof of liability insurance, and proof of a performance bond. If the work is to be done or if there will be an employee on the job, ask for proof of worker's comp. Not only should you get the information, you should also be told how to verify the different coverages. My estimates include the above information, as there are those who claim licensure and insurances. If the person is hesitant about giving you that information, DO NOT hire them. In Oregon, if you hire a non-licensed contractor and have a problem, tough. the Contractors Board will not help you.

Go here to find out licensing rules in your state,
http://www.contractors-license.org/

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