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-   -   Flexible yellow gas piping (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/flexible-yellow-gas-piping-122150/)

fbarber 11-02-2011 09:46 AM

What are the limitations on the use of flexible yellow gas piping? Can it be concealed above hung ceilings or in soffits? If so what code required protection against penetration by a nail or screw?

autx790 11-02-2011 10:48 AM

The limitation is the yellow piping it's self. It is easily punctured and also prone to fires. I'd avoid using flex pipe if you can.

autx790 11-02-2011 10:48 AM

The limitation is the yellow piping its self. It is easily punctured and also prone to fires. I'd avoid using flex pipe if you can.

Sorry, double posted

hvac benny 11-02-2011 07:18 PM

Flex pipe can be concealed in hung ceilings or soffits. As for penetrations, just like copper, it must be 1.75" from the wall or ceiling surface, otherwise a strike plate must be used where that depth cannot be achieved. As for it being "prone to fires", just be sure that it is bonded to ground. This was the issue from a few years ago: some houses were hit by lighting and the flex pipe melted due to it absorbing all of the electrical energy; fires ensued. Bonding, as all metallic gas piping should be, eliminates this threat.

autx790 11-03-2011 07:17 AM

I know the manufacturer is attributing the fires to improper bonding, but if that was the case they wouldn't be modifying the materials they use and supply houses wouldn't be pulling it from their shelves. Even when bonded as a gas line should be, it still has faults and is the cause of fires.

hvac benny 11-03-2011 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by autx790 (Post 762844)
I know the manufacturer is attributing the fires to improper bonding, but if that was the case they wouldn't be modifying the materials they use and supply houses wouldn't be pulling it from their shelves. Even when bonded as a gas line should be, it still has faults and is the cause of fires.

Care to back any of this up with a link, source or at least some sort of cognizant rationale behind your assertion that flex pipe "is the cause of fires"?

amakarevic 11-03-2011 11:29 AM

what is the maximum length flex pipe can run? my stove is about 6-7" away from where i'd like to stop running black pipe (complicated to explain but tight areas and too much demolition and reengineering would be involved in breaking way for stiff pipe). am i safe to go with yellow flex pipe?

hvac benny 11-03-2011 07:41 PM

Flex pipe, like all gas pipe, must be sized according to it's pressure, longest run, and load. Probably best to get a pro to do this for you.

fbarber 11-05-2011 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvac benny
Flex pipe, like all gas pipe, must be sized according to it's pressure, longest run, and load. Probably best to get a pro to do this for you.

Thanks for the responses. All are helpful.

fbarber 11-05-2011 08:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by autx790
The limitation is the yellow piping it's self. It is easily punctured and also prone to fires. I'd avoid using flex pipe if you can.

Thanks for the responses. All are helpful.

CamarosRus 02-24-2013 09:46 PM

I have a install in my shop where this yellow flex was apparently run from te house through PVC pipe to shop.
Upon exiting the PVC at the stud wall treated plate the yellow fle goes up vertical stud wall and runs horizontal
amongst attic trusses toward upstairs rear furnace closet.

In the middle of this horz truss run the yellow line is TEE'd with a brass fitting. I cant (yet) see close up to brass tee
but off bottom of tee is black iron pipe going down through sheetrock ceiling and ultimately supplying hung
REZNOR unit heater.

I now want to Tee again and supply a water heater which would be down at slab level (13' ceiling)

How can I make arrangements to purchase and run more of this yellow hose in between vertical studs down to where a
new water heater will be placed ??? OR will you suugest/insist that I use hard blk iron pipe to supply
the water heater???

Thanks Chuck
Auburn, WA

TheEplumber 02-24-2013 09:55 PM

Sounds like Tracpipe or similar product. You need special tools and certification to work with it.
You would also need to do sizing calcs to confirm the existing line is sized properly to handle the additional load

joecaption 02-24-2013 09:57 PM

Camaro, go back and add your own post not just add onto someone elses.
To confusing.

CamarosRus 02-24-2013 10:07 PM

Maybe I'll contact the Gas Utilty company or water heater vendor.


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