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-   -   Does adding a new gas line to kitchnen need permit ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/does-adding-new-gas-line-kitchnen-need-permit-15518/)

kptbls 01-12-2008 02:00 PM

Does adding a new gas line to kitchnen need permit ?
 
We are planning to replace our electric stove with a gas one and getting gas line installed. We have a great room with a gas fireplace will be running the gas line from there to our kitchen.

My question is do we need a permit for this ?

Thanks in advance

Marlin 01-12-2008 04:16 PM

Are you doing it yourself?
What size line goes to the fireplace? The line may well be too small to run both a stove and a fireplace.
As for the permit question call your local building department and ask. It varies from town to town. It's free information and they're not going to stake out your house to make sure you're not doing it without a permit for just asking.

biggles 01-12-2008 04:48 PM

standing in front of the fireplace whats the distance to the stove

troubleseeker 01-12-2008 07:29 PM

Gas work is pretty much required to be permitted and done by a licensed plumber or person with a gas fitter certification in most areas. Even though most plumbers will probably not pull a permit for what you describe, I would have them do the work. First, they can assess the existing supply to see exactly what it feeds and if it is large enough. Secondly, this will probably involve cutting and threading pipe, tools that most DIY do not have. Third, should anything go drastically wrong and your insurance company determines that gas work was done by a non qualified professional, they will walk away scott free.

Marlin 01-12-2008 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 87904)
Gas work is pretty much required to be permitted and done by a licensed plumber or person with a gas fitter certification in most areas. Even though most plumbers will probably not pull a permit for what you describe, I would have them do the work. First, they can assess the existing supply to see exactly what it feeds and if it is large enough. Secondly, this will probably involve cutting and threading pipe, tools that most DIY do not have. Third, should anything go drastically wrong and your insurance company determines that gas work was done by a non qualified professional, they will walk away scott free.

You're right that a pro wouldn't pull a permit for this even if they technically are supposed to. That is unless the job becomes a complete re-pipe, then they should get a permit.
You mentioned threading pipes which is a good point. The threading equipment I use will set you back just over $2,000 to get set up with the cheaper one. You can buy a real cheap threader and die set for about $150, use a beach mounted pipe vice for about $50, and use a bucket and cup for an oiler. I've never used the cheap threaders but imagine it would work fine for one job. You can't use flexable lines without being certified and I don't trust the stuff anyway.
Your third point about the insurance is the biggest thing. Homes rarely catch fire from gas leaks but it does happen. If a plumber does it their insurance may be liable, if not your homeowners will cover it. If you do it with no permits they may not cover it. You probably can pull a permit and have it inspected. In that case your homeowners would cover any damage. To have it inspected though you need a pressure test which runs about $300.

gregzoll 01-13-2008 03:23 PM

My father used to take gas pipe to the local Ace Hardware when they used to cut & thread pipe. Now, you can pretty much get any length already threaded & cut at a hardware store.

comp 01-13-2008 08:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 88143)
My father used to take gas pipe to the local Ace Hardware when they used to cut & thread pipe. Now, you can pretty much get any length already threaded & cut at a hardware store.

H-D and Lowes have threaders there

gregzoll 01-13-2008 08:44 PM

I have never seen our local H-D or Lowes with the Thread Cutting machines at the stores, only the manual ones that you can buy.

FORDFAN006 01-13-2008 08:45 PM

no need to thread pipe.... its call csst////// the best thing going in the gas piping business.. any home owner can do it,if any questions email me fordfan006@yahoo.com

Marlin 01-13-2008 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FORDFAN006 (Post 88263)
no need to thread pipe.... its call csst////// the best thing going in the gas piping business.. any home owner can do it,if any questions email me fordfan006@yahoo.com

Correction, this is one of the worst things to happen to the gas piping business. Once you make the job too easy the hacks move right in. Their is a right way to use this, most installers don't follow it though. Even installed correctly the failure rate is much higher than standard black pipe.
You are supposed to need a certification to buy/install the stuff. Yes, you can get your hands on it without a certification, most supply houses won't ask. If anything goes wrong though your home owners insurance probably isn't going to cover it unless you are certified.

comp 01-14-2008 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 88259)
I have never seen our local H-D or Lowes with the Thread Cutting machines at the stores, only the manual ones that you can buy.

where are you located ???

gregzoll 01-14-2008 09:46 PM

Springfield, IL.

End Grain 01-14-2008 10:03 PM

Here's a vest-pocket opinion. I don't know about the code itself in your area or the permit requirements, but when it comes to running a gas line line where one never was, I strongly recommend that you retain a licensed plumber to do the job. It's a one-time expense and if you ever go to sell the house and an inspector questions who did the gas line addition, you have a sturdy leg to stand on. Here in AZ, a lot of problems occur when the prospective owner's inspector requests the building plans that are on file. Then, all good kinds of stuff happen for the seller who cannot substantiate when or how the work was done or, better yet, WHO did the work! I always caution my customers about this BEFORE they decide to do something that may bite them on the keester afterwards.

bigMikeB 01-15-2008 06:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 88259)
I have never seen our local H-D or Lowes with the Thread Cutting machines at the stores, only the manual ones that you can buy.

Even the smallest depot in NJ threads pipe.

bigMikeB 01-15-2008 06:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marlin (Post 88290)
Correction, this is one of the worst things to happen to the gas piping business. Once you make the job too easy the hacks move right in. Their is a right way to use this, most installers don't follow it though. Even installed correctly the failure rate is much higher than standard black pipe.
You are supposed to need a certification to buy/install the stuff. Yes, you can get your hands on it without a certification, most supply houses won't ask. If anything goes wrong though your home owners insurance probably isn't going to cover it unless you are certified.


There are also grounding issues with CSST that have been brought up, I think there is something in the new NEC code about bonding it.


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