Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-15-2008, 05:14 PM   #1
Florida Cracker
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 52
Share |
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


UPDATE: Here are some new photos. It seems like the top maybe 1/2" of the pipe is leaded, kind of where you can see the wax ring build up. I could scratch this part with my chisel and reveal a shiny surface so I'm pretty positive its lead.
So, am I correct that the leaded portion is just the very top and a twist and set flange will be able to seal against the pipe walls?

See the last post for more photos hopefully. It won't let me attach more than one for some reason.
Thanks for all the help.

Hello Gentlemen.
I just installed a slate floor as you can see here. (I also replaced joists, subfloor, rotted wood, laminate, someone's repair using roofing shingles around the toilet, etc. in this bathroom.)
I have a wood frame two story 1920s project house in Florida.
The tiles are 12x12 for reference. Ignore the mortar around the pipe.
My question is, I was going to use a 4" pvc twist and set flange.
Do I have any other, better options?
I don't know if the photo shows it, but the pipe is flared around the lip, and the flared part is fairly thin-walled.
The main waste pipes in the house are cast iron.
I wish I had pictures of a previous repair I performed downstairs on the 4" cast iron drain-there was flooding from the wall, a 6" plus hole in the cast iron, and roots and tampons in the pipe-it was great fun, you guys would have loved it.


Last edited by Jack A. Trades; 02-18-2008 at 04:46 PM. Reason: Updating
Jack A. Trades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 11:57 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,670
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Not sure I can be of much help since I can't actually "see" the pipe. Since you said "thin walled" I am assuming the "pipe" is a lead bend. Used in the early days of plumbing, the lead was peened over the edge to seal it. Not sure if the Twist and set flange will seal since the lead (if that is what it is) is probably not a "true" round. Just a thought.

__________________
If you have never made a mistake, you haven't done much.
majakdragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 02:51 PM   #3
Florida Cracker
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 52
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


I know the photo sucks. I didn't want to walk on the tile, so I couldn't get a good photo.
Its a cast iron pipe that had a metal flange on top of it that was screwed to what was left of the subfloor.
I removed the metal flange (I can't recall if it was connected to the pipe with a wax ring or what) because it was so rusted out.
I'd get a better picture, but I need to wait until the sealer dries.
Thanks.
Jack A. Trades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 04:20 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 650
Send a message via AIM to Marlin
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


By early days of plumbing do you mean last week? I've installed about a dozen of them in the past year. The lead is streched over the brass flange and soldered to it.

Clean that pipe up well and look at it. Chances are it's pretty shot. Those expandable repair flanges are against code and do fail. Do you have access underneath? I'd recommend cutting out the cast iron and re-piping with PVC.
If you don't have access how high is the cast iron? If it's level with your floor or within 1/4 in of it you can chip out the tile/morter around the pipe and use a cast iron compression flange. Or more reliable but more difficult would be to pour a lead joint.
Marlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2008, 06:23 PM   #5
Master Plumber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 169
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Jack A. Trades you may have got the cart in front of the horse on this one.
jpplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 04:47 AM   #6
Florida Cracker
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 52
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Well, I was thinking that the new flange needs to sit on top of the tile, so I put the tile down first.
Jack A. Trades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 04:52 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 650
Send a message via AIM to Marlin
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack A. Trades View Post
Well, I was thinking that the new flange needs to sit on top of the tile, so I put the tile down first.
Just the lip. Not the whole flange.
Marlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 07:02 AM   #8
Master Plumber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 169
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


The flange does rest on top of the tile but needs to be connected to the pipe and from what you described it sounds more like you have a lead bend but I can't tell from the picture. I have used twist and set flanges on lead bend in concrete as long as the lead isn't distorted to prevent a seal. If you can get underneath to the plumbing it would be best to redo it. If it IS cast iron there is a flange that slips on the pipe (inside and outside) and clamps down by tightening bolts on the flange so you would need more clearance around the pipe then you now have.
Looking at the pic again it appears to be lead in coloring and does not come up to the finished floor as it should, or if it is lead it should be above the floor so it can be formed and soldered over the ring.

Last edited by jpplumber; 02-17-2008 at 07:06 AM.
jpplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 01:26 PM   #9
Florida Cracker
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 52
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Well, I was planning on installing one of these with the upper flange portion sitting on top of the tile.
Any problems with that?
As far as a lead bend-I don't know what those are-never seen one. This pipe just comes and at floor level a small lip flares out. The edges of the flare out appear very thin and the circumference doesn't appear to be perfectly round by any means.
The pipe is not accessible from beneath because I do not want to remove a finished wood ceiling I installed a few months ago.

Last edited by Jack A. Trades; 02-17-2008 at 01:33 PM.
Jack A. Trades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 02:12 PM   #10
Master Plumber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 169
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Quote:
The edges of the flare out appear very thin and the circumference doesn't appear to be perfectly round by any means.
From this description it sounds like lead and I wouldn't recommend using the flange you are illustrating as it needs to compress inside a solid round pipe and the lead being flexible will only push outwards as you try to turn it in the pipe, that is if it even fits.
jpplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 03:16 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


jpplumber - you said 'that is if it even fits.' What if the lead is a bit oblong? Does it need to be removed and reinstalled? The compression flange I have does not fit easily into the top portion of the lead bend....
jwb1978 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 04:03 PM   #12
Florida Cracker
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 52
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


How far down does the lead portion typically extend?
I was thinking (maybe erroneously) that the bottom rubber part of the twist and set flange would extend about 2" below the lip of the pipe, and would be able to compress against the wall of the pipe rather than the leaded portion.
I don't know if this is fact or just a ...wait for it...pipe dream.
Jack A. Trades is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 10:17 PM   #13
Master Plumber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 169
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Look inside the pipe, occasionally you may see the cast iron below that the lead is attached to if the lead is not formed into a 90 but normally the lead tube has a 90 deg. bend and may go another 12" or so after the bend (on the horizontal) before it goes into the hub of a cast iron tee.
jpplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2008, 10:21 PM   #14
Master Plumber
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 169
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


Quote:
jpplumber - you said 'that is if it even fits.' What if the lead is a bit oblong? Does it need to be removed and reinstalled? The compression flange I have does not fit easily into the top portion of the lead bend....
I don't know any other way to do it right but to remove it and install a new pvc bend and flange unless you have enough lead sticking up above the floor to form and solder to a brass ring
jpplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2008, 04:45 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 650
Send a message via AIM to Marlin
Default

Flange type (photo) slate


The lead typically extends down anywhere from a few inches to a foot and a half. At that point it turns and extends another few inches to a foot and then their is a brass ferrel. That brass is where you would attach a no hub clamp and transition to PVC.
I agree with jpplumber. Their really isn't anything that can be done without enough lead sticking up. Does the lead come up flush with the tile at least? That may be just enough to install a flange, you would need a professional plumber though. You're also running a risk of a leak as that lead bend looks pretty old.
I don't think you ever confirmed for us that it is lead though?


Last edited by Marlin; 02-18-2008 at 04:47 AM.
Marlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plasma TV over Slate jrcrum Home Theater 8 12-16-2009 04:59 PM
Best type of PVC flange? helpless handyman Plumbing 3 11-20-2006 02:25 PM
Advice and help on slate floors adamsela Flooring 1 10-04-2006 04:23 PM
closet flange wax ring problem elkmo Plumbing 2 01-14-2006 02:30 PM
Flange Help Needed tajones44 Plumbing 2 07-11-2005 04:42 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.