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Old 08-15-2010, 07:49 AM   #1
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Freezing pipes


I am rerouting the supply for my washer. Going to come out CBS wall, bury pipe in trench and come back up and into wall at new location. Our winters get as low as teens. How to best avoid frozen pipe above ground? Home Depot recommended using the foam insulation wrap they sell. I thought about enclosing the pipes in a larger diameter PVC above ground and filling it with Great Stuff (foam spray insulation) Is this overkill? My only other option is to run pipes inside along wall through the bedroom and somehow cover them with a hugh piece of cove base.

Any thoughts??

J

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Old 08-15-2010, 10:31 AM   #2
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Freezing pipes


wind is generally what freezes pipes, thats why foam insulation works so well. Insulate the pipes, the wall the pipes are in, and use expanding foam on any cracks/openings in the siding that you can find. Get lots of insulation in the walls, I've seen P traps on laundry boxes freeze because the dryer exhaust vent was right next to the trap

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Old 08-16-2010, 07:37 AM   #3
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Freezing pipes


Run the pipes inside the house any way you can and box them in somehow ..

If you run them outside in the weather you describe you will have nothing but trouble.. Just looking ahead.
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Old 08-16-2010, 07:42 AM   #4
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Freezing pipes


There should be no insulation other than pipe wrap between a pipe and interior heated space. Batts may be laid completely behind the pipe as seen from the inside prior to sheetrocking, or may have a triangular wedge as wide in front as the pipe is deep (in the wall) cut in the portion in front of the pipe. Do not use fill such as vermiculite or cellulose that will fall in front of the pipe.

Inside a larger PVC pipe on the ground surface outside, with or without foam filling, is not good enough.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 08-16-2010 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:12 AM   #5
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Freezing pipes


Ok first you have to measure the outside diameter of your exposed pipe. Then go to your home improvement store and purchase foam pipe insulation that matches the size of your pipe. (This is the foam that is split down the center and allows the user to slip it over pipes). Now wrap your exposed pipe in the foam pipe insulation and youíre done. Another solution would be to wrap heat tape around your pipe especially if itís prone to freezing. Make sure you plug the tape into an approved electrical socket if your going to use this method.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:49 AM   #6
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Freezing pipes


Heat tape is great, but I would not use it in a non accessible space, like a wall cavity. It can break down in not so many years, get brittle, and be a fire hazard waiting to happen. Insulate them well, or just run your pipes on the inside and build a cover to hide them. I've seen some ingenious covers made with molding and 1x boards with the piping hidden underneath.
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Old 08-16-2010, 09:21 AM   #7
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Freezing pipes


Quote:
Originally Posted by the_man View Post
Heat tape is great, but I would not use it in a non accessible space, like a wall cavity. It can break down in not so many years, get brittle, and be a fire hazard waiting to happen.
Youíre correct on that. Heat tape should only be used in an accessible open area never install heat tape in walls, floors and ceilings. And if you must use an extension cord to plug in your heat tape be sure it is of proper size. Also note, the life expectancy of heat tape is between 3-5 years and when it goes it goes. There is no fixing it, just replace it.

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