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Old 01-12-2009, 10:58 AM   #1
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ejector pump venting


I have a new home with an indoor grinder pump and I have been getting sever odors on occasion from the basement. The builder did not vent into our upstairs vents, he vented right back into our drain discharge. Is this against code or just a matter of best practice? Do you feel this is the reason we are experiencing odors? We checked with the neighbors and they are all vented through the upstairs vents, we feel ours was a mistake. Thanks for your help!!!


Last edited by Termite; 01-12-2009 at 11:18 AM. Reason: started new thread
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Old 01-12-2009, 11:24 AM   #2
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ejector pump venting


Your pump's crock should be vented properly to a vent that goes up through your roof. Wet venting isn't good enough as far as I know, let alone tying into drain pipes that aren't intended as vents. I'm not sure what the source of the odors could be unless the pump is sucking a trap dry somehow...Looking for air to vent itself.

If the house is new you need to call your builder. Also see if you can find the manufacturer's venting instructions online.

If piped venting is impossible at this stage, you might be able to get away with an air admittance vent, but I'm not certain if the pump manufacturer allows them.

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Old 01-12-2009, 11:46 AM   #3
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ejector pump venting


Thank you for the reply! I apprecaite your help!!!!

I contacted the builder and he defered me back to the plumber who is claiming that venting back into our plumbing discharge is just as good as tying into the vents upstairs. I am trying to argue that but I do not know enough to put forth a logical argument (and I am looking for some sort of documentation to support my case). I will contact the manufacturer to see what they have to say, review their venting specs and to discuss your alternate solution.

I do know from one of the contractors that was at our house that this was in fact a mistake and not the planned venting solution.

Thanks again!
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Old 01-12-2009, 01:23 PM   #4
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ejector pump venting


That plumber is full of it. He's doing what's called "wet venting". That involves using a pipe that drains water/effluent as a drain and a vent. Your drain pipes are never full of water...The water drains down them in a cylindrical cross section, leaving room for air. Wet venting is ok under certian circumstances for venting basic household plumbing fixtures.

The problem with wet venting the ejector crock is that it is a powered discharge of water, not a gravity drain. Therefore it demands a lot more air than a p-trap (for instance) would require.

Furthermore, I'd call the builder back and tell him that the plumber's name wasn't on your contract, his was. He needs to deal with his subcontractor to make this right and not pawn it off on you, the customer.
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Old 01-12-2009, 01:30 PM   #5
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ejector pump venting


I don't see anything in the code that directly prohibits it, but I bet the manufacturer won't stand behind it. Therefore, it should have been caught by the inspector and enforced in my opinion, and the builder and plumber should both know that it isn't an ideal installation.
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:55 PM   #6
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ejector pump venting


I would call the local building office and confirm the allow wet venting for such an item. Seems like they would not. If they do, then ask why most of the country does not allow it and if it is properly installed why do you have the smell? You should not.
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Old 01-12-2009, 04:20 PM   #7
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ejector pump venting


Thank you both for your input! I will go back to the builder / plumber and the local inspector to check on the wet venting. This is something the builder should take care of, but then again they have a list of items from my closing back in August that they still have not completed so I won't hold me breath! I will post an update once I learn anything more. If anyone has additional info or documentation on grinder pump / ejector pump wet venting feel free to post. The more knowledge I have in this area the better...Thanks!

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