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-   -   end caps on copper tubing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/end-caps-copper-tubing-37922/)

nolankyle 02-08-2009 09:39 PM

end caps on copper tubing
 
I am remodeling my bathroom. A plumber capped off the copper feed lines. I am trying to finish the job myself. How do I remove the caps?

stubborn1 02-08-2009 09:47 PM

The easiest way to deal with this is leave the caps in place and cut the tubing just behind the cap with a tubing cutter. Solder your new valve in place and you are set.

You could remove the cap, but it's not worth the time or effort.

Termite 02-08-2009 09:49 PM

Normally you'd cut them off with a tubing cutter. Then clean the pipe with emery cloth and solder on the valves or use compression valves.
You'll definately need to turn off the water supply before doing this.

Ron6519 02-09-2009 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolankyle (Post 227388)
I am remodeling my bathroom. A plumber capped off the copper feed lines. I am trying to finish the job myself. How do I remove the caps?

If this is a bump in your remodeling road, you had better be sure what you're doing once you cut the caps off. As stated before, you need to turn off the water to the whole house to do this. If you don't do it correctly, you can't turn the water back on.
Ron

bradnailer 02-09-2009 04:27 PM

If you have room, cut off the caps with a tubing cutter then rather than soldering on a new valve, solder on a threaded adapter, then screw the valve on to the threaded adapter.

shadow0000 02-12-2009 06:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stubborn1 (Post 227393)
The easiest way to deal with this is leave the caps in place and cut the tubing just behind the cap with a tubing cutter. Solder your new valve in place and you are set.

You could remove the cap, but it's not worth the time or effort.

I agree with you man, but i think there's a one way to removed the cap of tube... But i am not for that way to removed the cap..maybe try to find an answer in copper sink manufacturer what is the easy way to remove the caps on copper tube!!!



__________________
Copper Sinks

bwalley 02-12-2009 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolankyle (Post 227388)
I am remodeling my bathroom. A plumber capped off the copper feed lines. I am trying to finish the job myself. How do I remove the caps?

Since you don't know the basics of plumbing why would you attempt to remodel your bathroom?

Chemist1961 02-12-2009 07:16 AM

You should not only turn off the water but try to drain any presure in your line by opening the lowest tap in the house after the main lines are shut off.
IF you really need to reuse the joints, reheat them and GENTLY grip the caps after they are heated with a set of vise grips and give them a turn. You will know they are heated when the solder at the joint liquifies.
It is often better to start with a fresh cut clean joint.

buletbob 02-12-2009 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolankyle (Post 227388)
I am remodeling my bathroom. A plumber capped off the copper feed lines. I am trying to finish the job myself. How do I remove the caps?

if your going to use the soldered type of shut offs make sure you break them down, you don't want to expose the washer assembly to the extreme heat. once cooled reinstall them . BOB

Termite 02-12-2009 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bwalley (Post 229074)
Since you don't know the basics of plumbing why would you attempt to remodel your bathroom?

This is a DIY site, and a lot of our visitors and members don't know the basics of plumbing or other trades. Yes, there's a lot to learn but lots of people learn it by doing it. No reason to make discouraging statements or questions.

bradnailer 02-12-2009 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 229089)
if your going to use the soldered type of shut offs make sure you break them down, you don't want to expose the washer assembly to the extreme heat. once cooled reinstall them . BOB

That's one of the reasons I suggested sweating on a threaded adapter rather than sweating on a valve directly.

If you don't have room to cut the cap, then after you shut off the water and before you try to heat and remove the cap, drill a hole in the lower face of the cap to relieve the pressure and drain any water that might be in the line. A line free of water is much easier to sweat.

buletbob 02-12-2009 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradnailer (Post 229153)
That's one of the reasons I suggested sweating on a threaded adapter rather than sweating on a valve directly.

If you don't have room to cut the cap, then after you shut off the water and before you try to heat and remove the cap, drill a hole in the lower face of the cap to relieve the pressure and drain any water that might be in the line. A line free of water is much easier to sweat.

:huh: I didn't see that mentioned in your post. Thats why I brought it to the posters attention, My preference is if your going to sweat a fitting ! you might as well sweat the shut off on and not worry about possible leaks.

bradnailer 02-12-2009 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buletbob (Post 229194)
:huh: I didn't see that mentioned in your post. Thats why I brought it to the posters attention, My preference is if your going to sweat a fitting ! you might as well sweat the shut off on and not worry about possible leaks.

Out where I live, the water is sort of nasty and shut off valves only last a few years. With the threaded adapter, it's a lot easier to swap out the valves. Other reason for my suggestion of using a threaded adapter.

Either way is OK though.

skymaster 02-12-2009 01:23 PM

quarter turn ball valves last a very very long time :}:}. Both compression and sweat are made

bradnailer 02-12-2009 04:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skymaster (Post 229259)
quarter turn ball valves last a very very long time :}:}. Both compression and sweat are made

I just installed a couple of those about a month ago. We'll see how they last. I have trouble with the old valves leaking around the stem due to corrosion.


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