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-   -   A "G Coupling" installed in gas line? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/g-coupling-installed-gas-line-39846/)

gante 03-07-2009 03:10 PM

A "G Coupling" installed in gas line?
 
Hi all,

On the house I am about to purchase the house inspector tells me that there is a "G coupling" on the gas line for the force air heating unit. I don't know what a G coupling is, does anyone have any pictures?. Is this something a DIYer can handle or better left to a licensed plumber?. What would be the proper fitting required to replace this "G coupling"?

Greg

Plumber101 03-07-2009 06:47 PM

Been plumbing and a gas fitter for years. Have never heard of G coupling. Hopefully someone else will chime in soon.

I'd call you inspection company and have them email you a pic and post it here. Some home inspectors are not always on the ball with terminology.

How long has he/she been inspection?
How many inspection has he/she done?
Who certified this person as an inspector?

JDC 03-07-2009 08:15 PM

"G Coupling"? I'm with 101 on this one. I've never heard of a g coupling. Perhaps its a union and the inspector didnt know the correct terminology?

Take a picture of this "G Coupling" and let us see it....it might be enlightening for all of us.

Plumber101 03-07-2009 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDC (Post 241620)
"G Coupling"? I'm with 101 on this one. I've never heard of a g coupling. Perhaps its a union and the inspector didnt know the correct terminology?

Take a picture of this "G Coupling" and let us see it....it might be enlightening for all of us.


This ol' dog would like to learn a new trick....please!

Termite 03-08-2009 12:26 AM

2 Attachment(s)
I've never heard the term G coupling either.

One thing that it very possibly could be:
When plumbers buy threaded lengths of pipe it often comes with thread protectors on the ends that some plumbers errantly use as coupings. These thread protectors are essentially the next size larger pipe with threads ran straight through it. These threads are not tapered (NPT) threads, they're running threads. The pipes have tapered threads, and although they'll thread onto a pipe they do not make much contact because only a couple of the threads interlock.
Honestly they've been used for decades by plumbers that don't know any better, but it doesn't meet code. I still find them on a regular basis in new work, and they get turned down.

Here's a picture of one in my house...The idiot that plumbed it used several of them. None of them leak (I checked).

The second picture is what a correct NPT tapered thread gas coupling looks like.

In my several years as an inspector, I have only seen one thread protector that had NPT threads. One, and I think it was an anomoly.

Just Bill 03-08-2009 07:22 AM

Galvanized coupling??? Not supposed to be galvanized in a gas line.

Termite 03-08-2009 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 241733)
Galvanized coupling??? Not supposed to be galvanized in a gas line.

Not necessarily commonplace, but certainly not prohibited by code.

majakdragon 03-08-2009 11:36 AM

Normally, galvanized is not used for gas lines. The coating can, and will, flake off and block orfices. When I moved to Florida, from Ohio, I was amazed to see complete gas lines run in galvanized. Many people mistake electrical couplings for pipe couplings. As stated by KCtermite, these couplings are straight threaded and not tapered like pipe couplings are.

gante 03-08-2009 11:44 AM

Thanks for all your replies. I will be getting some pictures of these "G Coupling" if I can find it under the house. The inspector report only refers to this coupling as a "G Coupling" and nothing else. I am under the impression might be a T connection on the gas line that was used to tap on of the lines to feed the heating unit. I just don't want to get a plumber and get ripped off for something that should be simple and unexpensive.

Plumber101 03-08-2009 06:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gante (Post 241799)
Thanks for all your replies. I will be getting some pictures of these "G Coupling" if I can find it under the house. The inspector report only refers to this coupling as a "G Coupling" and nothing else. I am under the impression might be a T connection on the gas line that was used to tap on of the lines to feed the heating unit. I just don't want to get a plumber and get ripped off for something that should be simple and unexpensive.


Please keep in mind the most of the fellas here giving FREE advise on their off time are Licensed plumber/gas fitter.
Sometimes a licensed plumber is best due to the issue of working with gas.
Yes we can give you advice on the how's and when's but when working I advise calling a licensed gas fitter. It is always wise to be educated when the plumber shows up but when done wrong and I bet I might see the smoke column from here.

Just my $.02

gante 03-08-2009 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plumber101 (Post 241917)
Please keep in mind the most of the fellas here giving FREE advise on their off time are Licensed plumber/gas fitter.
Sometimes a licensed plumber is best due to the issue of working with gas.
Yes we can give you advice on the how's and when's but when working I advise calling a licensed gas fitter. It is always wise to be educated when the plumber shows up but when done wrong and I bet I might see the smoke column from here.

Just my $.02


Yes, I totally agree with you on this. I would like to take pictures as soon as I can (most likely by the end of the week) and get advices from you guys. I really was not planning to get it done my self unless there would be unanimus agreement that this is something that any DYIer could do. Also, I would like to educate so that I do not get taken advantage of by a unethical plumber.
Some have mentioned "licensed fitter", are not all licensed plumbers licensed fitters?. Is this licensed fitter a special skill for a plumber?

Plumber101 03-08-2009 08:57 PM

Depending on where you are at there may be a separate license for plumber and gas fitter. Most of the time they are together.

I am in KS it is plumber with gas..sounds rude but it is what it is.

Just ask whom you call..if you think they are BSing you then call the local code dept and ask about their license.

After seeing the pics in the thread (Not yours) I would bet that it is no more than a galv coupling. With only one in the system I would want it replaced but, with only one fitting I wouldn't worry to much. As far as code you can use galv for gas line. I know a lot of guys that still use the galv piping but most have switched to black pipe. If the inspector give you a big toot over it have him provide the section in the code that says it can not be used. He won't be able to.

gante 03-12-2009 10:13 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Ok, here is the picture ( I think). I went under the house and found this coupling which I think might be the one the inspector was refering to as "G coupling". I see there is no threads on the coupling, that may be why he recommended to change it. What do you think?. I have a plumber coming this saturday to give me an estimate on replacing it. What do you think should be a fair cost for this job?. I hate to get ripped off.

I have never been under nobody's house but I was not too impressed with the plumbing under the house. Although the plumbing has been updated with cooper there is lines going in different directions, specially by the area where the two bathrooms are located.

majakdragon 03-12-2009 11:09 AM

On the large piping, are those nuts on each end of the fitting? It basically looks like a large compression fitting with a threaded tee connector. At first I thought it looked like a cast iron tee, but then each end looks like nuts that have corrosion built up on them. Not showing any threads on the pipe also makes me think it is a compression fitting.

gante 03-12-2009 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majakdragon (Post 243684)
On the large piping, are those nuts on each end of the fitting? It basically looks like a large compression fitting with a threaded tee connector. At first I thought it looked like a cast iron tee, but then each end looks like nuts that have corrosion built up on them. Not showing any threads on the pipe also makes me think it is a compression fitting.

Yes, I do not what to say. I am inclined to believe that this indeed may be a compression fitting, but then again you see some nuts on each side with what you call "corrosion built up"... it looks quite uniform and large to be corrosion. It may be some type of seal or something.


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