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-   -   electrical main panel and copper pipe (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/electrical-main-panel-copper-pipe-34613/)

amakarevic 12-29-2008 10:25 AM

electrical main panel and copper pipe
 
i was wondering if there is any code regulations related to the vicinity of an electrical main panel and copper water supply pipe ? i ran my pipe to go just a few inches away from the panel.

majakdragon 12-29-2008 11:50 AM

None that I am aware of. The box should protect the inside from any water entering. I always avoid the situation, if possible, but have also been within a few inches in some cases.

Termite 12-29-2008 02:28 PM

No plumbing, gas, or HVAC can be located immediately above the panel, because that is dedicated space. You can't have pipes protruding in a 30" wide by 36" deep space in front of the panel, because that is the reqiured clear working space for the panel. Other than that, there is no proximity requirement for plumbing to electrical.

amakarevic 12-29-2008 02:43 PM

i'll try to take a picture tonight and post it. thanks !

Termite 12-29-2008 03:37 PM

Good idea. I'll let you know if what you have is code-compliant or not. :thumbsup:

amakarevic 01-01-2009 09:49 PM

2 Attachment(s)
here we go, boss. the fat pipe is for radiators (1.5"), the skinny one is h20 supply (3/4).

Termite 01-01-2009 11:16 PM

The fat pipe is a problem because it encroaches into the clear space required floor to ceiling in front of the panel. By code, it cannot be there, and as an inspector I'd turn it down if it is newly installed. The clear space is 30" wide, 36" deep in front of the panel, measured from the front of the panel. Imagine a 30"x36" phone booth as tall as the ceiling with its 30" face resting against the face of the panel...That space can't have anything else in it, including that stud wall.

If the other pipes are directly under the panel, they're not encroaching into the required clear space and are not a problem. Looks like they're hugging the wall aren't they?

There's some spooky-looking wiring around that panel. ;-)

jamiedolan 01-02-2009 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 205517)
here we go, boss. the fat pipe is for radiators (1.5"), the skinny one is h20 supply (3/4).

HI

Whats your plan with that wall your building? It looks like you have a lot of slack in most of the cables. I am thinking you might be able to build the wall closer to the brick and install the panel in the new finished wall. But you still have to maintain the clearance in front of the panel, so depending on what you plan to use the finished space for it may or may not work.

Jamie

amakarevic 01-02-2009 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamiedolan (Post 205570)
Whats your plan with that wall your building?

yes, i am planning to move the panel to the wall that will hang on the framing that is visible here, however, for that i need an electrical permit to do. that is why there is so much slack.

amakarevic 01-02-2009 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 205557)
The fat pipe is a problem because it encroaches into the clear space required floor to ceiling in front of the panel.

i was planning to raise that fat pipe a few inches above but i am also planning to move the panel forward, for which i will need an electrical permit. i am scared to ask for it because i have completely renovated the place without any permits, including dropping the floor 8 inches and completely revamping the entire plumbing and electrical infrastructure.

joed 01-02-2009 12:24 PM

Fat pipe can go behind the panel but in front or above the panel.

jamiedolan 01-02-2009 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amakarevic (Post 205713)
i was planning to raise that fat pipe a few inches above but i am also planning to move the panel forward, for which i will need an electrical permit. i am scared to ask for it because i have completely renovated the place without any permits, including dropping the floor 8 inches and completely revamping the entire plumbing and electrical infrastructure.

I'd start over with a new panel in the wall.

I'd consider getting an electrician over there any allowing them to deal with the permit issues. If your in a larger city the electrical inspector may be different than the building / plumbing inspector.

Jamie

Termite 01-02-2009 08:59 PM

You mean all this time we've been helping you you've been working without permits? Shame!!! Bad bad bad!!! :laughing::no:

Honestly, the inspector probably has no idea what the inside of your house looks like, or what it looked like before you made updates. If you haven't lived there for the last 10 or 15 years, you can always say that the previous owner did the work. Most cities are interested in the current permitted scope of work, and unless something just screams "done without a permit" they won't take interest (there are exceptions to that of course in some cities).

chris75 01-02-2009 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 205557)

If the other pipes are directly under the panel, they're not encroaching into the required clear space and are not a problem.

They certainly are a problem, check out 110.26(F)(1)(a)

The Fat pipe, little pipe and the wall need to go, or the panel relocated.


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